How to Stop a Dog from Marking

When figuring out how to stop a dog from marking, it’s important that you first learn why dogs mark their territory.

Imagine this: you’re at home, and Mr. Barkley, your golden retriever, is in his usual spot on his bed. After a while, you decide to take him for a walk; after all, you don’t want him to turn into a chubby puppy! As you’re walking, you notice your neighbor, Linda, is gardening in her front yard. 

You greet her as you’re passing and she looks up – only it’s at the worst possible moment. Her eyes widen in horror. Just as she was looking up, guess what happened? Mr. Barkley lifted his leg and just marked her mailbox and freshly-pruned rose bushes!

 

Does This Look Familiar?

I get a lot of questions about dog potty training and quite a few come from the owners of intact, older male dogs, thinking that this is a potty training issue.  But. urine marking is not a “potty training” problem!

A dog that cocks his leg on the furniture is much different than a dog that squats and pees in a puddle on the floor.  Often, one of my first questions as a trainer is: was the urine on a vertical or horizontal structure?  Marking often occurs on furniture, doorways, clothing and anything else that might be new or that your dog deems is his.

 

Dogs Marking Inside

If marking their territory indoors is new behavior for your dog, then it is likely that something has changed in their environment.stop dog from marking

The introduction of a new pet into the house can cause a dog to behave territorially, especially if one or both are not spayed/neutered. This new pet’s presence causes a shift in the social dynamic of the household that your current dog may feel needs addressing.

Similarly, the regular presence of a new person can cause a dog to mark their territory. One example of this is when a pet owner’s new partner becomes a regular fixture in the household. Your dog urinating in the house when they are there does not mean that they do not like them, but that they feel threatened or they feel the need to show the new person that they are in his territory. They are attempting to show that they are the alpha over that territory. It belongs to them.

You could try combating this by asking the new person to bring treats with them and to make sure that they have positive social interactions with the dog.

Additionally, the arrival of a new baby can have the same effect. Your dog urinating on a diaper bag is not a sign of their disapproval of the baby, so much as a reaction to new smells and noises and the potential lack of attention they are now receiving.

Essentially, any person or animal who regularly brings new smells into the home and disturbs the social hierarchy could cause your dog to mark their territory.

 

WHY Do Dogs Urine Mark?

male dog sniffing car tireDogs are territorial animals.

That is a fact, and when they want to say “this is my spot,” they tell other people and animals by marking it using an assortment of ways.

One of the most common examples is when your dog barks to warn potential interlopers that they are about to trespass on his grounds. Some dogs will take this territory marking to the next level by urinating (or defecating, which is uncommon) in a certain spot.

Dogs use urine marking to show their dominance and to mark what they think belongs to them.

For dogs, urine is not gross or undesirable, in fact it is interesting and exciting and a way of signing their name to something.  It is also a way to sense what other dogs have been in the neighborhood and a way to show confidence and to advertise mating availability!

 

Common Causes of Urine Marking:

  1. Social Triggers 

Exciting social situations can trigger urine marking. Some male dogs only urine mark when in the presence of female dogs (especially if they’re in heat), and some urine mark only when interacting with other male dogs. Some dogs only urine mark when visiting homes where other dogs have urine marked before. Other dogs only urine mark when they become highly aroused and overstimulated in social situations. These dogs often mark nearby objects, people or other dogs.

  1. Anxiety dog behavior

Some dogs urine mark when they experience anxiety. Anxious dogs might deposit greater amounts of urine than dogs marking for other reasons. They might also urine mark on spots that aren’t vertical surfaces. A number of events can cause anxiety and trigger urine marking, including the presence of new objects, furniture or luggage in a dog’s environment, the departure of a resident from a dog’s home, a new person moving into the home, and conflict between a dog and people or other animals in the home.

  1. Something New in the Environment 

Some dogs urine mark when they encounter nonresident dogs in their environments or smell urine left in their environments by other dogs. A dog’s environment may encompass his home, his yard, the route he usually takes when on walks, friends’ homes he regularly visits, and parks or other locations he frequents.

  1. Your Dog is in Heat 

Dogs who are reproductively intact (non spayed females and non neutered males) are more likely to urine mark than spayed or neutered dogs. In unspayed females, urine marking usually happens more frequently just before and while they’re in heat.

An insecure dog may begin marking.  Dogs that enter a new home, have the addition of a baby or another pet may also feel the need to mark.

