The Top 5 Things to Remember When Potty Training

Potty training a puppy or even an adult or older dog can be daunting and overwhelming this list is to help you get back to the basics and get on the right track!

#5  Crate Training is Your Friend

Utilize a crate and make your life easier.  People who just bring their puppies straight home and allow complete access to the house, have the most trouble with potty training.  Utilize a crate and the process will be easier for you both.

There are many types of crates from indestructible police K9 type crates to mesh crates (although I don’t recommend these for puppies or at the beginning of training).  There is something out there that will help you and your puppy become successful.

#4 Establish a routine

Routines make your job easier and help your new puppy get use to your lifestyle.  If he eats and drinks at about the same time each day, chances are he will urinate and defecate also at the same time each day!

#3 Pick a Specific Spot Outside

Pick a certain place outside in your yard and be sure to take your puppy to it each time you take him outside!  Be sure to go with him and watch him.  It doesn’t matter if it is 100 degrees or 10 below zero; raining or snowing, if you don’t go outside and monitor your puppy you will not know if or when he is going potty outside.

If you leave your puppy out for an hour or two…he will probably have to go potty again soon!  Just because you let him in 10 minutes ago doesn’t mean he went potty right before you let him in!

#2 Supervise

Supervise your puppy at all times.  Supervision means he can’t sneak away and go potty in another room or behind furniture.  It also means that he won’t be chewing on items he shouldn’t or getting into other types trouble.  Supervision is imperative with young puppies!  I recommend an inside tether and keeping him with you at all times, unless he is in his crate!  Although it is a lot of work, it pays off in the end!

#1 It is All About YOUhow to train a puppy to pee outside, puppy won t potty outside

Stop thinking that potty training is about your puppy!  Potty training is all about you and it is your responsibility when he is young to help him be successful.  Get him outside about every two hours, monitor him outside and when he is inside and be diligent!  Be kind, puppies are like babies, they gain bladder control at different times.  Although you can stop the flow of urine by quietly startling your pup and then getting him outside.  Do not scream or shove his nose in it, be kind so that he will be willing to go outside in front of you.

Sure, accidents happen but if you make it your goal to ensure his success you will both be happy in a short amount of time!

Good luck and as always reward your puppy for correct decisions and doing the right thing and have fun together!  Don’t focus on the mistakes, focus on the positives and moving together toward probably your first big goal!

 

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Comments

  1. Great list! I think the point you made about the owner being the crucial aspect of whether or not potty training will succeed is absolutely true. It’s up to use to make sure the dog gets into a routine and has consistency.

    [Reply]

    Tim Grover Reply:

    Routine with puppy potty training is particularly important – if your puppy knows that he will be going outside at a particular time during the day and evening then it is often surprising how well and quickly they can be trained to actually go to the toilet. Reward is obviously essential to. Congratulate your puppy with praise.

    [Reply]

    noleen colhoun Reply:

    My puppy is now 16wks old and will not go potty outside at all, he’s never once even weed outside!! When I take him out, he’ll have a good play around and sniff and I’ve noticed that after a while he’ll start pulling me back towards the house and I’ve found out this is because he needs the toilet, so I started to keep him out longer after he starts pulling me towards home but it doesn’t seem to matter how long I keep him out, he will hold it in until we get home and he heads straight to his spot on where he was taught to go potty on paper and do his business! Its really starting to get me down now and I feel like I’m failing my puppy who I love very much 🙁 anyone have any extra tips for me please?? I’ve tried the same spot, a rag with his urine on it, even tried taking a sheet of newspaper and laying down to see if he’ll use that like he does indoor but no! Thanx to everyone in advance.

    [Reply]

    sonia Reply:

    i have the exact same problem as noleen, only my pup is 5 months. you’re not alone!
    any advice is much appreciated.

    [Reply]

    Rose Reply:

    I have this exact problem too?! Hellpppppp he has held the poo in for 14 hours because I keep taking him outside when he starts to go but he won’t go outside!!!!

    Minette Reply:

    Eventually they have to go. I had a Rottweiler that didn’t want to go on leash, after almost 2 full days she finally pooped, then it was easy.

    Rose Reply:

    yep minette was right he finally went after 24 hours! What I had to do was just keep him in his crate every moment that I wasn’t actively playing with him ( if you look away for a second they will go because at that point they really gotta go) and just keep bringing him out every chance I could to walk or play etc making sure to every time take him to his spot. Once he finally went he stopped refusing to go. The key is to never let him do it in the house again or he will think hey I’ll just wait, since obviously that’s what he preferred. Hence the crate situation! Wick now knows he can’t go inside because I don’t give him the chance .. So he goes right away when he needs to outside. However he still walks over to the spot inside when he needs to go… I just have to catch him early ( hopefully he will learn soon, usually I take him out before this even happens.)

    Minette Reply:

    Kudos to you for making a change and watching him! It will only get easier from here!

  2. Barbara says:

    How in the heck are you supposed to keep a puppy in one spot? I take my 10 week-old puppy outside but she won’t do anything until after she’s sniffed and run around a bit. And I definitely can’t get her to stay in a small spot. That was my hope when I got her, that I’d be able to teach her how to do that, but it hasn’t worked out that way.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    exercise prior to taking your pup to one spot is great! It gets everything moving, then use a leash to keep her in one spot. It doesn’t have to be a “small” spot just one designated spot in your yard. Most dogs prefer to have a “spot” to go instead of going all over the yard. Just help her to go there each time you go out together!

    [Reply]

    Barbara Reply:

    As soon as we exercise (walk around the neighborhood), she poops. So exercising her and then having her poop in the backyard doesn’t seem possible.

    [Reply]

    mkfisher Reply:

    I agree with Barbara….I tried to pick a certain spot for my GSD pup, and he just laid down and played. When I let him pick his own spot – he goes to it (or the very close vicinity) every time. I’ve only had him 27 hours, but he’s already got the hang of it. He poops in different places, but in the general area of each other. I’m just taking baby steps here, and learning as I go 🙂

    [Reply]

  3. Connie says:

    I look at housebreaking the same as I do potty training a child. You must establish a routine and use the whole family to help. Including an older dog if you have one. I do not crate train, but my dogs have their own room that they are confined in when we are not at home. They also have their own yard. We have a doggie door and my older dog just helped to train our new puppy. It took 24 hours and we have only had 2 accidents, I call that successful.

