Teach Your Dog to Come When Called, No Matter What!

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teach your dog to come every time, puppy training, pitbull training

Sometimes I think I am a Golden Retriever, everything is exciting to me, everything is fun, everything should be a game and everything is important, but I guess I am blonde.

I giggle when I look back at my dog training videos and my articles because to me EVERYTHING is critical!  Teaching your dog to come, to leave it, crate training, leash training everything is vital to you and your dog.  And, to be honest, it really is.  All dog training and the victory over behavior problems ensures that you keep your dog and that you both remain happy.

But, Teaching Your Dog To Come Is The Most Important
Dog Obedience Command Every Dog Should Know

Does Your Dog Come When Called?

So what happens if your dog is off leash, he sees a bunny or a deer and goes chasing after it?  Will he leave that distraction and come to you when you call him?  What if there is a car coming?

Recently a good friend lost his world champion obedience dog because he was chasing deer and was blindsided by a car.  I am still devastated for them both.  It can certainly happen to anyone who’s dog is off leash, and I can only hope and train hard and pray it never happens to me or my dogs.

How To Teach Your Dog To Come When You Call

puppy training

Are you FUN to Come to?

You HAVE to train, train, train for a good recall!  This is not something to let slack or ignore, this is THE MOST IMPORTANT thing you will ever do!  Your dog’s life may sometime depend on this exact command!

NEVER, ever call your dog when he is in trouble, your mad or if you are going to do something bad to him!  His name and the word “come” should never mean something bad.  So if he is in trouble go and get him.  If you are going to crate him or trim his nails, go to him, but do not call him.

You never want your dog’s name or come to = something bad or even slightly negative.  Imagine your dog and the bunnies…if “COME” means sometimes he goes in his crate, then there is NO WAY he is leaving those bunnies to come to you!

Would you come to YOU if you were mad or sounded that angry?

When You Call Your Dog It Should Mean FUN, FOOD, and PARTIES!

Does your dog drop everything and run to you when he hears the cookie jar rattle?  When you whisper “cookie” would he wake up from a dead sleep to rush to your side?  Why is it that he listens so well to the rattle of the treat bag or a word that means treat?

Because with 100% reliability you are going to give him a treat!  How often do you get into the dog biscuits but then don’t give him one?  Or ask him if he wants a cookie only to give him nothing?  Chances are you don’t.  Chances are you reward him and so he is familiar with the reward that is tied to the sound or the word.  If these things were not paired with something good or a treat, he would stop coming and they would stop being meaningful cues.

You must make sure that your command to “come” = something meaningful and good almost 100%  of the time!

Pair the word come with treats, with games and with jackpots of chicken breast and other wonderful things.  Don’t call your dog and then take for granted the fact that he actually came to you.  And, just know that your praise is never going to be as exciting or as motivating as a scuttling or taunting squirrel. However the knowledge that FOR SURE you are going to be rewarded and you might get some chicken breast is often worth the gamble for your dog!

puppy training

Look at it from his perspective and stop comparing him to “Lassie”.  Dogs want to fulfill their own needs, what is important is to pair what he likes with what you want!

My favorite way to teach my dog to come is to play hide and seek at home.  Games are FUN!  I don’t care if you are 80 or 20 or if you do or don’t have kids at home.  You need to PLAY with your dog in order to teach him you are fun!  Just like you play with your children or grandchildren; sometimes you have to step out of your comfort zone because it is important for the dog or the child!

Have someone (your spouse, friend or your child) hold your dog’s collar as you tease him with some treats and dash away to hide.  First hide in easy to find places and as he gets better you can truly “hide” and make him find you behind doors, in his crate or other silly places.  As you call him praise him, this is critical even though you can’t see him coming you must assume that he is scampering after you so continue your praise.

“Fury COME, good girl, good girl, Come, good girl” until she gets to me.

“Fury COME!”  just isn’t motivating or exciting and she is likely to get bored and stop coming.  I have to motivate her to me and make it FUN!  The teasing and dashing is also important.  Just showing your dog a treat and sauntering off, is boring.

Which would you prefer?  Now which would you prefer if you were 5?  Remember your dog has the mentality of a child and needs fun and games!

Once he is finding you with exhilarating excitement in your home, all over your home, in funny places (yes I think dogs have a sense of humor), it is time to move this game outside.

Get a long line of 25 or 50 feet and play the same game; dashing behind trees and bushes.  Hide up inside trees or underneath things like your car; make this game the most fun thing your dog has ever done!    This imprinting of FUN, FUN, FUN along with reliable treats means your dog will be more likely to automatically leave the bunny, squirrel or deer to rush to your side when you call him!

It isn’t enough to teach this or play this once or twice, you MUST continue to play this game throughout your dog’s life.  Once it is imprinted and he is enjoying it, you can play it less but play it occasionally to keep it sharp and reliable.  If you notice him not coming to you when called go back to making it FUN and playing!

What Not To Do?

puppy training

Don’t Call Him if He won’t Come!

Don’t call your dog when he is in trouble or you’re going to do something negative to him.  I know I said it before but it begs to be repeated!  This will RUIN this command’s reliability!

Don’t be boring!  If you are boring your dog is less likely to listen!!  Dogs often mirror our behavior so the more excited and animated you are the more likely your dog will be to listen and enjoy himself.  Even if it is out of your comfort zone, get animated and have fun!

NEVER, EVER call your dog if you think he won’t come and you have no physical control of him (unless it is an emergency).

If your dog ignores you don’t give him the opportunity to ignore your commands!  This goes for any command but especially the COME command.  If your dog ignores you and doesn’t come, this means the command means NOTHING to your dog and nothing happens to him to make him come.

The more often you call him and he ignores you, the more the command loses its meaning and the less likely he is to ever come.  This is one of the 5 training pitfalls for training your dog to come that you need to avoid.

Instead, put him on a leash and work on the command by playing games OR at least put him on a leash so that if he ignores you, you can then make him listen by reeling him in!

You may have to slowly work on the command so that he listens off leash in a safe area like your yard, or a fenced in area.  When he doesn’t listen go to him, clip on the leash and encourage him to listen to you by restricting his ability to run away and by encouraging him with treats, toys and fun.

It is much easier to teach him this is fun, than to rely on force!

As always have as much fun as possible, this is what bonds you to your dog and your dog to you!  But work hard so that, if that moment comes and your dog’s life hangs in the balance he has a desire to play and to please you and leave any distraction behind!

 

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There are 168 Comments

  1. Linda Thompson says:

    Do you have any suggestions as fun games for women in a scooter with an energetic Goldendoodle? Spirit is 4 years old and I have trained him as my service dog. Most people see him as well trained, but I feel we have areas that could be improved, including the come command. However, we live in a mobile home and there aren’t many places for me and my scooter to hide. He loves balls and squeaky toys. I don’t throw balls well, so I just bought an automatic ball thrower. He needs to put the ball in my lap before I put a ball in the machine. I am hoping this will strengthen our bond. As he brings the ball to me, I say “come.” Can you suggest any other fun games we might try?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    There are all kinds of things you can do 😉 I use to train service dogs! Go out on your scooter and hide his toys around the mobile home park and let him look for and sniff for them, you can also play this game inside.

    while he is heeling next to your scooter back it up and call him to come.

    work on his retrieve with other more complicated objects to pick up.

    and, go out and buy a trick book and train him to do all kinds of silly party tricks! You will both love it!

    [Reply]

    Linda Thompson Reply:

    Thanks for the suggestions. Will give them a try. Spirit loves playing and learning new things.

    [Reply]

  2. Laura says:

    Thank you for this very informative article. This is definitely the most important command and your writing the blog reminded me how much more we need to work on it than we do. Gotta go play.

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  3. Barbara says:

    You’re brilliant !!!

    [Reply]

  4. jeannie says:

    I’m curious about the emphasis on rewarding EVERY time – nonscheduled intermittent positive reinforcement has been shown to produce the most consistent results in all animals. It’s why gamblers continue to gamble in Las Vegas, it’s why people stay in bad relationships, and it’s why your dog will come to you on command even if you don’t have a chicken breast in your pocket on that particular day.

    The emphasis on never associating a negative reinforcement though is right on – negative reinforcers are not very effective at best and shouldn’t ever follow any desired behavior. Can you imagine the confusion in your dog’s mind if sometimes “come” means a cookie and sometimes it means you get your nails clipped?

    So with my dogs, a lot of the time they get “thank you” or “good” when they come on command with a rub on the head, and sometimes they get a treat or a more enthusiastic response. All of them have good recall skills. Most (5 out of 7) will drop stay on command even if they’re chasing. The problem with consistent positive reinforcement is that then the one time you don’t have the treat, you’ve in effect provided a negative consequence by disappointing your dog’s expectations. If the goodies happen some of the time, your dog will stay optimistic that today might be their lucky day.

    It’s the same reason that although only sometimes when I open the closet where the treats are stored I am getting out treats, they optimistically all run to the door with me EVERY time.

    What do you think about this?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I agree with this type of training and I LOVE intermittent reinforcement and have written many articles on it.

    But its like saying “cookie” or “treat” and having your dog wake up for a dead sleep or bolt away from anything he is doing because he knows 100% you are going to give him one, that is what I want for most people to aim for. Like the jingle of the car keys and touching his leash mean you are taking him for a ride! There are certain behaviors that they are conditioned to know that there will always be a fun reinforcer, and that is what I want COME to mean!