This is an instinct in the beginning when the behavior starts, that can become a conditioned behavior.  It is important to stop this behavior early before it becomes a habit or a conditioned behavior. So below I’ll give you some ideas on how to stop a male dog from marking everything he thinks belongs to him.

What Does Urine Marking Do?

In most cases, dogs mark their territory with a small amount of urine. They tend to lift their back leg and urinate on an object or area, thus claiming it as their own. This is called urine-marking.

Regardless, how does peeing somewhere get the message across that this is their territory?

Actually, a dog’s urine contains heaps upon heaps of information within its scent about that specific dog, something that is lost on us humans. Simply through the scent of the urine, another dog can know the sex, maturity and social status of the one who left the scent. You could say that urine acts like a canine business card.

Females in heat are prone to urinating in a similar way, but here the hormones and pheromones in their urine signal interested males from afar.

A dominant, alpha dog will be more inclined to mark their territory in a greater number of places, leaving a figurative – and sometimes literal – scent trail of destruction in his wake, while a more submissive one may lift their leg in only two or three places while they’re out. However, just because there is less marking doesn’t mean that there’s no problem.

It should be noted that not all male dogs will cock their leg when marking their territory, although this is the most common way. Additionally, despite common misconceptions, some females raise their leg to mark their territory too.

Also, in some extreme cases, dogs may even release large amounts of urine or even defecate to show something or somewhere is theirs.

Do All Male Dogs Mark?

Not all dogs mark, however spaying and neutering at an early age is best!

Most dogs that do mark begin marking when they reach sexual maturity (depending on the size of your dog) between 6 months to a year old.

Small breeds tend to mark more than larger breeds and intact males tend to mark more than neutered males or females.  Although many intact females may begin marking prior to going into heat to let the other dogs in the neighborhood know she is available.

What to Do When Your Dog Starts Marking:

Keep it from happening!

Most dogs that are spayed or neutered will not begin marking (and yes females can mark too, although it is rarer than when the males do it.)neuter your dog

Testosterone definitely plays a key role in urine marking, so neutering at ANY age can help even if the behavior has been conditioned.

Prevention is a much better cure than dealing with a behavior problem! 

I recommend spaying and neutering at about 16 weeks old or when your vet has finished up your puppy’s shots.

Unneutered dogs are more likely to mark their territory by spraying urine all throughout your house or other people’s belongings. Your dog might be less likely to mount other dogs, people and inanimate objects after he’s neutered. An additional benefit is that aggression problems may be avoided or mitigated if you neuter your dog early in life.

Neutering is a great option in general, however, if you’re planning on breeding your dog, then neutering is likely not a realistic possibility.

Supervise As Much As You Can!

You must catch your dog IN THE ACT of marking to let him know that what he is doing is wrong!  Again, this is instinctual for him to mark what he considers “his things”.  So you must be able to catch him and tell him NO.

Keep him on a leash or a tie down with you for many days.  If you cannot watch him, keep him in his crate. Treat him like an 8 week old puppy and keep him confined to small spaces that you are in, until you are certain he is not going to mark.

Do not tell your dog that he’s bad long after the fact. If you come home and find a puddle of urine from several hours before, then proceed to start disciplining your dog, your dog will be confused and hurt. It doesn’t understand that it’s in trouble for something that happened hours ago. It only knows that it’s in trouble now. 

Negative reinforcement, in general, is less effective than positive reinforcement, but negative reinforcement long after the incident does nothing but hurt and confuse your pet, thus perpetuating more bad behavior. 

Supervising is a great option, because then your dog will know what’s wrong when it does something wrong. It allows you to effectively prevent and change your dog’s behavior.

Learn to Control the Behavior

I don’t mind my dog lifting his leg in HIS yard when he is NOT on leash.  But, I do NOT allow him to lift his leg on everything while we walk or run.

He must squat to pee to relieve his bladder while he is on a leash or only lift his leg when I tell him it is okay to do so.

I don’t want him to get used to lifting his leg and marking everything all of the time.  Walks and runs are my time and I won’t be pulled to every tree so that he can sniff and pee!

Clean Up When Your Dog Marks

Clean up the urine spots well with a urine enzyme cleaner.  If he can still smell the urine, he is more likely to re-mark the area again and again.

If there is ONE favorite spot, I recommend feeding him in that spot.  Dogs will not usually urinate where they eat, so moving his food bowl for a week or two might be effective.  However, if you are not careful about supervising him he will just begin marking somewhere else!