    [Reply]

    Jack Falkner Reply:

    Pretty much the same thing albeit slightly different. The older Great Dane is my renter’s dog on the front of my property, however I’ve put up plastic curtains (the ones used in restaurants to keep walk in freezer doors open etc on my back door to keep the parrots out), and allows my pup to come and go as she pleases. Occasionally I get an unwanted guest who slip under he radar, but the Pup’s been trained totally from before 4 months. Jack

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  4. teresa says:

    Standing outside in the pouring rain or snow in my PJs 20 min a time till she would go, praise her to the skys, nighbours thought I was mad, go back to bed, puppy asleep in 2 min me awake half the night. So tiring but by 4 months she could wait till 6am or reliably wake me up if needed, by 6 months she could wait till 9am and stayed in her first hotel.
    After age 5 months we only had one accident just after she was spayed so she was a bit upset. Shes now 20months old, she dosnt have a spot in the yard but thats my fault for not enfourcing, she knows ‘busy’ and is very good about picking a quiet spot when out and about. Im glad we put the effort in when she was little.
    Try drawing a chalk box (or marking out a box on grass) if pup goes in the box praise and treat if she gos out the box just praise. The rain and snow kept washing my box away, I should of tried harder

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  5. annie wright says:

    With a tiny back yard, with virtually no grass, we thought potty training may be a little difficult with our new four month old pup, but we chose a soft groundcover plant that we were prepared to sacrifice, and encouraged her to use that. Each time she obliged, we praised her and repeated “Do Wee’s” within a week she knew where to go, and now we only need to say “Do wee’s” before we go out in the car, or to bed at night (she sleeps with us) and we haven’t had an accident till the other night when the back door was accidentally closed and she had to use the doormat.
    Our old dog that died in January was trained the same way, in fact we could tell him to go and do “Poos’ and he would go into the long grass out of the way of foot traffic.
    Putting name to the action seems to be the most successful – they remember very quickly.

    [Reply]

    Barbara Reply:

    I have been telling my puppy to “go potty” every time I take her out. Every time she pees or poops, I give her lots of praise. Maybe she’s too young to learn too much right now, I don’t know. She’s only 10 weeks old. But she won’t pee or poop as soon as we’re outside, or sometimes even within 10 minutes. In fact, at night when I take her out, she sits at the front door and doesn’t seem to want to even walk outside.

    [Reply]

    Kathleen Reply:

    You have to be patient. Sometimes it takes a while. They all learn at different speeds. I have 3 dogs and my male took about 6 months to be fully potty trained while my 9 month old female only had 1 accident in the house and was fully potty trained in about 3 weeks. I know it can be frustrating but your patience and persistence will pay off. I used the crate training method. I would put a leash on them and immediately take them to the “spot” in the yard and say “go potty” and wait until they went. I would then give tons of praise. Sometimes it would be instant and sometimes I would stand there for an hour. I wouldn’t take them for walks until they went potty first. The time got shorter and shorter each week and now they let themselves out through a doggy door. I also picked up every area rug in the house so there would be no temptations to try out the soft spot! Another tip I found very useful is to keep a Diaper Genie in the yard. It makes picking up very convenient and there is no smell. I use the deluxe one that has a little contraption inside that closes when the lid is opened then opens and drops the poop down into a bag as soon as the lid closes. Good luck with the potty training!!

    [Reply]

    Monika Reply:

    All of this advice is accurate. Since the pup is only 10 weeks old , you, my friend, must be patient!!
    The 3 P’s of Pet Training: Patience, Practice, Praise!!
    Puppies become very distracted by smells, sights and sounds. If you can choose a quiet potty spot outside. Be patient and quiet. Say ‘go potty’ or what ever words you are going to use EVERY TIME, in almost a whisper. When pottying is accomplished give lots and lots of praise like its the best thing in the world-puppy will love pleasing you!
    Know when your pup is ready to potty. After eating, excercise, upon waking, excitement, every 2-3 hours,etc.. Your puppy may also be scared of the dark to go at night, try to establish trust and puppy will learn whatever you say is OK.

    [Reply]

    Anita Reply:

    just be patient. It’ll happen.

    [Reply]

    kim Reply:

    Im having the same problem. my puppy is 5 months old and all he does is lays by the door. But when we take him out he just lays in the snow. I love him but i dont know what else to do for him.

    [Reply]

    mkfisher Reply:

    I can’t claim any expert advice, but I know going in that I’ve got to have tons of patience. Not my strong suit, but he is just a little guy and needs my help.

    I’ve only had my 7wk old GSD puppy for a little over 24 hours. That quickly, he has learned what potty is, and where it is. As soon as he wakes up, I leash him at the crate door, take him out the same door, say let’s go potty, and most of the time he goes the minute he gets to the spot. We’ve done this a LOT of times already, as I am taking him about every 2 hours. Only twice has he hesitated. Then we walk around in the freezing cold (lol) while he sniffs for just the right poopy spot. He gets tons of praise and seems to love it.

    When he comes back in – when I eventually put him back in his crate – I give him two very tiny little beef flavored treats (he still has a tiny mouth) – and he lays down and is quiet. Important to make him think the crate is a good thing and not a punishment. We’ve only had two accidents, and that was because I didn’t know I had to take him out 2-4 minutes after he drank or 5-10 min after he ate. Guess he’s still so young, he doesn’t have the control. As his control gets better, and I can trust him a little more, he will spend more and more time out of the crate with me. He slept through the first night with only one potty break at 1am. I was shocked.

    I love this little bugger 😉

    [Reply]

  6. Susan Bizak says:

    I was with my puppy as a volunteer at the shelter where she was born. I socialized the litter. When they had an accident on the floor, I picked them up and put them on the potty pad, so they could finish on the pad and said, “Potty.”
    When Beezer came home at 8 weeks old, I kept her on an umbilical cord (leash and belt). I could see the signs when she had to go and took her out,saying, “Potty Time.” When she peed I praised her and gave her a potty treat. I knew her reactions and she trusted me and we really bonded!

    I still say,”Make a poop for Mommy.” and she poops. I sing a potty song and say, “Potty Time” and she goes. When it’s Beezer’s idea to go, she tells me by walking to the door and ringing the potty bell. Then I take her out, she goes and I reward with affection, play, or treat.

    I watched your video on the umbilical cord. It was a great help. One thing though, we live in Arizona. The pavement can go up to 130 degrees. I use booties with velcro so she doesn’t burn her feet. She can’t go when her feet hurt.

    Thanks for your video and printed instructions.

    [Reply]

  7. Jo says:

    the day after I brought home my 6 week old puppy the snow arrived and stayed for three months so the little creature didn’t have a clue about grass etc. I used the crate and puppy pads when I wasn’t around to supervise her and for during the night. Yes I did have the odd accident in the living room but as soon as she looked like she wanted to wee then I would pick her up and she went outside. When the snow started to melt she would continue to find little patches of snow to try and do her business but gradually through going out for walks she got the message grass was also a toilet spot.

    I also have a cat flap and she would use this to go out to the toilet when required. Now that she is too big to use this other than stick her head out to see what is happening, she will stretch up and rattle the keys and I know then that she needs out.

    All in all we got there together I’d say.