    [Reply]

    Liz Reply:

    If you are thinking “nonscheduled intermittent positive reinforcement has been shown to produce the most consistent results in all animals,” but that the “problem with consistent positive reinforcement is that then the one time you don’t have the treat, you’ve in effect provided a negative consequence by disappointing your dog’s expectations” then I really can’t get my head around that because it is really just a 99% of the time positive intermittent reinforcement schedule. Since perfection won’t be achieved, even striving for a 100% reinforcement will still likely be slightly intermittent. I wouldn’t say do that high of reward repetition with any other command, but with getting my dog’s to come, they will often come and then run back off immediately so the “throwing a party” tactic has become invaluable with them. I have also seen newbies to he Las Vegas Method attempting to treat every 6th or 20th time (ie at a much too infrequent rate for the dog) or fail to take distractions into account with their treat amounts and frequencies. I feel this article does try to by-pass those issues in the described methods.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Thank you! This is exactly what I mean. We can never get 100% but if we strive for that for this one command our training will benefit!

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    chris F Reply:

    Many times I found if I do a training session i am completely 100% reinforcing her with a treat, if treats get boring I buy a newer taster smaller or bigger colorful treat. Sometimes I get a back of chix livers cut them up dry in oven and she bows the knee every time to my commands. after about 3 yrs I stopped the consistent training and made everything intermittent, after 3 months no treats, she lost the 4 lbs over weight and now I’ve gone back to a once a week training and she never knows when I’m giving the new treat. or liver. She responds very fast. The smarter she gets the more she reasons and the better you have to be at being on your toes to keep her trained up. hope this helped. most times I just use the kong frisbee and she runs quickly to get the opportunity to run after it and retrieve it. She always seems to bring it home when I call.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Never treat 100% of the time unless your dog is learning!

    Otherwise treat only sometimes and jackpot (use bigger or better treats) occasionally. This makes it more exciting and trains a dog better 🙂

    Paula Reply:

    Dogs are very intelligent creatures. Honestly, they can smell the treat before you ever present it.
    The confusion factor can be reduced by how you present the treat-what you are reinforcing.
    Dogs are very perceptive and if you treat the moment they come to you, they get it. However, if you wait until after the desired command is executed, then you’ve lost that window of opportunity and here is where things get confusing for the dog.
    If you treat for X behavior CONSISTENTLY and at the moment it is executed, this is successful. You have to keep your commands clean as well as your body language every time you ask something of your dog. It’s like saying one thing and doing another!
    However, if you treat inconsistently, such as skipping a treat, then you will fail your dog.
    As your dog gets consistent in recalls you slowly wean them off a treat every time and you make the task at hand a little more difficult or fun.
    If you were doing a job for me and I only paid you when I felt like it, would you continue to work for me?
    I bet not.
    However, if I upped your pay or told all my friends how wonderful a job you’ve done, and got you more work as a result, you would probably do a great job for me and keep checking back to me for more work.
    This is why clicker training is so effective. It marks the behavior at the moment the desired command is executed by the dog.
    What Chet is talking about is the Premack Principle. Look it up or ask him to explain it more to you. He is really a good trainer and these methods really work.
    I no longer train professionally due to burn out but keep up with his lessons to keep current.
    Best of luck to you.

    [Reply]

    jeannie Reply:

    Thank you for your thoughtful answers. I’m already very familiar with the Premack Principle, but I’m sure someone else will benefit from your mentioning it, and when you talk about slowly weaning off the reward or making the task more difficult I think you are saying the same thing I am.
    I also very much like the “throw a party” tactic and I’ve always instinctively used that.
    And Chet, I completely agree about recall being an essential command to have 100% compliance with. In addition to working on perfect recall skills, I hope people keep their dogs on leads unless they are either in a securely fenced area or hiking far away from any roads, even with PERFECT recall!

    [Reply]

    gianfranco Reply:

    …From my side, it is easy to relate to having burnout, I’m at the point of no return just about…however, just previous to having her last 2 puppies (all premature) , delivered via cesarean, Precious (Fem Beagle, possibly under 2 years old) picked up one of the newborns and walked towards me, looking at my eyes like asking “what am I supposed to do with this???
    My commitment was definately reinforced and every frustration clinging in my mind disapears when purpoesly recalled. Having just burnout of Nursing (Registered Nurse 12 years) and finding precious at 11:59 pm day of my birthday on my front yard, spending 3 hours to gain her trust offering food and water, I took on the responsability even though it was obvious that she has major behavioral problems.
    Anyway, that partial biography of the past 4.5 months, was to let be known I love my 7 dogs and one cat, all rescued: so much that I’ve been with them almost 24/7, not even giving thought to my career or applying for any kind of work, Them in my couch and around me, previously in my bed, I want them with me, Touching me.

    [Reply]

    gianfranco Reply:

    ..me again…Question is: is it possible to recuperate dogs with bad habit well engrained in their brains? I have tried everything feasible to me but even having them separated by training (other fem Lucy Lu left with me annanounced, afraid, skittish but responds to commands), most of the time the mother breaks the training by showing bad behavior to the pups, specially peeing and pooping.
    Believe me, tried so many options but last night I had enough of sitting on peed couches and stepping on land mines. So, from my room they have been moved to the kitchen, then the living room and back and forth on every new strategy, to no avail. Not to mention the $ spent for breaking dishes, chewing on stereo systems, etc.
    Moved them all except for Lucy and the cat), this time to the tool-motorcycle room, 10-15 degrees colder than the rest of the house. Pondering on installing a dog door to the backyard after fencing backyard (live in the Cherokee National Park boundaries).HELP miss them already! I wish them by my side but it’s proven just about impossible to retrain and retrain and retrain, I’m short on $ (vaccines purchased online but need heartworm and rabies still), I’m not 20 years old anymore to go up hills so steep that I can only get up there with soccer shoes to retrieve the pups following the mother on her usual “escape” after digging out or finding a spot where my 1-acre fence might have been hit by falling debri overnight) and -across the street- looking for the rabbitt: they are too smart for their own good, Precious now screams and howls when, any pup tries to play with her (I’ve been cleaning butts since 3-weeks old when Precious desisted.) or when something is being asked of her.
    Well, guessing I’ve bored you enough, for this is just the tip of the iceberg, point is, after all, that I am getting mental therapy by writing this however, I would like to commend you, all of you for taking care of “our younger sibblings” God only knows we need more of you.
    Wish you all best of luck hoping the feeling is mutual.
    Gianfranco Maria Luciano Capasso.

    [Reply]

  5. Maxine says:

    I agree, my Labradoodle will come when called but does not always get a treat but does always get some kind of acknowledgment that he has done good.

    [Reply]

  6. Beth Grace says:

    Love your suggestions, thankyou. I have a 5 month old boxer puppy called Indi. What do i say when i want her to come because I need to put her in an enclosed pen. She doent like going in there and I often will give her a treat to get her in there? Many thanks

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Go to her and get her instead of calling her!

    [Reply]

    Elizabeth Reply:

    Could you not call her to come to you… Treat her immediately with praise then wait a moment to move to the pen or would she still associate “come” with going in the pen?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    You run the risk that she will associate the two together unless there are a few things that happen in between. Dogs are great about association and behavior chaining and so she might get the idea that the two things go hand in hand. I would go and get her, or give her another command that means come so you will go in your crate like “Kennel” but have a GREAT treat like chicken breast and give it to her everytime she goes in. My dogs want to go to bed at 8 or earlier because they know when we go to bed they get chicken strips!

    Sherri Carranza Reply:

    I just have to say kennel up and all 6 of my dogs go to their own crates
    Or kennel. I taught them that by saying kennel up and once they were
    Where they were suppose to be I then gave them the treat. Took 3 days
    For them to learn it. Off of treats within 2 weeks. Now all it takes is kennel
    Up and your a good girl or boy and they are all happy. I just wish that I
    Could get them to obey the come command this well. My male looses his
    Mind and is off on his own little adventure. Most of the time so wound up
    That he either doesnt hear me or refuses to listen. Does great in my house
    And fenced in back yard, but anywhere else im starting to feel like its a lost
    Cause to even try the come command. I know thats a bad attitude to have
    But you eventually have to sit back and look at what and how your doing
    Things. Somewhere I not my dog but myself am doing something wrong
    Somewhere. Now looking for good advice. Thank Minette.

    Minette Reply:

    Hey Sherri!

    Not that you want to spend your life reading my articles but here is one on off leash obedience http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/leash-obedience-mysteries-solved/

    and some others on training in drive. I know you have “working dogs” so I don’t know how much of this you know, but it never hurts to reread or reiterate 🙂

    http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/building-dogs-drive/

    http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/training-dog-drive/

  7. Louise says:

    My 4 yr old Bull terrier comes most of the time. He’s great at sit, stay, left paw, right paw, wave, lie, roll etc but I had been tricking myself that his stubborn nature keeps him from coming back all the time but that’s a lie, out on walks I’ve been boring! We now run around and hide inside the house and out on walks. He loves it and so do I! I feel like he enjoys spending time with me now wherever we are. My friend has a 16month old bully who’s deaf. She has decided to get her a vibrating collar to get her attention but are there any more games that you could advise that would help to train a deaf dog to come?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Tapping her food on the ground and rewarding the dog when he looks up and comes is another way to communicate with deaf dogs.

    [Reply]

  8. Mariane says:

    Thanks for the info. I appreciate your blog so much and it helps believe me
    Thanks Chet!