    [Reply]

  8. Ursula says:

    My 5 yr old Jackson started going potty in the house. I did some detective work to figure out what was causing the mishaps ever so often. I found that Jackson had mishaps when I wasn’t the one responsible for him. I caught my husband telling him for 10 minutes or more saying, “Just a minute” when Jackson was doing his little bark and lunge towards him. Once I trained my husband to the fact that when Jackson starts his potty dance, you have just enough time to get away from the game on TV, put your shoes on, put his leash on and get out the door. But the going potty in the house didn’t stop until I told my husband, “From now on when you keep telling Jackson ‘just a minute’ and he potties in the house…YOU are going to be the one to haul out the carpet cleaner and scrub the carpet….YOU are the one that is going to take the bedding, or curtains he potties on and wash them!” Once it became more work than just putting a lease on and taking Jackson out, the potty mishaps stopped. Housebreaking a dog doesn’t do any good if he/she can’t get outside without help from the owners. It’s like telling a baby to change it’s own diaper. It’s NOT going to happen.

    [Reply]

    Sherry Reply:

    This is SOOOOOOO TRUE!!!! Our dog poops in the house. I work so I am gone from 6 am until 7 pm. My Dad however is home with the dog. I come home and go thru the same thing each time with my Dad. The dog has pooped in the house usually somewhere in the dining room or on area rugs. I make my Dad pick it up because he is the one at fault not necessarily the dog. I have watched the dog do his little potty dance around my Dad and Dad pays no attention to him. I have mentioned this to my Dad but he gives the same excuse. I just don’t know what else to do to get it through to him that he has to fix this problem? This dog is going to go on pooping in the house the rest of his life and ruin the rugs while he is at it? How do I train the HUMAN!!!!!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Try rewarding your dad with something he really wants if he sets an alarm and lets the dog out every two hours or so while you are gone 😉 see if a little positive reinforcement works

    [Reply]

    Sherry Reply:

    Thanks Minnette – Its worth a try! Bribery and corruption might just work. LOL!

  9. Beverly says:

    I have a problem with my 1yo Tenterfield Terrier. I am partially bed-ridden, thus I am not up during the day, “Duke” has the entire run of the backyard, about 1/3 acre. Yet, no matter how long he is outside or how many times a day he goes in and out, he always goes to the toilet in the house. Albeit, he goes on his puppy pads which I have down in the bathroom, but he never goes outside where he should. How do I train him to a specific spot when I have to go down 13 steps from the deck (which I can bearly manage) so he will stop going in the house? He loves outside and bounding and leaping all over the yard, but why won’t he go potty out there? Puppy pads are not cheap and I’ve never had a problem with any of my previous dogs going outside. I’m at my wits end. My husband opens the back door to the deck as soon as he and Duke wake up in the morning and Duke goes straight outside, but… What do I do?

    [Reply]

    Barb Reply:

    Beverly;
    I too have had some problems getting outside quickly enough. I too used puppy pads. While they are helpful at first, they are just another distraction from doing what you want. My trainer helped me get the dogs outside. First I had to take up the puppy pads altogether, so they weren’t there to go to. Then I placed a bell on the door so the dogs had a way to tell me when they had to go. I rang the bell each time they needed to go outside.
    I’m thinking you can use all the methods listed with one exception. If you can see the while he is outside, just stand at the top of the steps and wait until he goes. (he may not go at first ’cause he’s used to going inside, but if you block off the inside area so he can’t get to it…put him on a leash or in a crate when he returns inside without going…then take him right back out…he’ll go). He’ll be circling the area he used to go in…just get him right back outside, he’ll go and reward him. Happy trying.

    [Reply]

    Mary Reply:

    Beverly: I think if you can afford it, a retractable leash will help you. If he will go down the steps without you, that might help. We only have to steps and my husband uses a retractable leash on one and one of the long leash cords on the other. And like Barb said crates are wonderful,but just enough room to lay down comfortably. Hope this helps.

    [Reply]

  10. Connie Porter says:

    My husband is exactly like that! If I’m not home, he almost never takes the dog out! Very frustrating!

    [Reply]

    Ursula Reply:

    Connie it is very frustrating. Why don’t some guys just ‘get it’?

    [Reply]

    Peter Gobel Reply:

    The exact same techniques that work for training dogs, cats and horses works just as well for Husbands.
    First, figure out what is his “reward”? Then break the activity into component parts and start building the chain.
    gets up from his chair- “Awh, Hon, you’re going to take the dog out what a wonderful man you are!
    You don’t care if he got up to go to the bathroom, assume the best of intentions and reward, reward, reward.

    Good luck.

    [Reply]

  11. Lisa says:

    Well my puppy is 5 months old. After he eats, I wait for about 20 minutes to take him out to potty at the same little spot for about 20 minutes or more. But he is determined that he will not use it outside. As soon as we come back in the house he will use it on the newspaper in the crate. What am I doing wrong?

    [Reply]

    Peter Gobel Reply:

    You now know the pattern, use it.
    Feed dog
    Wait 20 minutes
    out for potty
    no go
    Back in house BUT, you know he still needs to go, don’t take the leash off walk around the house, being sure to not stop long enough for him to “go off” and lead him right back outside.
    he goes, PRAISE & REWARD
    he doesn’t go, back inside and continue going back outside until you get the opportunity to reward his going in the right place.

    [Reply]

  12. Lynn says:

    Help !! I have a 2yr old Jack Russell – male – who lifts his leg on every item of furniture in the house – any new item coming into the house and the usual spots on items already in the house. I’m at my wits end and don’t know what to do to stop this. He goes outside every 2 hours so it’s not that he’s cooped up inside all day. What do you suggest I do ?

    [Reply]

    Janet Reply:

    I have a similar problem with my 2 year old male neutered Jack Russell. The French doors are open all day and he happily goes outside to wee. However, he occasionally decides to leave his mark on the furniture and also does this when we visit family and friends. He doesn’t seem to have a problem when left shut up alone in the house for a couple of hours, but when we are at home together and I am busy in another room or we go visiting he resorts to this unsociable behaviour. What can I do to stop this?!!

    [Reply]

  13. cliff rutherford says:

    Our Dog is house trained,,,But when we leave her she gose to another room and pees…poos,,she only dose this when we leave her ,,,,But at home she is good as gold,,,she sleeps with us and will aweaken us if she has to go …So how do I break her of peeing when we go out,….Cliff

    [Reply]

  14. Peter Holtje says:

    I walk my daughter’s brilliant Black Lab 2 or 3 times a week, usually at the town beach, or the surrounding woods in summer. Walking him in one morning on the entry road, I realized that if he evacuated in front of a crowd he’d be chastised, so I placed him in a bunch of growth three feet tall where he wouldn’t be seen, and said “Do your business.” He DID. I kept doing it for several visits, told my daughter about it, and she tried it…he’d been trained! Yes, luck was on my side. Let’s face it, luck is a great assistance in training otherwise smart dogs. That’s especially true when you’re not good at training dogs.

    [Reply]

  15. Lanita Reitsma says:

    When an indoor clean up is needed do not use any product with ammonia , check the labels . Urin has amonia in it and a product like windex will clean up good on a hard surface but draw them back to it because of the amonia

    [Reply]

  16. I rescued a 3 yr. laphaspoo from the humane so. 7 months ago, he was taken from a lady who had 41 dogs. potty training him has been a nightmare and still is. ive tried most everything.he will go well for a few days then back to his peeing and else. he is a sweet dog, but will not mingle with other pets or people, he was so scared and skiddish when we brought him home. after all these months he now is friends with my husband.but no one else, if we have company he will bark the whole time they are here unless he is right under me.
    the crate doesnt do it, ive tried so many times with him and he has barked constantly for a solid 30 min. i live in a town house so its hard to let him bark so much at once with other people living here. what do u suggest?
    anyone? thanks.
    Melba

    [Reply]

    Barb Reply:

    Melba; I have a couple of barkers too. I had a trainer in and they suggested laying a towel over the crate until they are quiet for 3 seconds, then remove the towel (essentially you are removing their privileges to see the guests until they quiet down). Their reward is getting to see what’s going on.
    There’s only one person this doesn’t work for with me and that is because of his reaction to the dogs…that I haven’t been able to control.
    Sher

    [Reply]

  17. Reggie says:

    I have a Cocker Spaniel that is about 1 1/2 yrs old. We also have a 3 yr. old German Shepherd. We never used a crate, but kept her enclosed in the mud room when she was tiny. She seemed to be trained pretty well except for an accident once in a while. But just recently she started leaving messes on a regular basis, and I’m not sure why or what changed to cause this to happen. What I would like to know, is it too late to get a crate to try and train her? And what about the other dog. They are like brother & sister (or think they are). Do you think there will be a problem? Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

    [Reply]

  18. kathie says:

    We adopted a 3 year old German Shepherd who flunked out of service dog training. He is obedience trained, listens well, and is very friendly. His problem is being overly submissive. If he thinks you are mad at him, he will pee in the house or out. This can happen at totally unexpected times. We can be playing and having fun and all of a sudden, something you say or the tone of your voice will make him act submissive and pee. It seems unpredictable. The moment he tucks his tail or puts his ears back, you have to leave him alone completely. Even if you try to reassure him by patting him and telling him he’s a good dog, he will pee. Sometimes, we can go a month or more without an incident, but then it suddenly happens again. Outside, I can tell him to come to be brushed 100 times and he will be fine, but on the 101st time, he will act submissive and the pee will dribble out.

    [Reply]

  19. Lois says:

    I hung a bell on the door knob and taught my dogs to ring when they have to potty. I did this by making them ring it every time I put them out when they were puppies. It didn’t take long for them to catch on. Now, they will play with your mind by ringing sometimes when they don’t have to potty, but do you take the chance? There may be an accident when you don’t here the bell, but my oldest will ring again with gusto when I don’t come to open the door. My male will also ring when he can’t find me, because he knows I come when the bell is rung.

    [Reply]

  20. Amanda says:

    I have to potty train a puppy about once a year and I use the old ‘watch and praise’ method. It works really well for me. I also have older dogs that make the process easier. Before the puppy’s bladder has developed, you have to watch them constantly.

    They have to pee when they wake up, after they eat, after they drink and a bunch of times in between. You establish a routine and watch for their ‘clues’. You’ll usually pick them up after the first day or two, and each dog has different clues. So I take them outside every hour or so and go over the top with praise when they potty outside. (Sometimes, they’ll be older, go potty and look up expectantly for praise! lol)

    Before their bladder is developed any accidents in the house are MY fault, so I don’t chastise. I just praise them when they do right and ignore the accidents. However, once they’ve been on this routine for a couple of weeks, their bladder is bigger and they usually get the idea that outside is where they are supposed to go. At that point, accidents in the house are a no-no and I usually bring them over to the accident. Say “no” in a firm voice, and then put them outside.

    With this method, I usually have them fully potty trained by the time they are 12-13 weeks old. (Keep in mind their bladders don’t develop until 11 weeks old.)

    I had one puppy that I got to raise from birth. She was potty trained by 7 weeks. She still didn’t have a developed bladder, but she would immediately go to the door when she knew it was time. If I didn’t get there fast enough, that was my fault.

    Anyway, I enjoyed giving my two cents.
    Thanks

    [Reply]

  21. Jens Christy says:

    We had a dog visitor pee on our carpet and some time later our house broken four year old border collie “remarked” the spot and continued to do so when we weren’t looking. We finally tore up all the carpet and tiled the whole floor.A few weeks later when we laid down an area rug in a different room, he found it convenient to mark it. The area rugs (now two) are now covered with plastic.
    He has marked them both as well once. We don’t dare remove them?

    [Reply]

  22. Annie W. says:

    When we brought our mini schnauzer home from the breeder’s at 7 weeks of age….my husband and I took turns getting up every hour to an hour-and-a-half to take her out to potty. Everytime she went potty…we said either “Good PeePee” OR “Good “PooPoo”, and we jumped with excitment. She quickly learned to “Pee” and “Poop” pretty much on command. She has also spent every night, since we first brought her home, sleeping in her crate. She has never given us any problem. That is just the way we were going to do things and she adapted to the routine very nicely. I believe dogs need a set routine daily just like children do. Either my husband or I made sure one of us was always around her when she was young to watch for the signs of when she had to go out. We, too, took her out after she played, as well as after she ate. We always go with her …we never send her out alone to potty. RE: Food…..You should NEVER leave the food bowl out all day…if you do… you cannot judge your dog’s eliminations. When my dog was a puppy…I put the food bowl down several times a day (small portions), and now that she is older…she has two meals a day at approximately the same time every day. This way…I always know when she needs to go “Potty”. We have had no problems with her with pottying and/or crate training.

    [Reply]

  23. GregB says:

    We have 2 Pom’s – 8 yr. old female 6 pound and 2 yr.old male 15 pound (neutered). The little female will use a piddle-pad in my bathroom when she can’t hold it all night. That worked fine for 8 years. When someone is home she lets us know if she needs to go out. The male will always let us know if he needs to go out except when the little one uses the pad in the middle of the night his instinct is to go cover the scent of the little one by piddling on top of hers. If I remove the pad she will go on the floor in that area which I understand.
    This happens some nights and if we are gone all day and she can’t hold it. His scent is very strong smelling. I change pads every morning.
    Any ideas besides getting up in the middle of every night to let them out would be appreciated.

    [Reply]

  24. I have a one year old ShihTzu. I thought she was potty trained. However, every so often she will poop in the house, usually in the same area. I am replacing my carpeting as in the 8 months I have her and training her, I need new carpeting. (my fault) She sometimes brings her poop in from outside to play with and to eat it. I am at a loss as to why this is happening. She has a doggie door which she uses to go outside, so she isn’t being held back to go potty whenever nature calls. This situation has existed since she was being trained, and did stop for a time. The doctor prescribed some pills to try to curb the habit, however, that didn’t work either. So, please help an exasperated lady.
    Thank you.

    [Reply]

  25. Bea says:

    I have been so blessed. I have had 5 dogs over the past 25 years and have not really had to go through the standard potty training period. My older dog did this for me. Oh sure we had a few accidents but for the most part the pups just followed the lead of the older dog. The first dog trained the second dog, who trained the last three. She lived to be 18 years old and I sure miss her. I currently have just the two pups she trained.