    [Reply]

  9. Frank says:

    My Doggy was Naughty the other morning. after he had the op to go outside and I wanted to take a short nap before actually awaking for the day, he did business right in front of me. Obviously, )like a child. or at one time a child got spank for misbehaving).. my dog got spank. and you know what, it worked. I anticipate that it likewise will not be a repeated behavior pattern.

    I know, I have read not to hit your dog. I estimate how its handle. actually, my dog is actually well behave, and had to get the bugs out of his training to go outside.

    When my Housemate and I are gone for the day, my dog have cooperative to go inside his crate. and does not even whine, until we come home. then by all means he wants out. his tail goes nuts.

    I had this Bark Buster Trainer Idiot telling me that I was not following his Instruction when it came to my Pug before he pass-away after only 18 months. anyway. he did not understand that Pugs are impossible to make them cooperative. yes, I was the leader, but the commands did not always worked.

    The idiot also said not to let your dog sleep on your bed. Of course. pending on the dog. My have and will always sleep on my bed with his Dad. also, its a short cut, if he needs to go outside at a wired hr.

    My Dog now is a Beagle that I got from the Animal Shelter.
    and this guy picked me out. it was love at first sight.

    Even at the Pet store. I held a Pug., he too wanted to go home. after having the last one pass-away. and had just rap up his brief prayer service. it was too hard to get another Pug.

    This Dog now obeys rather well. I have to wait until spring to take him for a walk, as today, its rather chilly out.

    Again, my dog now only got spank once, and it worked. that’s all it takes. catching him again, he will understand that its time to go outside.

    Tip, through there are Condos that permits dog. and my last place through the Patio door only, my disagreement is their if the patio door is full of snow. or some short of Emergency to the Vet,

    Tip, if you want a Dog, as we are all dog lovers here. check the Restrictions on condos that may or may not permit dogs. and where the dog is and not permitted.

    Some Hotels now accepts dog. Obviously, not in the food area and pool area. other dog lover. remember to clean up after your friend. its the Law. and if even one dog lover dis-obeys. then more restriction is put on. such as only so many dogs permitted in the hotel.and or no longer permitting dogs, unless seeing eye dogs.

    all in all, I have a very lovable behaved dog. the worst part of his training is over, as fair as his business out of doors.
    one must keep taking him to the door to got outside. and make him go outside for a few minutes. until the bark gets to you.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I can never condone spanking or hitting as we are the thinking animal and should use our minds to get our dogs to do what we want!

    [Reply]

    Frank Reply:

    I was patient enough. as indicated, I am sure that it likely will not be a behavior pattern problem.

    Of course. we never want to hit our dogs. and once will do it. never or ever abuse.

    The next time it happens, he will give me a long look, and spear me by not hitting me again.

    [Reply]

    jeannie Reply:

    Anything that you could describe as “spanking” is already way off track. I’m not implying that it is abusive, only that it is not necessary ever and not the way you want your dog to see you.

    If the barking is your cue that your dog is done being outside, that means that you are not outside with your dog, is that correct? If you go with your dog and give praise for doing their business in the right place and clean up right then, in front of the dog, they will pick up on that right away. Don’t let them watch you clean up inside, but don’t punish. If your dogs are not crate trained, that’s a really great place to start – I’ve never had a dog who would soil an appropriately sized crate. They are den animals and will take care of their own space. When you take the dog out, they go outside immediately; when they do what they need to then they can be out in the home with you. I promise you this will work.

    But please, do not hit/spank/physically reprimand your dog. You want a dog to be obedient out of love, respect and cooperation, not out of fear. Ultimately you will have a much better behaved dog.

    [Reply]

    GBM Reply:

    This man crated his pug all day? He hit the puppy as well? …and it died. This has made me sick and disgusted. Anyone who has ever owned a pug knows that the dog has to go out many times a day and will damage their systems by painfully holding on to their urine. This is abuse, I cannot believe this is posted on a dog training blog.

    [Reply]

  10. Karen says:

    If your puppy is running off with something that he has got into in his mouth, what do you call in trying to get him to come with the “forbidden” article? His goal is to get your attention and “try to get it” and taking it away is not waht he wants.

    TY

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Exchange the article for a treat or a toy or something else your dog wants. At this point you have lost the battle.

    In order to keep this from happening keep your forbidden articles out of his reach and/or keep him on a leash so when he darts away with them you will have him without the play and chase game.

    Its the “chase” game that he wants so don’t give in or you are rewarding him!!

    [Reply]

    jeannie Reply:

    Teach your puppy the “leave it” command. Start with the puppy on a lead, walk past the desirable but forbidden object and when the dog moves toward the object, give a tug and say “leave it” – rinse and repeat until the dog responds to the leave it command with no tugging necessary. Then do the same thing off lead. After a lot of practice and some rewards for the good behavior your dog will understand that some things are not okay for play.

    I had a hound (vizsla) who pinned a squirrel against our fence (without harming it!) and responded to this command perfectly – after giving me the dirtiest look she could muster…

    [Reply]

  11. alex says:

    My German Shephard completely ignores anything ,treets, when he chasses other dogs or animals. He is only one year old, very clever othervise, but I can’t stop him. I have tried many things, but nothing seems to work

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    All dogs have a motivator you just have to find what your dog wants and be it or control his access to it.

    [Reply]

    Jamie Reply:

    Do you have any other suggestions for motivators besides food or games. I have a 1 year old boxer and food works perfectly for her as long as there are no people or dogs around. I have tried toys and games and being very enthusiastic and playing with her but I just can’t seem to make myself more interesting to her than that dog over there or the person on the other side of the street. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    You must have 95% reliability and compliance in the house first, then go to a more distracted environment, then more and more until finally you try to tackle a dog environment. You may just have to back up and go further away until you get your dog’s attention and then slowly work your way closer and closer to the distraction while keeping your dog’s focus.

  12. marc jung says:

    My dog Piro will usually stay around when I let him off leash he will go out of sight and come back to see where Iam everytime he comes tome I give him atreat occasoinally he will not listen

    [Reply]

  13. Marcia says:

    I have a 4 yr old rescue Shih-Tzu. When we first got her she wouldn’t leave our side and when I said “come” she was right there. Now that we have had her for 6 months, she is becoming very independent and roams the house, etc. Now, when I say “come” she just looks at me and doesn’t respond. What can I do to break this habit?

    [Reply]

  14. Jude LeMoine says:

    A useful article and the responses to comments are also ‘spot on’! I especially like the “… all dogs have a motivator…”

    [Reply]

  15. Rose says:

    thank you for the reminder of the no scold on come… I have a 14yr old labrador that decides to go deaf to my calls of come when he has sites on something more fun than me.

    he knows when he eventually does come to me he will still get that treat. So he sometimes takes the long way back to me. And if I go and get him he will (if he sees me) go the other way to avoid being put back on the leash. So are you saying that if I know he won’t come back to me don’t call at all? or call once no response go and get him?

    I will do the play and reward … my only issue is they are labs (i have three of them) so if I play and treat then they will expect treats every time I play with them. Which is a lot!

    3 choc lab mommie

    [Reply]

  16. Allen Litten says:

    We have a rescue Schipperke from a puppy mill, She had spent her first
    years without any human contact and having puppies. She is afraid of everyting-every noise and us if we are standing. If we are seated, she will come to me. any suggestions?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    slowly start to stand as she gets closer and only reward while you are standing

    [Reply]

  17. DIAN says:

    iT iNFURIATES ME WHEN ANYONE SMACKS OR INTENTIONALLY HURTS AN ANIMAL. eSPECIALLY WHEN HE HAS AN ACCIDENT BECAUSE HIS OWNER WASNT QUICK ENOUGH TO LET HIM OUT SO ITS THE OWNERS FAULT NOT THE DOG HOW LONG AND HOW WAS HE SUPPOSED TO HOLD UT ANYWAY? mY GOD iTS LIKE HITTING A BABY BECAUSE THATS HOW MUCH THEY TRUST YOU TO LOVE AND CARE FOR THEM.sOMETIMES WHEN MY oLIVER WONT COME INSIDE BECAUSE i THINK HE ENJOYS SEEING ME FREEZE WHILE HE IS HAVING FUN ROLLING IN THE SNOW AFTER DOING HIS BUSINESS i MIGHT HAVE TO CHASE HIM IN WEARING MY SLIPPERS OF COURSE bUT I WOULDNT DREAM OF HURTING HIM i MIGHT YELL oLIVER NOW -DOESNT ALWAYS WORK. sO i WILL USE TREAT METHOD WHICH i DO WHEN HE TAKES OFF WITH SMEONES SMELLY SOCK TO CHOMP ON UNDER THE TABLE i EXCHANGE WITH A TREATi hE KNOWS TO GO INTO HIS CRATE IN THE BACK SEAT OF MY CAR BECAUSE iTRY ALWAYSTO PUT A TREAT IN THERE NOW i DONT ALWAYS BUT i PRAISE HIM i SWEAR HE GRINS AT ME AND SETTLES DOWN ONTO HIS CUSHION WITHOUT A MURMER NEEDLESS TO SAY ON A HOT OR COLD DAY i ONLY TAKE HIM FOR WALKS I WOULD NEVER LEAVE HIM IN THE CAR I OFTEN THINK PEOPLE WHO WANT TO HAVE AN ANIMAL NEED A PHSYCOLOGY TEST TO ENSURE THE ANIMALS SAFETY.