    [Reply]

  26. Lisa M says:

    Our greyhound came to us at 1-1/2 years without ever racing but she had been on the “farm”. She is a spooky dog – not at all like our other greyhound – but she has now adapted pretty well to the house and the routines. We have a doggy door which she uses to eliminate outside but from time to time, for reasons only known to her, she goes in the house. How can we stop this random behavior?

    [Reply]

  27. Anta says:

    We have had our dog since he was about six hours old so I did the whole up every hour and a half or two hours feeding and cuddling him. As he started walking on his own we had a big box with potty pads inside that we would put him in as soon as he woke up in the morning and about every two hours. He soon learned to go in the box because no matter how much he cried he had to stay there until he went. Of course I would change the pads every time so that he had a clean place to go. Then we started taking him to the door and say “do you need to go outside?” and soon he learned that going outside was much better than going in the box. He was completely housebroken by ten weeks of age. He now lets us know when he needs (or wants) to go outside. He is very good about not having accidents in the house even when he has to be in for several hours at a time due to both of us working. We have been blessed with a really good dog.

    [Reply]

  28. karen says:

    I have always been able to train a puppy rapidly by putting her in a crate and taking her out every hour and saying “go potty.” This time we rescued an older dog who may have been a puppy mill breeder and had terrible associations with a crate. We’ve been using “poopy pads” and she quickly got the idea and now lives on the bed with our other dog, and is fine, even when we have to go to work all day.

    [Reply]

  29. Horace Moning says:

    I thank you very much fore this blog.

    [Reply]

  30. Pat W says:

    my toy Aussie pup was 4 mo old when I got her. She was flown in from Florida to us in Wisconsin where the weather is very different. She seemed to be paper trained, as that is where she chose to go, so I put papers/puppy pads by the back door. There is a pet door there and it wasn’t long before she could get in and out of the door. She pottied outside – thought all was good. Now – the pottying happens inside the house either by the pet door, or, if she has access to the whole sunroom, she potties anywhere on that tile. Pee and Poop. I really don’t know what to do with her – I have had dogs all my life but never had this problem before.

    [Reply]

  31. Mary Haney says:

    We have potty trained 3 poodles to go outside by hitting camel bells (which come on light rope) hanging from the door knob. Each time we took one
    to the door we would take it’s paw and slap the bells. Our first poodle was male and learned in 2 days that if he slapped the bells he could go outside, not necessarily to go to the potty, but it didn’t take him long to learn why I wanted him outside. The second poodle, a female, learned in two days that if she rang the bells she had to go outside and it took a little longer because she wasn’t as fond of outside as the first. Our third poodle is also a female and finally learned why we were ringing the bells. Now that we are older it is a great help to be able to hear the bells from a longer distance.

    Mary

    [Reply]

    Barb Reply:

    Mary, I understand the key to the bell ringing is to always respond immediately. Drop anything you are doing and get that door open. I’ve been training my poodles the same. On rings the bell. The other just paces, but when he starts pacing the first one rings the bell for him. They’ve got it all figured out.

    [Reply]

  32. Julia Norris says:

    My Schnaz-A-dor “Kola” is 10 months old, Kola was a rescued dog at 6 months. Also Kola was Starved, so Kola would eat like a Hoover, but I now have the “steal Zandies Food” syndrome under control. one success.
    Because it was cold and the middle of winter, And I am a widow and alone at home, I paper trained Kola inside the house. I also have a 10 year old schnauzer “Zandie” who now uses the paper some of the time. Zandie was outside trained until I got Kola, the new doggie. Zandie was also a rescued doggie at 6 Months, Caged for 6 months, He did paper train because of winter time, but easily broke to the outside when spring came.
    I work from home and am at the computer all day taking care of my job.
    How do I get Kola to train to the outside, and Zandie re-trained to the outside?

    [Reply]

  33. Anita Baker says:

    I always hear people complaining about not being able to potty train their dogs/puppies. As an owner of a 10 yrear old dog I still praise my dog every time he goes potty outside and even goes on command for me.
    I appreicate his efforts and I’ve always used positive reinforcements
    for all my training. I started training him at the moment he came into my house, took him to the same spot every time and watched him especially after eating, drinking, playing, sleeping, to assure he got outside to do his business then always praised him. I used a crate when he was 16 weeks old to start crate training him, leaving him room only to stand up and lay down and increased the crate space as he grew by a panel dividing the crate space. I always made sure he went potty before and after he was in crate and started with a few short times and increasing time in crate as he grew.Positive reinforcements are vital
    at this time, No negative responses even if he makes a mistake, as I’ve heard people rub their dogs noses in it which I find very wrong!! Concentrate on all the positive things, be patient, consistant, and
    remember if he makes a mistake it’s probably your fault for not paying attention to his needs.

    [Reply]

  34. Ursula says:

    I found that once you have a pee pad, they don’t want to go potty outside because they are trained to go on a pad. I would suggest taking the pee pad out when you take the dog out. Get him/her started on that outside. Then start taking the dog our on a lease and when he/she starts to go on the pad, gently pull them to the grass and when done show them where they peed, praise your dog highly, let him/her know how happy you are and give a small treat. Because my husband was being lazy and Jackson started peeing in the house, it was very hard to get him to stop. One of the things I did was become the mother dog. I took him where he peed, scolded him and then put his throat in my hand and made him look me in the eyes and told him “NO!” Then I put his lease on him and walked with him until he peed outside, and I praised him heavily, petting him, told him what a good boy he is and gave him a treat. He was so happy he tried to pee on every tree, talk piece of grass, anything he could to get the praise and treat. We had about 6 more mishaps and I just kept doing the above and now he can’t wait to get outside for the praise and treats. When I make him look me in the eyes, I do the two fingers towards his eyes, then move them towards my eyes and say, “Look at me, I am so upset with you!” He hates when I do that to him because he knows it means trouble. LOL

    [Reply]

  35. Ursula says:

    When you have your hand on your dogs throat please do not cause them any pain. Don’t put pressure. Dogs know what that means just to have your hand there because his/her mommy dog used to do that to him/her as a pup misbehaving. A mommy cat will do the same thing. Once I touch my dogs throat I can tell he is sweating it LOL

    [Reply]

  36. Todd Nichols says:

    I potty trained my 3 dogs,all differant breeds by putting in a doggie door; with a motion sensor light, the sensor aimed right at the door. Then I went through the door to show them it’s ok.Did that a couple of times ,then they started going in and out automatically. With a big bog like my Newffie I cut the bottom half of the door out and put up clear heavy plastic strips.