    [Reply]

  18. DIAN says:

    sORRY i REPEATED MYSELF YOU CAN BE SURE I WONT BE WRITING ANY COMMENTS AFTER THAT CORRECTION

    [Reply]

  19. mary says:

    thanks for the info he can be in his own little word some time but now i can work on this he only come when he wants to and he here you calling him thanks agin

    [Reply]

  20. Dawn says:

    I have a 6 year old Super-Smart Schipperke that worships the ground i walk on and cannot stand to be away from me EXCEPT if he knows I am leaving him to go to work, he will run out the door if he can and I have to hunt him down to put him back in the house – or if he finds the electronic gate (surrounding the property) open or happens to find a new hole in the fence. I know he hates being alone all day when there are other dogs outside having fun – he demonstrated this by climbing up on a bookshelf to get high enough to chew a hole in the side of a window air conditioner vent to get outside! But I am hesitant to put in a doggy door because there is another home on the property and there are always people coming and going through the gate. There are also two other large dogs – a super sweet well-behaved pit bull and another new rescue dog who gets into mischief and takes off every chance she gets as well. I know my schip is smart enough to learn to come, he has done this many times – but if he thinks I am leaving him its another story – Every other time I call “come” to him or give some other command,he JUMPS to attention in a heartbeat – he can hardly wait to respond. I can even whisper his name and from across the room he will zoom at top speed to me and stare deeply into my eyes with anticipation until I give the command – so he is just being stubborn so I am uncertain how to correct this behavior with standard techniques.

    [Reply]

  21. Cynthia says:

    I had a naughty dog who crossed an extremely busy street who’s first AKC obedience score was a 198 out of 200. He was playing with the neighbor dog. I felt it was too dangerous to call him to me. I used the down stay hand signal and vocal command like he was in trouble. He dropped like a nucular bomb was going to hit and stayed until I came to get him. Before he got into the road if we had noticed him I would have called him back to me. I am so glad he knew both comands because no matter how normally well behaved your dog is…there are emergencies.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    This is what I do with my dogs on the beach!

    [Reply]

  22. Chris says:

    This is definitely something that is an issue for myself and my 9 month old cattle dog. All the games and such work great at home, and there has been an improvement with recall when he’s woofing at the possums at the back fence, but…on our oval I have real problems if there is the slightest distraction… And I have played games with him there…Achilles is a super friendly dog and just wants to meet and greet everyone and thing he sees. The other day he managed to turn around after starting to race to the opposite side of the oval …wanting to play with friends of ours…unfortunately another dog, with no owner in sight, came loping past from behind me, saw Achilles and bolted, and so did Achilles, out the gate, over the road and around the corner. Thankfully he popped back around the corner and he finally came to me. However, it has given me a huge fright, and while he needs space to run, I’m almost too afraid to let him off at all.

    [Reply]

  23. jennifer t. says:

    01/18/12
    Hi love your dog training sessions! I had an 8 year old yorkypoo. in 2008 i had a near fatal car accident then my husband died suddenly from a heart attack. ever since these events my Charlie won’t sit on my lap or come when i call him. i miss him being on my lap. Any suggestions?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    He may have known you were injured and didn’t want to hurt you at the time and it became more of a habit.

    Encourage him back with his food at night and treats and then extend the time you are rewarding him so that he will stay longer!

    [Reply]

  24. Julie says:

    I have ALOT of dogs come and go through my rescue.At times as many as 15.I have never consciously worked on a method to get them to come to me but RARELY has one ignored me once they learn their name. They just come to me.I had a roommate who had 3 dogs. And all three of her dogs absolutely would not come to her off leash out side EVER. It was so bad that I had to fence in the back yard because I was tired of chasing her dogs all around the neighborhood in my car. She never tried to correct or improve the behaviors, and my dogs were no longer able to enjoy the acres of running they had as soon as they hit the door. I think it had to do with the dogs not respecting or acknowledging her as the leader in the home. She indulged them, and allowed them to chew on furniture and whatever else was laying around including my furniture. They were never corrected or trained for anything including walking on a leash without choking themselves nearly unconscious. Just an observation I have made.So the part about making them think coming when called is a great thing I agree with. Her dogs for whatever reason thought coming back was a bad thing, or behaved like spoiled children. My dogs in a pack will all come back off leash in a group to a call I make like come on!…and they all come running back…some slower than others but they all come.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    If you get all the treats and affection you desire for no reason at all and there are never any rules, there is no reason to listen to commands and inconvenience yourself 😉

    [Reply]

  25. Julie says:

    Thanks, Chet, for this fabulous article! After I read it, I played hide and seek with my iggy and my minpin. Treats were involved… Now they are peacefully sleeping…yes in my bed, that is as much for my comfort as theirs. I appreciate the training on come, as “Dash”, my Italian greyhound as gotten out twice and my biggest fear was that he would dash into traffic. Great stuff !! My question is dash is rep, is he too old for the puppy training?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    They are NEVER too old for training!! I still train my 12 year old dog to do new things!

    [Reply]

  26. Trevor & Annie says:

    We have a 3 month old toy poodle, that we received from the breeder 2 weeks ago. We live in a new hi rise building in a 2 bedroom unit with lots of carpet and some tiled areas.

    Our propblem is toilet training. At night her “crate’ area is the small tiled laundry with a baby gate to keep her in. We have her potty tray there and a water bowl and some kibble in a bowl with her bed for the night. She uses the potty for a No 1 and sometimes a No 2.

    During the day she is leashed to a tiled area by the front door of the unit.
    The leash allows the full run of the small tiled area which has the potty tray and away from that is the water bowl & food bowl and her bed.
    .
    Any time she wants to use the potty she does, and so what is the problem!

    The problem is when she is off leash and playing games together, practicing commands etc (early days of course) she will relieve herself anywhere on our new carpet in a flash, instead of returning to her potty tray!
    We are reluctant to let her off until we see No 1 & No 2 and so spends most of her time leashed! Suggestions???

    [Reply]

  27. Casey says:

    How do you handle working with an outside 5 month old german shorthair hunting dog who is in an outside kennel, who will not come to you when it is time to go back to the kennel or to come to you when you are done playing and he needs to be put on the leash or put back into the truck after hunting.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Spend more time training with him and more time with him on a long line.

    He doesn’t want to come to you because he doesn’t want the isolation in his kennel. He would rather run around and ignore you or BETTER spend time with you.

    Get him really tired by spending a lot of time with him and then because he is on a leash or a long line it won’t be a stretch to put him back in his kennel.

    But, ultimately I believe a 5 month old puppy should be indoors!

    [Reply]

  28. Lynne ELkins says:

    I loved this article. My dog (toy poodle) always comes with a treat. He does not always come otherwise. I try to be happy and cheerful. I will try the new way and hope for better results. I love your publications.
    Lynne

    [Reply]

  29. Betty Selden says:

    Hi, I have a 7 yr old shihtzu and I guess I started him with

    Come Here and he comes immediately when I am walking him and he gets

    in a large area where I can release him so he does his business

    But when I call COME he takes his time but when I say Bubba,

    come here. He comes immediately.

    Somehow the COME HERE seems to mean more to him than a come.

    Thought you may be interested.

    Always enjoy your Talk/

    [Reply]

  30. paula says:

    Cj is 5 and I have worked with her to get her to come to me when I call her but she is a runner and takes off.I had her chipped so I get her back when animal control picks her up but I get very frustrated with her.so I don’t work with her anymore

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    She needs to be on a leash and you NEED to work with her, that is the only way she will learn consistency! Just make it a game, keep her on a leash and have fun using treats and toys!

    [Reply]

  31. Liliya Y says:

    I like the article also. I have 4 month ald yourkeepoo and usually when I try to get him when he runs away, it is not easy to do. He thinks it is a chasing game and I can’t catch him, even several people can’t catch him, he is quick. And I was told by the trainer in a puppy school,to not chase a dog .But to avoid dangerous situations, how can i teach him to stop or stay?
    thanks!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Teach him in a safe area!! And, stop chasing, that is a dog’s favorite game!!!

    [Reply]

  32. gale grant says:

    well this is my first time on I will try and let you know how I did, I really enjoyed all the helpful hints, now if I can only follow threw. ( THANK YOU )

    [Reply]

  33. SUE says:

    So…my unruly dog goes into our fenced yard and barks, gets all muddy and chases squirrels. We have had a trainer 2X for barking and walking… Still problems. I have called him with negatives and also he goes into his crate for awhile when he comes in as he is muddy. So if he is barking or muddy how do I get him to come in and not have him associate it with a negative? He will usually come in if I go out in the yard and tell him to go in. Not always convenient if it is pooring or I’m dressed for work and worried about him getting me muddy. Suggestions? By the way, thanks for all your helpful hints!

    [Reply]

  34. Harv says:

    OK…I have a 6 mos. old female Schnauzer who just was spayed and I am ready to begin some serious (well, yes…FUN,FUN,FUN)training. Daisy Mae is very high-strung and even takes a vet ordered type Prozac. Hence getting and keeping her attention is a challenge to say the least.

    She took quickly to “shake” so I am under the assumption she is a pretty smart young lady and can learn other commands as well. My question concerns using the clicker for teaching the “come” command. Is it appropriate? At what point is the clicker activated? How do I know if she even hears it or relates it to the command?

    I like the idea and psychology behind clicker training, but there is a lot of details I admit I am confused about. Where is the detailed instruction for people like me at 69 years old?

    [Reply]

  35. Larry Bovee says:

    We have a 4 mo. old Lab & Husky mix. I got the training Pkg. From Chet. I have worked with Jessie and I have her doing good on most of it. AS LONG AS SHE’S IN THE HOUSE. When she goes outside, the clicker means nothing to her. If she feels like playing with a stick instead of coming to you? That’s what she does. In the house if I click, she can’t get there fast enough. Outside? Another story. We play ball almost everyday outside, she will bring it back and drop it for a treat. I just can’t get her to come to the house without a leash. If the leash is on her, she will come in reasonably well. If the leash is not on her, she will come in when she’s ready. If I go towards her she starts tearing around the yard making a game of it, I usually stand still till she gets done. Sooner or later she will come for the treat, I leash her up and take her inside…What do I do?? Thanks….

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Read this article and try doing some long line and working toward off leash behaviors!

    http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/leash-obedience-mysteries-solved/

    [Reply]

  36. joan waddington says:

    i have 2 collies 1 is 3 the other one is1 the 1year old comes when called but if i have the other dog how will be sat at my feet the young one just circles me she just want come to my feet have you any idears

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Make sure the older one is not keeping her at bay with some dirty looks or body posture. Sometimes younger dogs stay a bit behind because the other dog doesn’t want to share.

    Put the young one on a leash and help her come closer with praise, treats and affection so she learns where you want her when her sister is also there!

    [Reply]

    joan waddington Reply:

    dont think its that as young one the domenant one

    [Reply]

  37. Brook says:

    We dogsit our daughter’s cocker mix rescue dog. He has always come. Lately (he’s 10) he still comes most of the time, but if he doesn’t want to walk or go home in the car, he hides under the table and growls if you come near. No special treat (chicken, hot dog, cheese) works. A few minutes later he might wander out to visit, and then when asked will come — or run back under the table. He’s fairly active and seems to feel fine. It’s a big change in behavior, as our daughter took him to several training classes at age 5 when she rescued him and he has always minded well, especially on Come and Touch.

    Help!

    Thanks.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    First thing I would do is have a total physical done on him including bloodwork by your veterinarian! Any complete change in behavior can be linked to a health problem, it could be as easy as blood levels are off, an ear infection or as serious as a tumor, but only your vet can rule those things out.

    If that clears then it is time to figure out why the behavior has changed? Again I lead to thinking that pain associated with walking or getting jostled in the car might be to blame. Or did he once get in trouble for coming or have something completely traumatic happen when you called him to come?

    Then put a leash on him when he is in the house so you can remove him from under the table with no problem and make sure you can reward good behavior!

    [Reply]

  38. Emma Jean Wike ( sounds like mickey) says:

    We too am having problems with our dog not coming & not stopping barking when told. She is a little Pom, 6 years tomorrow & in good health. She comes sometimes in the house & she comes to me on her own if I’m crying about something. ( I lost my Mom not long ago.) Can you help us with these things? I would truly appreciate your help.
    With sincere thanks, Jean

    [Reply]

  39. Chris F says:

    My boston (Chloe 4 yrs old) had this down but I’ve noticed it’s getting sloppy and sometimes she just ignores me, so your saying, practice practice practice more and more fun and treats and she should snap out of it? . I’ve thought she did so good, I stopped shortly after training her, she loves going for walks on leashes so I should use it because she responds to it like a game and loves walking on leash since most of the time she is off leash in big yard open no fences, always comes back but noticed she’s getting slower and not listening to me, wonders off like I did not say a word, she won’t run but just mop around trees like I’m not there. so I’ll give it a brush up lesson and stay on top. thanks for great advise. I noticed if I crab freesbie she come bolting to me. that would be a great encouragement to retrain her. thanks

    chris

    [Reply]

  40. Carol L. Davison says:

    I manage employee performance and see dogs as furry humans. I don’t want my dog treat motivated any more than I want my employees to only perform when thanks, cash awards and promotions are distributed. For this reason, people and pup rewards are distributed intermitently.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Your employees get paid to come to work, yes?

    That is their reward.

    When you can get them to come to work without any reinforcement at all then let me know 😉

    As for the “come” command, it is best to be as reliable as possible, just like the pay check they come to work for.

    [Reply]

  41. Lisa Messmer says:

    I recently rescued three coonhounds from the shelter. The oldest is amybe 3-5 years old. The younger two are around a year old now. The older one had been kept in a kennel and is a fence climber/jumper. He can climb an 8 ft. chainlink fence and can jump my 4 ft. high fence from a standstill. He is a great dog otherwise.. but I can’t get him to stop the fence jumping so he is on a cable while the other two can run free in my fenced back yard. Sometimes the hook somehow fails and he is off to bark at the neighbor’s dogs or run the property. I used to get in the car and chase him but that became a game and I stopped. Now, he will come back but not until he is ready to. I can’t chase him at all. How can I get him to come to me when he gets loose like this? Even with food, he won’t come til he’s ready to.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    How much “teaching” time have you spent?

    Teach him what you want and what you mean.

    Then don’t let him escape. Look into invisible fence or something to keep him safe so he doesn’t get hit by a car!!!

    And, then you can use a long line to teach him to come at a bigger distance.

    [Reply]

    Lisa Messmer Reply:

    I’ve worked with him on come when he’s on the cable and he does listen. I’ve gone out with food in a stainless steel food dish and shook it while calling him but if he is wanting to run a bit, he just runs. He used to go farther but now stays pretty much on the landlady’s property. I live in the country so there’s not a lot of traffic. I can’t afford invisible fencing right now but am hoping to get that installed. When he does finally come, I do praise a LOT and give him a few treats. He IS getting a bit better as he doesn’t take as long to come back as he used to. I think this is a major reason he was probably brought to the shelter.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    It is important to understand he is a hound. His brain is his nose, not his actual brain. His instincts tell him to go to ground and sniff.

    In order for you to “win” you need to keep him on a leash or a long line. This gives you control.

    Having him run the property or even on a cable (unless you have a hand on the other end of it) gives you NO control.

    And calling him when you have no control and he is not likely to listen is teaching him to ignore you.

    You have to find his motivator and make him work for it and possibly his food!

    Work on obedience, come, down, sit, heel, stay, find heel position etc. and he will learn to listen to you by default (because he is working for you regularly).

    By not training several times per day, he is learning to make his own calls and do what makes him happy. His nose is his happy place right now, not coming to you.

    So change the dynamics of your relationship by doing lots of obedience and making it fun and teaching him to listen to you.

    Check out our hands off program or the videos in our puppy programming or video vault to get a handle on training and making it fun.

    My favorite is the puppy programming (not just for puppies) because it has over 60 videos and teaches you basic and advanced obedience and more things than you would learn in several regular classes.

    http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/puppyprogramming

  42. JimmyP says:

    Hi, I have a 5 year old Wheaten terrier that is extremely timid, she is afraid of everything and I mean everything: wind, sewer/storm grades garbage cans etc. She will not come on command and prefers to spend her time on her own sleeping under the bed. Don’t get me wrong, she does have her fun moments where she wants to play but it is on her schedule, when she wants to play she will let you know. The only time we see her is in the morning when she needs to go out and in the evening for her walk. We occasionally take her to a dog park (off leash) where she prefers to be by our side, she will sniff other dogs but won’t play with them. She will come when called off-leash in the dog park(?) She is very friendly to strangers and enjoys affection, she is does not have any aggressive tendencies and loves children. When she is on leash for walks she obeys to sit, stay, come and heel. Once in the home she is mostly out of sight, and when we go to get her she scurries away as if we are going to hurt her. We have never raised a hand to her and shown her complete affection at all times. Frustration is beginning to kick in recently as now she won’t come for her evening walks..no matter what, we literally need to get her from under the bed, put a leash on her and take her out(?) Where have we gone wrong and how do we repair these issues???? Hellllpppp!!!!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Obviously she is having anxiety about something and has conditioned herself that being under the bed is safest.

    I would close the bedroom door and any other doors you need to for a while to encourage her to come and be part of the family.

    Dont make a big deal about it just close them and when she chooses to come to you have treats ready and praise her.

    You can also use baby gates to keep her in the room you are in or a tie down in the room you are in and then provide her with toys and treats etc.

    [Reply]

  43. Sheila says:

    I would also like to suggest that along with come . . . stay is very important. Years ago our family included a Siberian/Wolf mix that saved my son’s life when he was being attacked by a bear, just a little history. She wasn’t what you would call very obedient when asked to come. Oh she knew what it meant, but only listened when she wanted too. But I also taught her stay, and more then once when she would go walk about, and decide to some when I called her, I was able to get her to stop when she was about to cross the street and a car was coming. Not sure if anyone else brought this up as I couldn’t read all of the posts.

    Thank you for sharing these items. Great comments, and I wish I could have read them all!

    [Reply]

  44. Suzie says:

    You all have good advise on call back.I have learned a lot. I will try to enforce the stay command. There are not many places to leave the Sujo off leash. I need help with Sujo going crazy when he hears the doorbell ring. Can someone give advice on what to do, and how to keep him calm.Thanks in advance Suzie

    [Reply]

  45. Jan says:

    Thanks for the great article. My excellent 8 mo old, who previously came always, has been a problem when we are in the woods off leash. Wanted to nip this in the bud so we can continue to enjoy our walks.

    [Reply]

  46. Cathy says:

    Hi there,
    My dogs always want to come inside when I try to come in from feeding them, they are not allowed inside and its always a mission to get back in and get them out! Any suggestions?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Of course they do, dogs are pack animals and they want to be with you, no amount of training or work is going to change that.