    [Reply]

  37. Jan says:

    My boy, a young 92 pound Doberman Service Dog, was trained to pee in a bag! We travel quit a bit (as well as live in an apartment), so ALWAYS going outside is NOT possible. His ’emergency’ pee box is in my bathroom just in case I can’t take him outside. To save on ‘piddle pads’ I taught him to pee on command whilst I hold a bag! This has had multiple benefits:
    1. He does his business on command – inside OR outside.
    2. I can take a handful of ‘pads’ with me when we travel, put one on the floor ANYWHERE, and he will wait on the pad for me to produce a bag! – The bag can be emptied into the toilet, and then knotted and thrown away easily. No.2s I allow on the ‘pad’ which is then dumped into the toilet, and the pad put into a bag, knotted and thrown away – no mess, no fuss, no smell!
    3. Outside he doesn’t stop at every other tree, or soil other people’s lawns or shrubs – he doesn’t even THINK about peeing or pooing unless I tell him.
    4. He has no problem figuring out toilet etiquette when he’s not with me, either. Day Camp, School, etc. – I hear he’s just fine!
    I only wish I’d taught him to ‘back up to a toilet’ for a No.2 – hmmm, wonder if that would be possible? – I’ll have to think about THAT :>)

    [Reply]

  38. GALE says:

    I HAVE TWO SHI TZUS, BROTHERS, A LITTLE OVER TWO YEARS OLD….
    THEY HAVE BEEN OUT OF THEIR CRATE AT NIGHT FOR A WHILE NOW, AND SLEEP ON THE BED WITH ME.AND HAVE BEEN DOING FINE ALL NIGHT….EXCEPT FOR THE LAST TWO MONTHS ONE OR BOTH (CUZ I CAN’T CATCH THEM, AND THEY DON’T WAKE ME UP) HAVE BEEN PEEING/MARKING ON THE BED OFF AND ON…..NATURALLY I AM NOT HAPPY ABOUT THIS, AND AM BESIDES MYSELF AS TO WHAT TO DO……..DO I RE CRATE THEM AT NIGHT OR WHAT?
    ANY INPUT WOULD REALLY BE WONDERFUL.AND WHY WON’T THEY WAKE ME, I AM A VERY LIGHT SLEEPER..

    [Reply]

  39. Susan Dias says:

    I can’t remember who told me this but…when my puppy was very young I was told “if your puppy pees or poops in the house roll up a newspaper and hit yourself in the head with it…because you weren’t doing your job! I thought that was great.I have been taking my shih tzu out every 3 hours since she was 8 weeks old and we have been very successful::)

    [Reply]

  40. Mike says:

    We have a almost 7 mo old cock-a-chon puppy we got when he was 3 mos old. He is VERY STUBBORN. He has a designated spot we take him to on his leash. We have for the most part been very diligent. However, when the grass is wet, like it seems to have been here in WI quite often, he doesn’t want to poop. Instead he will choose to poop inside. It is driving me mad. I need suggestions. If we don’t have him on a leash in our fenced in backyard he would still choose to go elsewhere too. Frustrated!

    [Reply]

  41. Jill says:

    Mt puppy has finally gotten into a routine.She still would prefer to play when taken out but potty time comes first.She finally figured it out.

    [Reply]

  42. Madalene says:

    I have a little (8) lb Shih tzu, that I got last March of 2010. She was 7 months when I got her, and knew absolutely nothing about going potty outside. She was trained for the wee wee pads. Anyway, I have her a year and 4 months, and she will be 2 next week. 99 percent of the time she goes outside (with Me) and does potty. About every 4-6 weeks tho, she decides to either pee or poo in the house……anywhere! Not by the front door. She is crate trained, so if she does not do poo when I think she should go (after eating) me or my husband put her back in the crate. It seems like the ONE time we do not do that, she goes in the house!!! I wonder with her going outside most of the time why she does not even go to the door, or attempt to let me know she has to go. I feel like most of the time I am just “preventing” an accident, because I take her out often, at least 5 times a day. There is always myself of my husband home. Also, sometimes an hour after she pees, of she drinks more water, she will pee in the house. of course we did not prevent this, becuase after only one hour we would not expect that she has to go. we let her play outside the crate, in our view of course for about 2 hours after she goes. We feel like she is always confined, so we like to give her some free time to get her excersise…. So frustrating now. I feel bad that we have not gotten over this milestone yet.

    [Reply]

  43. David says:

    Hi all. I have a 11 week old puppy Weimaraner called Argi. She is pretty good at doing her bits and pieces, however occasionally there is the odd puddle here and there, We take her out the back every 2 to 3 hours and she’s getting pretty good. She understands wee wee very well.After eating times, she is taken out within 10 minutes of finishing, and she’s learning pretty well.We give her lots of exercise and she loves it. She’s hard work but worth every minute of it.

    I believe nearly all dogs can learn. But first the owners need to be educated.

    [Reply]

  44. PY says:

    Hi, I have a 5 month old Mini Schnauzer. She was three month old when i got her. She was trained to pee in the washroom. Lately, I found out about this potty pad. Been trying for weeks to get her on the pad but she refuse. Once she get off the pad she will pee. How do I get her to pee on the pad?

    [Reply]

  45. Sonja Maloney says:

    No one has really come up with a solution to pee marking everything. The dogs, a curly Dachsy, 3 yr, and a 2yr. border type collie, small, have the habit now at the new home they moved to, but it was happening at the prior home too. Also have 3 cats, no problem, all get along well. My daughter is beside her self, but hates to give the problem to some one else!!? What is there to do? Hope some one can help. Sonja

    [Reply]

  46. John says:

    I have had two labs and both were trained to go out to do their duties in just two days after we got them, I just made it a habit to take them out every half hour or so and kept an eye on them to make sure they went potty and they were very good at it..I also made sure that the got a treat each time for a reward for not going in the house.both of them are gone now, but hope to soon get a new one,it is fun to train them and let them see how to do things proper . so just take patience and it will pay off .

    [Reply]

  47. ann says:

    my 4pd chihuahua2yr. old is not neutered should he get neutered and why is it important ann please email me ann

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Neuter him to reduce his risk of cancer and to help with his marking behavior!

    [Reply]

  48. Sandi says:

    My sister just inherited her daughters puppy (1 yr old) that was trained on indoor pee pads (breeder), and she (and her daughter) have been unable to train him to go outside. He does submissive piddling, and pees inside whenever he wants to. Would this technique work for her even though he’s a year old?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Yes, just don’t bend over him or yell at him when he submissively pees.

    You have to limit his access and keep him with you to make a difference.