    You can actually spend time with them and train them to sit and stay as you make your way inside, however, spending time with them and perhaps letting them inside so they can become part of your pack and learn to listen is probably the kinder solution.

    [Reply]

  47. Tami says:

    Hi,

    We just rescued a Stafordshire Terrier that the rescue group misrepresented his training and behavior. Let me start by saying that we don’t believe that a dog should ever be off leash unless in a secure area. Our secure area is a 100′ x 120′ dog run with 5.5 to 6′ fence depending on the slope of the land – he cleared it. The dog is a sweetheart in the house – comes when you call him, house trained, good with the cats/kids/and other dogs. He is even really good on the leash until he wants to go after something. Then he is a runner but he doesn’t run away (like down the street), he wants us to play chase or he goes after neighbors livestock. Each of the times that we have had to play “chase” it has taken us hours to re-catch him. He doesn’t have any of the usual motivations – ie treats, attention, toys, or getting in the car. I am at a loss of how to train a dog that has no motivators of any kind. Please I need help.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    First off you need to be training daily, just regular obedience stuff or there is no reason that he would listen.

    Second every dog has a motivator, you just need to find it! Read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/finding-dogs-motivator/

    But the most important thing is constant training!

    [Reply]

  48. liv says:

    hi i vist my mom at an apartment and my dog bear never goes out with a leash to do his potty but when he hears someone in the parking lot he runs after them or if 3he is out side and the neighbors walk by he gos chaseing there heels down can you help me on what to do thanks…:)

    thank you and have a nice day……liv

    [Reply]

  49. Jack says:

    Hi i have a 6 month old cocker spaniel reading about the come command has made me realise i need to work on it more because if he is off lead he completly ignores me even if i show him i have a treat for him and i would like to ask for advice on stopping him from pulling on the lead i am trying stop start at the moment stopping when lead goes tight and walking when loose and rewarding i would just like to know am i going to get anywhere if i do this and the other people who walk him dont do it? Thank you

    [Reply]

  50. I had an incident with my two Norfolk terriers. I live in a remote area and rarely see anyone when I am out walking. I am used to them running off for rabbits because they usually sit and wait for me when they realise I am not in view. I use the treat method but have become silly in that I usually give them a treat when they come to me after shouting here several times. However when they spotted a lady walking with her collie which I knew to be aggressive they ignored me totally and headed for her and the dog. She did not slow down and went into an adjoining field which had cows in it. I heard her laughing and I was so angry that she opted to allow my dogs to follow her. Then the worst situation happened which I was dreading in that her collie then attacked my smaller Norfolk. She hit both dogs with her stick and I heard my dog yelp and as I finally approached her dog had mine pined. At this point thankfully my other dog had retreated. Finally the other dog did come back to me. I was angry with myself more than anything because it was my failure to instill the correct method for recal and tray with my dogs. I shouted at them to go home which they both did instantly and I made my displeasure known to both of them. So do I go back to basics now and start the training all over in the house and garden or do I put them back on the leash for a few days and then do the treat method out in the field. They both hate being on the lead but I feel sick thinking that my dog could have been seriously hurt but that dog and I was to blame. Help?

    [Reply]

  51. jay says:

    hi,my dog has some recall training.but off the lead lately he runs to greet people and if i go to him he runs away,when he is running to greet strangers if i cal he look at me and keeps going…3 times he ran across a quiet street so for me this need emergency help please….

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Read the article and follow the instructions.

    [Reply]

  52. Britt says:

    I have a 1 1/2 yr. old Min. Schauzer. She’s a good dog. She loves to go for walks, BUT, as soon as the leash comes out she runs the other direction. I try to coach her to come with a treat, th no avail . It is so annoying.
    HELP!!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/puppy-wont-walk-leash/

    [Reply]

  53. colette says:

    we have just adopted a 2 year old springer spaniel he is good on command however the mere sight of a ball is enough to set him into a frenzy he took off over the fields with the football wouldn’t come back and had to be followed and caught with difficulty. its like my ball and me when he sees it. I can only think this was his sole source of stimulation before we got him how can I break this obsession.
    thanking you
    colette

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Don’t break his obsession, use it to your benefit read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/teaching-dog-retrieve-play-drive/ and only take it out for play and training time

    [Reply]

  54. Donna says:

    I love reading your articles, as they are very informative.
    We have a 5yr old Havanese, Bentley. We adopted him from a pet store that was trying to find a new home for him for the previous owner. Bentley has definately attached to me. At first he was afraid of my husband, but as of lately ( we have had him 6 mos now) my husband is his playmate, as they play all the time with different toys.The problem is the come command. He will come to me, but if I am not around, and my husband tries to call him, he totally ignores him. Then when my husband goes to try to get him, he slows down, but takes quite a while to get him and he drops his head and tail. We have never yelled at him, or been mean to him at all. We were told that the previous owners had a grandson, or male child, that was rather mean to him. Is there any way to reverse these behaviors with my husband. My hubby loves Bentley, but is having a hard time with him coming to him or even walking on a leash with him. Thank you

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Make it more rewarding, add scrumptious treats and games as mentioned in the article.

    [Reply]

  55. Howard Albrecht says:

    I’ve been using treats to get my dog Henry to do
    things. So far he’s pretty much potty trained.
    Leaves things upon request or until I give him the OK signal. He even d comes to me — sometimes.
    Problem is I’ve been so dependent on treats, when it comes
    time to eat he doesn’t want any. Turns his nose up at it. I”ve tried several brands to no avail. I’ve tried to entice him
    with chicken and the like, but all he does in eat the chicken.
    What should I do? Stop the treats or now worry about the food and when he gets hungry he’ll come around.

    Thanks for you help.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    read this
    http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/misusing-treats-dog-training/

    [Reply]

  56. Kathy says:

    Love your training tips. Have used several and have a very well behaved Border Collie cross Australian Cattle Dog (Male desexed). He is a rescue dog (I have had him since January this year) and he has learnt to shake hands, play dead, shake hands, high five, retrieve etc,not go out the door before me,come when called and to sit at the gate and not go out without my okay. HOWEVER my neighbour across the road has 5 dogs who I have met, 4 little dogs and one the same size as my dog. None of whom are desexed. My problem is that my neigbour’s dogs are always running on the road and when I take my dog to the gate they growl, bark and come charging towards us and onto my property. My dog just reacts and he goes running towards them. I call come three to four times before he actually comes ? Heckles raised etc. The training to not go out the gate seems to fly out the window. I live on a 5 acre farm and my neighbour is across the road. Cars scoot down at fairly high speeds. I have talked to my niegbour and it hasn’t made a difference. I also have a small elderly deaf dog. It has got so bad that I can’t take my dog around my property without my neigbours dogs going balistic and running onto my property. Any ideas?
    Thanks

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Keep your dogs on leash and speak to your neighbor. If they are unwilling to comply, call animal control.

    [Reply]

  57. Lafran says:

    Hi your newsletters and tips are awesome and effective! I have a yorkiepoo:Noel good dog besides I tried everything to potty train her yet she releases any&everywhere all over my house! I had no problems with her coming until: my room=her room=her “territory”=never “release”. One day I was gone too long so she released in my room,made it a habit!=my room smelling bad. I steam cleaned, changed her ‘room’,& make her sleep in her cage,& now when I leave she has to be in her room(no exceptions cuz of smell). She now does not “come” to me, she runs&hides every time I call or come near her,she don’t like me, cuz she thinks I’m “punishing” her by putting her in cage at night&when I leave. It’s really bothering me that she don’t “come”anymore & runs hide &fear me. I feel like we don’t have that bond anymore it’s sad n annoying. It’s even more difficult to potty train her cuz she won’t come to me I can’t catch her to teach her to potty outside so she releases even more in house. House Smells even worse. I’m beginning to give up. Pointless chasing her.Landlord mad(cuz smell if it doesn’t get solved I’m forced to give her up,kids will be sad. Please help me! Tried treats!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    search all of my potty training articles, and read them and change your lifestyle. You an search articles at the top on the search button.

    But you will have to be willing to keep your dog on a leash and follow him around in order to make a change and it will take longer but…. remember habits are hard to break

    [Reply]

  58. Erik says:

    Hi! I have a 1.3 year old English GoldenDoodle. I have her pretty well trained in the house. Down, stay, come, down, stay in mid stride, and then down again, ect. We just got a fence, and the minute I have her outside she won’t do anything! I try treats to get her to come and she just ignores me. I try to go get her and she plays the come and get me..I don’t want to chase her because it encourages her run. I am upset because she is so good inside but nothing out.help

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Then use a leash outside until she listens and play the game mentioned in this article

    [Reply]

  59. Rick says:

    1.5 year old Italian greyhound we rescued 3 months ago. We were told he was abused and confiscated in his previous life. He does not respond reliably to treats, often ignoring treats completely. Off leash, he is 100% in game mode, and his favorite game is keep away from Dad. He will not come when called and it can take hours to get him back in the house if we don’t attach a long lead to him because he is so quick. That’s true even if I tire him out before trying to get him to come.