    [Reply]

  49. brandy says:

    I have had my puppy for almost two wks now, he has done so good with potty training up until today . he sleeps thru the whole night wakes up and goes potty right away. today he has gone potty outside:) but when he comes in house few mins later he would go in house 🙁 don’t know what to do. he goes potty in living rm and it has carpet

    [Reply]

  50. kasedy byrne says:

    i have a put bull pup and he is about 9 weeks old. no matter how hard i try he will not poop outside. I have tryed awardig him when he goes outside and that does not help i tell him no when he goes in the house and when he goes outside i tell him what a good dog he is. it is very hard to potty train him at my house because everyone does it diffrent and they make it stressful on me when they do. i work 3ed shift so that is another reason why it is so hard to potty train him. i cat figure out what i am doing wrong please help me

    [Reply]

  51. bryan says:

    I just got a 12 week old that looks like a blue tick mixed with something. He acts like he has to go outside every 10 minutes. Usually he just sniffs around and sometimes he will pee or poop but never both. He poops upwards of 6 times per day. We changed his food because something was making his feces almost liquid. He sleeps inith my girlfriend and I AMD almost every morning he has pooped on the floor at least once. Should I just put him in a crate when I’m sleeping?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I would crate him! Crate training is great to rely on throughout a dogs life as well

    [Reply]

  52. Hanna Lynn says:

    I just got a 10 1/2 week old Mini Schnauzer pup Im using a crate to train her, also letting her out frequently when not crated…. they say every 1hr for each month of age, she is not holding her urine for only 45mins-1hr…. maybe im giving her to much water…. i keep her water dish always full, and she does drink frequently…. i feed her science diet food…… can anyone help with this?????

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    you can either limit water a bit (although this may make her drink more) or get her out more often.

    Go out with her, and read her signs, most sniff or wander a bit prior to squatting and meal feed.

    [Reply]

  53. Kaitlyn says:

    Hey everyone!!
    So we just got a puppy today (8 weeks old) and he has only been outside with the breeder a few times when he got him. And the day we picked him up, it snowed…So he hates the snow, cause its cold, and will barely walk at all. I have to carry him and then pop him down on the snow outside. He just freezes and looks at me, and will not move, let alone go to the bathroom. The snow will be here to stay for a while now, and I obviously don’t want him doing his business inside. Any help on how to get him to walk/pee/poop outside in the snow?
    Thank you so so much, it is really appreciated!
    Kaitlyn

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I would shovel him a place to go out and walk until he gets a little older.

    He will figure it out and it will get better, but first shovel him a path and stop carrying him so that he has to learn to move with cold feet.

    [Reply]

    Kaitlyn Reply:

    Thank you so much for your response!
    If he just sits down outside and wont walk, should I kind of pull/drag him alone? Ive tried but he doesnt start to walk, even after I pull. We have had a few succesful bathroom runs, just feel bad for him cause the cold.
    Thank you again!!
    Kaitlyn

    [Reply]

  54. Jennifer says:

    my 8 month old great dane was geting really good at potty training and now all of a sudden everytime i leave he goes to the washroom inside always in the same spots, i understand the routine thing but i work on shifts and never the same please help me

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Try to keep that room shut and get the dog out often.

    I would also crate train!

    [Reply]

  55. cima Mehr says:

    How do you potty train an 11 years old Yorki? I have tried so many different ways it has been exhusting please let me know how.

    Thanks

    Cima Mehr

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Read the article. Age doesn’t matter except it will take longer because the bad habit is so set.

    [Reply]

    cima Mehr Reply:

    Thank you I am ready for this little challenge .

    [Reply]

  56. Sm says:

    Hi, We have an 8 week old puppy. Its crate trained and loves its crate and never has an accident in it. It is not going to be an inside dog, so very regularly we take it out of its crate put a leash on and take it outside to its toilet spot. It often pees after a short time, I say “do wees” and praise her etc. I then let her off the leash to play. About 2 minutes later she runs to another spot and pees again. So its not an accident but I would like her to only pee in her toilet spot and this is the only place I reward her. DO I just ignore the other times she pees? Also poos, she wont go in the spot, but I know she needs to go, if I let her off the leash, she runs and finds another spot – question do I stop her and pick her up and return her to the toilet spot? I have done this when I get to her before she poos but she then wont do it in the spot. I wait, let her off and she runs to another place in the garden and we repeat the process. I am happy to be patient and consistent but I also want to let her play – so if she always poos when play time starts – does that mean no play time until she works out to do it in her spot? Very confused and very much want to get it to work.

    [Reply]

  57. my puppy is 10 weeks old and we brought him home in a crate as it was a journey 1 and half hours he howled all way home, I tried to talk to him and ignored him to but he wouldn’t be quiet and now he hates the crate, we try leaving him to go in on his own but if we shut the door he howls again. the main concern is he will go all night with no mess, I take him out nearly every hour or so and he do his pee’s and poo’s out at times, but he will also do them indoors. there is no real time he does them. he tends to go in my hallway or living room, and we keep living room door closed until we go in together. when I see him sniffing I take him out but alas still don’t go sometime when we come in he will suddenly do it not sure what to do ??

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    search my articles for potty training, there are tons of free articles and a search bar at the top of this page

    [Reply]

  58. Steph Caddy says:

    I have a 15 weeks old miniature Daschund and she is very good at toileting in the dry. Now the weather has changed (cold and wet) we are back to stage 1 again with her toileting inside. She has two meals a day and I have gone back to limiting her water. Can you give any advice please? Many thanks.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    You have to wait her out in the wet and cold just like you did in the dry until she understand she has to go potty in order to come inside

    [Reply]

  59. Kathryn says:

    I have an 11 week old Shih Tzu. He has a crate in the utility room where he sleeps He doesn’t tend to pee and poop in there only at night.I let him in my kitchen and living room during the day. I supervise him and take him out at regular intervals,( he does do his business outside) however he still thinks it’s also OK to pee and poo in the kitchen and living room.
    When he looks like he is going to do something in the House I immediately take him outside sometimes he doesn’t do anything and then a few minutes later he has peed again. What should I do. I think I am trying to follow every rule praising him when he does it outside and showing I am cross when he does it inside. He even gets a treat when he toilets outside. What do I do.

    [Reply]

  60. Gina says:

    We just a 10 week oils Shia zu its been about 5 hours an no potty she ate food but drank no water she is playing & walking around should I be worried?

    [Reply]

  61. Raz says:

    i need help

    I have a 10 year old cocker spenial , this dog poop and pees only around where we sit outside and where my kids play. i cant even sit and relax outside without smelling his pee everyday.

    i trapped him in a 15 feet by 5 space for 3 to 4 days so he can learn that this is his location and he needs to do all his work here and I free him back in the back yard and still same thing. the spot i want him to poop and pee is the cleanest part of my backyard.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    You need to take him out on leash and condition the behavior of going to the place you want.

    I had a client that taught his dog to poop in a bucket. It wasn’t easy. He had to take the dog out on leash and only give him the option of the bucket until the dog was used to it as a habit. The behavior must become conditioned as a habit which requires your work!

    [Reply]

  62. Taruna says:

    My 5 month cocker spaniel is always put on leash and when we allow him to roam my he pees here and there. And also he puts whatever fits inside his mouth and eats It. He doesn’t like me chasing him so he bites by hand. That article of let your thief retrieve doesn’t work for him. And he had grown up but still bites us. Please help and reply
    Thanks

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    If he is on a leash why would you have to chase him?

    I recommend you sign up for our aggression coaching program. Email dana at info@thedogtrainingsecret.com to be put on the list

    [Reply]

  63. Stephanie says:

    I have an 8 month old Australian Shepard Lab mix, I am beyond frustrated with potty training. First, he wants to take off and chase anything that moves so I have to take him out on a leash cause I live in town and afraid he will get hit by a car when he runs out in the road. Second, he constantly whines CONSTANTLY, after he eats, after he goes outside, after he gets up from a nap, Constantly! When he was a little and we first brought him home, I limited his water due to puppies will drink and drink and potty potty… Well still I have to limit his water or he will just squat and pee where ever he would like…. And I take him out At least 15 times a day, and I am NOT exaggerating either… Dead serious… what more can I seriously do? Do you think there could be something wrong with him? I am beyond frustrated

    [Reply]

  64. Stacia says:

    My 13 week old puppy would run to the door when I’d say go outside potty. Now he doesn’t want to come to the door. What happened and how can I get him back to coming to the door?

    [Reply]

  65. Maria says:

    Oh wow my little Yorkie is 7 weeks I’m so wore out and have had him a week! I’m crate training and when I take him out he is so hyped he jumps runs won’t stay still on the puppy pad I’ve sit over a hour to try and get him to go. Please help he wants to run at me and play and will keep doing it even after a hour he keeps trying to play and when I turn my head after I sit for over a hour he goes!!! In the wrong place!! Help!!!

    [Reply]

  66. Jesseca says:

    I have a new puppy her name is Zoey she is 8 weeks old and she is part Chiwawa/Yorkie the people who had her did not let the pups outside at all to go to the bathroom, no puppy pads either..I am crate training her while I sleep and while I am at work…I feed her in the am and take her out frequently atleast 5-6 times before I go to work, but sometimes she does not go at all…however messes in her crate..so when I get home I have surprises sometimes in her crate! I again feed her a little at 5 too…same thing sometimes she goes outside sometimes no…I need help on what to do or what I am doing wrong..I don’t like her sitting around her duties 🙁

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    She is 8 weeks old and a baby. The problem is leaving her and expecting her to be able to hold it for long periods of time when she is so little.

    You need doggy day care or someone to come over and let her out

    [Reply]

  67. Matt says:

    5 month old pup still not house broken he is crated during day taken out every two hrs until bedtime fed exact time everyday and constantly goes in the house we really are starting to get overwhelmed as to what to do next. We have another dog who never makes a mess and we will take both out together so he can start figuring it out and alone but nothing is working please any advice would be greatly appreciated

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  68. Lynda williamson says:

    Help I’ve got a 17wk Yorkshire terrier she still won’t do the toilet outside take her out every few hours and keep her out as long as possible but nothing as soon as I bring her home she runs to her mat help it’s driving me mad will she ever do the toilet outside

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    If you do your part with following her around or crating her if you can’t watch her! Potty training is more about you than your puppy

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  69. Kat says:

    Almost a year old maltipoo. Will only pee on pee pad. When going driving and walking he wont drink, eat, or pee/poo in the car or outside. Will hold it until he gets back home. Its been 8 hours we been out today. How can i train hin that its ok to pee outside?

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  70. Jennifer says:

    We got a german sheperd puppy we have had him for about a month and we take him out he goes to the bathroom then bring him in and he pees again. We crate train him. he still

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  71. Josh says:

    I have a 9 month old lab mix and he will pee outside occasionally but mostly inside and I take him out he never poops outside I’m worried be I have a 6 week old rot mix and every time I take her out she potties with no problem and I’ve tried the crate and he will just potty in the crate he will not listen to anything we say he is just stubborn I hate calling my pup names but I think he is Satan’s spawn HELP!!!!!!

    [Reply]

  72. Charlene Ashford says:

    I have a 9week old Yorker. I am trying to potty pad train her. How often do I need to take her to the potty pad to per and also poop?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I am not a fan of potty pads at all

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  73. Monissa says:

    My dog goes out every two hours and still has accidents he is 9 weeks im thinking maybe because he has pulpy pads in his cage at night this is why he does that should I do away with the puppy pads?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I hate puppy pads. But also this is a 9 week old puppy. Just like all babies don’t potty train at exactly the same time, neither do all puppies. Some take longer to gain bladder control, etc.

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  74. Kristine says:

    almost 12 week house training puppy knows to go to the door and bark to go out and go to the bathroom. But every 10 -15 she does to the door and barks and just goes out there to lay in the grass and or eat things like rocks and twigs. I want to know when I should ignore her barking at the door because I know she already went. I’m worried she is gonna go in the house if I dont bring her everytime even though she went 15 minutes earlier. She has me trained! How do I stop the habit if she really doesnt HAVE to go?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Pick your battles at this age. It might be better to let her out frequently than to deny her and then force her to go potty indoors.

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  75. Elena says:

    Hello . My Pomeranian is 4 months old and he will not go toilet outside when I take him for a walk but he will do it as soon as we get home on his potty pad . Sometimes he will do wee wee in the backyard if I tell him to but not number 2 . I’ve tried different ways and I can’t do it . How can I get out of his mind that toilet is outside and not on the pad . Please help

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  76. Sue says:

    I have a 4 1/2 month female boxer/pit mix. She sometimes growls at us in the house and we say no! and growl back louder. She still does it. Sometimes outdoors she will growl at me while on her leash I say no! Then change subject and tell her lets go home! She runs home! How do i stop the growling? She will also jump after growling and try to nip at my leg or hand. What should I be doing?
    Thanks!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    This can be a very serious behavior and a very bad sign at this age. I recommend finding a boarded veterinary behaviorist before this behavior gets worse and she bites someone.

    [Reply]

  77. Angel Lopez says:

    I just got a 9 week old Boston Terrier. I’m so scared to take him outside because he only has his first set of shots. Is it ok for him to be outside. Also when l do take him out and it’s cold he won’t move. He just sits and shakes like if he is freezing cold. I got him a coat but he still does the same thing. What should l do? How can l get him to walk when it’s cold. Will he get sick. PLEASE SOMEONE HELP ME. I THANK YOU IN ADVANCE.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    take him to a safe place to go potty. My yard is safe and free from disease. I wouldn’t take a puppy that wasn’t fully vaccinated to a dog park or places that a lot of dogs frequent.

    He is going to have to learn to get used to the cold. Get him a coat or just let him acclimate.

    [Reply]

  78. Alana gonzalez says:

    Hey… so I have a puppy of 9 weeks and he’s a sheepadoodle (old English sheep dog mixed with poodle) we tried crate training him the first night we got him.. but that didn’t work well. He pooped all in his crate so we gave up on crate training. Instead we have him in a small gate. He sleeps there and we take him out every couple of hours. We do let him have access to the house but he’s pooping and peeing everywhere! Even when we take him outside and supervise him he still won’t go pee! We don’t know what to do and we are trying to crate train him again. Any changed we should make other than what we’re starting to change?

    [Reply]

  79. Wanda Wells says:

    Have a 9week old GS. Started out great, go to door waiting on his leash to go out and potty. Peed last night in his grate. Should a pup have any type of bedding in his grate or wait until potty trained to add something soft to lay on.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    He doesn’t need anything soft to lay on, it isn’t worth risking that he may shred or eat it.

    [Reply]

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