    [Reply]

  60. Bruce Greenwood says:

    I have a 5.5 mo old boxer puppy – Brook. We are in the 3rd week of Companion Dog Training. I am struggling with teaching Brook the ‘down’ command. Do you have any helpful tips that you can pass along?
    Thanks,
    Bruce

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Absolutely, read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/difference-plouts-platz/

    [Reply]

  61. Sarah says:

    I have a 10 month old yellow lab. Her name is Lily and she was the runt of her litter. I have taught her how to sit, lay down and stay, she is very good at it and I reward her with treats when she listens and does what she is told. But her biggest problem is coming to me when she is called. I have taken her outside and let her off her leash to play fetch, she runs after the ball but she won’t bring it back or even attempt to pick it up she just keeps running. So I will try and call her and shake a bag of treats, she just doesn’t come and when I go to get her she thinks it is a game and just keeps running away. It worries me when she doesn’t come because she seems very interested in cars and I don’t want her to get hit. If you have any advice I would rlly appreciate it if you could help Lily and I out.
    Thanks,
    Sarah

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    A dog that doesn’t come when called should not be off leash

    [Reply]

  62. AJ says:

    Any advice for making my 2 year old finnish hound stop hopping the fence to chase rabbits? He is a very active dog. We walk him daily and provide him with plenty of toys. However, it feels like he might be bored or the environment just seems more interesting than our big back yard. Once, he gets out it is hard to get him back until he becomes tired. Inside the backyard and house he responds to the “come” command, however outside those areas it just becomes a game of catch me if you can while he explores everything. Sometimes, the car trick works other times he just looks at you to make sure you are there following and darts in another direction.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I would recommend invisible fencing just inside your regular fencing to keep the dog from being able to jump over

    [Reply]

  63. Heike Gleibs says:

    Hello minette,
    thx a lot for your advice. I love it because it’s always in favour of the animal.
    I do train my beloved dalmatian a lot and regularly. We have made progress.
    But when I train sitz, platz, steh (also from a distance) this takes him about three seconds to respond. He is never that fast as your doggies.
    I also doubt whether the commands are reliable.
    How can I improve this?
    Thanx a lot for your awesome job!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I make everything a game. Want a faster sit, show the dog you have treats and don’t reward if it is not fast enough. Motivate the dog get him excited and then ask for a sit, if it is faster even a little or happier then reward. Teach the dog that fast and happy will be rewarded with this you will get more reliability

    [Reply]

  64. Don says:

    Hello Minette, I have a 4 year old cross beagle.he was a rescue dog with no history and we have had him for 2years with no problems except that he is unsure of strangers. He is walked 2-3 times s day and seems content. My problem is that recently in the evenings he will not socialise with us and sits in the garden for a long while refusing to come in. I have tried being playful and encouraging him with treats but he completely ignores me. I have to go out and put him on the lead and gently bring him in as any type of force makes him worse and at times I have felt that he might turn on me. Your help and advice would be appreciated.x

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    This is not a normal change. I would take him to your vet ASAP… not normal for a dog to change so drastically at 4

    [Reply]

  65. Samantha says:

    I have an italian greyhound. He is 10 years old and been with me since his first day on earth. He knows his name. Very well actually. He could be 3 blocks down chasing something and i say his name and he is right back at my side. If im in the kitchen he knows the rules he doesnt beg but if i call him he will come and sit for further instruction. But sometimes if im on the couch or in bed and he is laying somewhere else im the room, i could scream his name, whistle, clap, he wont even look up. He never used to ignore me like that. How do i teach him to not ignore me or only come when he feels like it? Or is he just too old. I had a maltese just pass on at 19 years old, i inherited him as im only 15. Up until he lost his hearing he would never ignore me. Can this be corrected?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I would go to your vet and have his hearing checked.

    [Reply]

  66. MaryAnn says:

    I have a 1 1/2 year old Chihuahua, when I walk him if another dog is walking by he goes crazy. How can I control his behavior to be relaxed or just ignore to be more calm when a dog approachs or just walks by. Also collar versus harness?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    How often do you do obedience with him? make him sit, or lie down on command?

    Obedience is the key to overcoming all bad behaviors. Then I give mine an incompatible behavior like giving me eye contact or doing a down stay facing away from the dog.

    But these won’t work if you aren’t doing regular obedience at home.

    [Reply]

  67. Katie says:

    Hi, I have a border collie mixed with a perineeze. Hank hates leashes every since we got him won’t wear one. Usually he stays in the yard to go potty than after he is done I give him treats and he comes inside. Lately he will not come in leaves the yard I call his name nothing. After he goes potty I crotch down and say good boy and he comes running and u give him a treat. Most of the time now he Wil wonder other places of the yard or go to a neighbor’s yard and will bot come in. I made the mistake of every time I call him and he doent reply and I catch him I put him in the crate for 5 mins. Help!! Ik I need to teach him and plays games.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Leashes are critical to life he “won’t” wear one because you give him that option http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/puppy-wont-walk-leash/

    [Reply]

  68. Courtney says:

    Hello.
    Today my dog escaped and we did everything on this list, and she still wouldnt come. She is a Whippet x Shepherd x Boxer mix, and she ran the furthest away she has ever gone. No matter how much we called come, and walked the other way she would not come. (She was severely abused by a man and he cracked her skull…) Anyway. One of our neighbors came out with treats and she came right up to her but no matter how much I train her to come, she will do it in the house but as soon as we go outside and there are squirrels she doesnt care she just keeps running and today it almost cost her her life. I am a dog trainer myself and have been training dogs since I was fourteen but I do not know how to mend this problem. I dont want her to run again, and I am scared she might. When I put her in a confined yard with fencing she wont come, or she will come and then run away. Same goes for the dog park. Same goes for if I put her on a long lead and call her. She just ignores me. I dont know if its because the boxer in her is incredibly stubborn or what but I am seriously struggling and worried about this happening again.
    I dont know how to mend this problem.
    Could you please help me?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    There is no miracle fix without constant and consistent training. Read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/command-difficult-dog/

    [Reply]

  69. Michelle Bosher says:

    Hello
    I have just adopted a lovely 5yr old Springer Spaniel who at the moment is on a diet due to last owners who fed him all human food he never went for walks, my problem is he don’t respond to his name at all I have managed to get him to walk better at heal (he used to just pull ) but we are frightened to let him off the leash at the beach or any of the lovely big fields as he just dont listern any advice but be great thank you

    [Reply]

  70. christine says:

    We have just got a 2 year old husky cross akita we Is well behaved at home but when we take him out he can be off a lead as he runs away and does not come to any comand .. any help please

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    To know why, read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/rewarding-lesson-letting-dog-run-free/

    [Reply]

  71. ali says:

    I have huskies, and sometimes i think the instinct to run can’t be trained out of them. One of mine knows the word ‘treat’ very well. i can just say it in the house, or in the back yard and he comes running all excited. …unless he’s free, i can say it, he’ll look at me and the treat, think about it for a split second, and then RUN. 🙂

    no treat is worth his freedom in his opinion.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Read this… this is why http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/rewarding-lesson-letting-dog-run-free/

    [Reply]

  72. nate says:

    hi i have a 7 month old lab cross retriever puppy and shes a good pup but she some times grabs socks and runs off with them an wont bring the back and she runs around like is a big game and i try calling her to get her to come back and she just stand s there but when i get close she runs around again and it some times take me and my mum or bothers t get it of her what em i doing wrong

    also some times she will run out the front and not come back in side unless i put her in the car and take he and put her out the back so what em i doing wrong

    thanks heaps hope for a reply soon
    from nate

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Read the article, play the game.

    Read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/teaching-thief-retrieve/

    [Reply]

  73. Rebecca says:

    Hi. I have a King Charles Cavalier. 10 months old. I have taught him all his commands, sit, stay wait, no etc and he knows his boundaries. In the garden he will obey my command “Pyper Front” taught me by a trainer to get him to come to my legs when off the lead. He is immediately rewarded with a tasty treat. However when out in fields it’s almost like he goes deaf and he completely ignores me so ends up back on the lead. Help please I love to see him off the lead but worried he will bolt.

    [Reply]

  74. Mickie says:

    I have a 7 month old American pit bull terrier. He is great on a leash and has great recall
    However… he has been “planting” lately with absolute refusal to move. We have been trying to get him excited, trying to get him his favorite treats and toys, and the second he has one, he stops again. Is there a way to stop him from turning into dead weight?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    you have to be more exciting.

    I wonder if perhaps he has had something negative happen when he did come? He was yelled at, something good was taken away?

    But either way you have to be the most exciting thing in his life! More exciting than squirrels, other dogs etc.

    [Reply]

  75. erica says:

    I have an almost 2yr old Havanese “Monte”, who is the love of my life. He does not listen to me very well so i am taking your advice that i have read in this article but i have 1 more question for you.Every time someone walks by, either with their dog on a leas or on their own my dog jumps up on the couch and he will receptively bark uncontrollably until they walk by the house and are out of site. Is there anything i can do…. Please help

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/teaching-dog-quiet/

    [Reply]

  76. RebeCCA says:

    Just read your article on the “come” command and I’m hoping you can give me some advice!
    I have a 5 month old pyrenees x caucasian ovcharka and I have read a lot on both breeds and they seem to not be obedient type dogs… they are used for guarding and tend to ignore a lot of commands. He has so far come a long way and when I have him on a leash he will listen EXTREMELY well. And when off leash he is loose on 14 acres and I can call him and he will come running full tilt to sit and get his cookie! However, when I’m outside and he is doing something bad – for example he will get in the horse paddock and I will call him and he just runs the other way… he will not come he thinks it’s a game. He must know I’m going to take him out of the paddock but I have no other choice I don’t want him to get kicked. Same thing happens if he takes something he shouldn’t like a shoe. I try to trade him with something better bt he just run away..I can’t even get close enough to show him that what I have is better. I’m worried that he will just be like that- sometimes will listen and sometimes won’t.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Life and training is a GAME. As you say you are mad, he is where he shouldn’t be.

    Instead make it a game of if you come you get something WONDERFUL like boiled chicken (or the like) and he won’t be able to resist coming to you.

    Then it is your job to make sure you don’t punish him, no matter what!

    [Reply]

  77. Jennifer Jones says:

    I just got a 9 week old poodle. She acts scared of everyone. She does not want to be petted and will run if you try to pick her up. She hides under the bed and will sneak to the kitchen to eat.

    She will follow us outside to go potty and come back in when she is done. Then she runs to hide under the bed.

    I sit in the floor and throw treats at her and try to get her to come closer and closer. I have made her sit with me in on the couch twice to pet her and she licked my hand one time. But when I set her on the ground she runs and hides under the bed.

    I don’t want to scare her and not sure how to get her comfortable with approaching me and not running if I need to pick her up.

    [Reply]

  78. Carop says:

    We have a four moth female pug. When I try to get her to come or even I approach her she run away. She is a love but she is going to get hurt. My husband said we have to put her on a leash so she know she has to stay with her. She loves to run in the yard so far she stayed in yard. But I afraid if she doesn’t come when called she is going to get hurt. She I take her to obedience school for training?

    [Reply]

  79. jen says:

    its sound lots like a man

    [Reply]

  80. Cassio Silveira says:

    Hi guys, my name is Cassio, I would like to teach my german shepard to come out and sit outside my garage door and stand guard until I pull inside my garage and close it every time me or my family members comes home. I live in Brazil and it is common for tugs to wait in the bushes until you come out of your car and rob you(or worse) inside your garage. I have seen it done by a rich guy in Rio, every time he came home as soon he opened the garage door his 2 Dobermans would come out, sit outside in a very composed guard position staring forward motionless and wait there until the garage door started closing, it was quite nice to watch it. Could you guys give some tips on how to teach that to my dog? he is 1 year old. Thanks

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    why not have the dog come out and get in the car with you? Then escort you inside? Either way what you are talking about is a dog that has protection training and that is a whole other type of training you would have to look into in your area. Just a dog is not going to do anything.

    [Reply]

  81. Adam says:

    My blue Amerrican staffy oscar is nearly 3 lives what id call a privilaged lifestyle simmilar to that of a spoilt child he is fantastic as a companion he is perfect in porportion and apperance big strong well socialised he has still got his wheels the one thing that bothers me is all he does is sniffs when he is outside and he sniffs seriously when he finds a good scent he will sniff the spot for 35min drooling he has no interest in cats dogs children adults toys or treats he devotes his absolute undivided attention to the sniff if i put him on his lead he will stay staunch and fully resist with everything he has to remaining on the sniff my girlfriend and sister can not move him he can sniff for hrs iv had to drive out to litteraly pick him up to get him off the spot it pisses me off bad so i ocassionaly spray deodorant to stuff him up i know its bad but it sorts him right out he carries on sneezing any more suitable solutions to his serioul sniffing ?

    [Reply]

  82. My wife and I rescued a “7” month old puppy. We live in the country and she chases everything ! She will not come when we call and seems to only be encouraged to roam farther when we chase after her. How do we correct this behavior and get her to come ?

    [Reply]

  83. poorvi says:

    can i ask you one thing? Actually, i’m just about to take a golden retriever and to tell you i’m not an adult. i am still of 13. can you kindly help me in the task by telling what kind of training tips would work with this breed.

    [Reply]

  84. David says:

    Hi. I have 1 yr old American Stafford bull terrier/blue pit boy who is unfixed. He is very people friendly. And super love bug with me. Lately as he has gotten older 9 mo+ he only will be shy in public almost timid. He will back seat behind me if strangers want to say hi to him and and approach. Is this an ok behavior? Is it just loyalty and preference of whose affection he is getting because he will only really want my attention and no one else’s. Also lately over the past 2 months when we go to the dog park he has been I think too excited so he ends up semi attacking a dog. No bites or blood ever just intense rush with barking and it is persistent until someone breaks it up. We go to multiple dog parks. And we go 4 to 5 Times a week for 2 to 3 hrs straight. When there is less dogs he doesnt seem to get amped or hyped to where it happens. He grew up with two other dogs (husky and lab/pit) how do I stop the attacking? And the social braveness or confidence.
    If I get him fixed with the fights stop? But will he lose his muscle tone?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    It is not an okay behavior to shy away, but you also shouldn’t force interaction. He is telling you he is uncomfortable, and you need to respect that yet build his confidence through obedience, like putting him on a down stay.

    He is also trying to communicate to you how he feels at the dog park. He is uncomfortable and he is acting out in aggression. If he does this to the wrong dog, you are likely to have a severe dog fight or a dead dog. Even if the other dog doesn’t kill him a severe dog fight can end with your dog being deemed dangerous and that is not great for the breed.

    Aggressive dogs don’t belong at the dog park, period. You can find other and more effective ways to exercise him and provide him with mental stimulation.

    I would also have him neutered ASAP his hormones aren’t helping with either of these problems. I’ve never heard anything about neutering and muscle tone. If you exercise him, he will have good muscle

    [Reply]

  85. Jessica says:

    Hi I have a dog names Athena. She is a German shepherd. She trains quickly and listens well even with the come command. But when my neighbor walks to get in her car and she is outside she goes crazy. We have a fenced in back yard but she just runs up and down and ignores are commands like “hush”. How do I make her listen to me when my neighbor is outside and make her come to me.

    [Reply]

  86. Matt says:

    Our 9mo. old Half Akita and Half Mastiff knows all the commands and will follow them perfectly if in the house but once outside if let off the lead makes a beeline to the neighbors chickens. I’m in immediate emergency mode as he has now twice gotten a chicken. Can you train out the natural Akita instinct for high prey drive?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    There is really nothing more rewarding than killing something and the adrenaline rush for the dog. I would keep the dog on leash and not allow this behavior. Many country neighbors kill dogs who hurt or steal livestock.

    [Reply]

  87. AV says:

    I have a weird problem with my dog. When I play fetch with him, he will fetch the ball half way through and then drop it. He knows I am calling him but he ll ignore and wander around and not pay attention to me. He does fine when I show him a treat but not otherwise. He does fine in the house with the come command and most of the times outside. But some outside, he will look into my eyes when I say come and then ignore. he does that to me but not my husband.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    He probably either respects your husband more, your husband has more criteria or your husband doesn’t use treats to bribe him. All of these things are important. If you aren’t doing obedience constantly dogs don’t really respect us. If you allow this behavior, this behavior will continue. And, bribery is always kind of an ugly thing. The dog should learn to bring the toy back to spend time with you and be engaged and have fun. If my dog did this I would take his leash and immediately take him back in the house. If you don’t want to play you don’t get to play by yourself.

    [Reply]

  88. Richard Stokes says:

    Hello, I have a 2 year old Rottweiler cross, he has always been brilliant off the lead and came to our calls, but since we have introduced our puppy into the home he ignores us and runs off, this doesn’t help with the puppy either as he just follows, we have tried treats and toys but it seems he is too stubborn now the new dog has arrived. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Go back to training and working with both of them. Also, I would stop letting them run free

    [Reply]

  89. Jennifer says:

    I have a 5 month old male Rottweiler- SOO much fun!!! One of our biggest and I would say saddest things with Tyson is he is a bit aggressive and has been since we got him at 8 weeks (first sign of aggression was 10 weeks) It’s heartbreaking and I have been noticing his “outbursts” a little bit more often lately. PLEASE HELP!!! I
    Know my little man is going to turn in to a very big man soon, and I don’t want him to be unhappy and I can’t allow my children to be bit by him (sidenote: he has not EVER showed any aggression towards my girls). Thank you sooo much for your time!!!! ~Jenn, Will & Tyson~

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Find a veterinary behaviorist immediately!

    [Reply]

  90. Chris says:

    Hi,

    I have an 11 week old rescue German Shepard mix and she has been great and fun/happy thus far, although she is a bit timid but usually warms up to people and dogs after meeting them a second time.

    She is great at sitting and staying as well as coming when called when in our apartment and on a leash outside, however, she doesn’t like the walk to the elevator (shes still scared of it but has started walking in on her own). I can’t get her to come to me in the hallway and she wants to go back inside, although if I carry her, and then set her down in the elevator, she runs down the hallway and then is excited to go out once it opens on the bottom floor. (she also doesn’t necessarily come to the door when I grab the leash or say we are going outside, but we are still in potty training, so maybe that’s normal?). I am stuck carrying her from my door to the elevator every time we go out, which is every hour, otherwise she won’t go outside and then will end up having an accident inside.

    Any idea would help!

    Thanks!

    [Reply]

  91. James Adams says:

    My wife and I are cotraining our two small adult dogs. There is often conflict with our approach. We need help with:
    Coming on demand.
    Barking obnoxiously.
    Eating/feeding schedule.
    My wife’s spoiling them.
    Ins/outs of being emotional. support dogs for my wife.
    Getting them to not dleep in our bed.
    To stop begging for our food.
    To releive themselves on demand.
    To go where we want.
    Separation anxiety for dogs & my wife.

    My wife is weak. I need help to help her….and ultimately myself.

    Please Help,
    James Adams

    [Reply]

  92. Debbie flaherty says:

    L have ten month jug cross puppy let her off lead she ran off called her she came running back to me u a
    Have to be calm and firm l play games with her

    [Reply]

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