Belly Bands Can Sometimes Work To Stop Your Dog From Marking

Belly bands which is like a male dog’s diaper can also be effective.spay your dog

I am more of a believer in training and supervision than I am in belly bands that can easily be taken off or chewed through; but, some people swear by them. 

Dogs don’t want to pee on themselves so one leg lifting in a belly band can be just enough to curb the behavior of even a chronic leg lifter.

 

Solutions For Marking Both Indoors and Outdoors

If your dog marks in your home, then your first order of business will be determining the cause of the marking. 

Ponder and investigate whether it is a temporary or isolated event, or whether there might be underlying anxiety. If there is an underlying anxiety – such as separation anxiety when you’re not at home – then you will need to find and resolve the cause.

When bringing new upright objects (plants) or furniture into the home or when moving into a new home, supervise your dog, on a leash if necessary, as it explores the new objects or new home. As the dog gets accustomed to the new surroundings, you can begin to allow it some freedom.

Not all specific anxieties will receive the same treatment.

Separation anxiety is very different from social anxiety. Treatments vary, depending upon the cause of the anxiety. Ensure that all training is reward based and that your dog has a regular and stimulating routine of exercise and play. At times when you are not playing, training, exercising, or supervising, your dog should learn to settle down either to take a nap or play with its own toys. 

If the problem is related to fear or anxiety toward another dog in the home, then separation, gradual supervised reintroduction and a program of desensitization and counterconditioning may need to be implemented.

If the pet is marking due to anxiety about noises or being separated from the owner, then these problems will need to be addressed.

 

Supervision – Both Indoors and Outside

When you are available to supervise, you should be playing, training or exercising your dog, or ensuring that it is sufficiently occupied and relaxed that there is no attempt or desire to mark. Should your pet start to wander away or head toward objects that have been previously marked, you can prevent problems by interrupting your dog with a verbal command or leash and giving him an activity to keep him occupied. 

By keeping a leash on your dog, you will be able to prevent your dog from wandering off and marking and can inhibit your dog should pre-marking signs begin.

When you cannot supervise, confine your dog to an area where marking is unlikely to occur or place him in an area such as an outdoor run where marking would be acceptable. 

If you know the specific stimuli for marking then you might be able to keep your dog away from the windows, doors, plants or furniture where he might mark by confinement or by using booby traps in the area. Booby traps can also be used to prevent access to specific areas.

If there is urine residue from other dogs on your property, use an odor neutralizer to remove the smell.

When taking your dog outdoors, you should give rewards to reinforce marking at sites where marking is permitted, and you should not permit marking anywhere else.

As was stated earlier, when it comes to marking outdoors, or even inside, the best way to stop your dog’s marking behavior is to prevent it from happening in the first place. Do not let your dog stop and mark the landscape while you are going for walks. Control the behavior. Supervise.

 

Be patient!

This is instinctual and can be difficult to curb, but if you put in the effort you will be able to stop a male dog from marking!

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Comments

  1. Pearlie says:

    I totally agree & do the same with my pup… he is a Large Munsterlander, and is 11 months old. he never lifted his leg until we went to a friend’s house a few months ago and her dogs taught him… when we returned from our trip (a week) it was a little bit of a struggle to get him back to normal (we live at a relative’s place and there is nothing acceptable to pee on here) so it was back to square one with the leash. thankfully he goes when i tell him and doesn’t go in the house…on the other hand, my brother’s/mom’s dog (lab mix) started peeing in the house alot recently…telling them to get him fixed is like talking to the wall, plus my pup isn’t done growing yet so he’s not fixed yet either. the pup wears a diaper when I go there so we know exactly who it is marking… they play the whole time we’re there, and have never been in a fight. this new batch of marking (mom’s dog) started when my mom was putting away her Christmas decorations… he peed on just about every box! we put these in storage and the next week he peed on the couch! I don’t even want to go over there because of the smell. as soon as you walk in the door it reeks of piss. I tell her & tell her to get him a diaper (or a few, the way he’s been going) or keep him crated when he’s in the other room unsupervised… after a month she hasn’t even bought any cleaner for his messes! I’m at my wit’s end. my brother can’t have a dog where he lives now and even if he could he works alot of hours… so my mom & grandpa have the dog at their place & he is used to having people there all the time. my mom works part-time as a school lunch server, and can’t really take the dog for walks because he only listens to either me or my brother…she doesn’t even walk her little bichonpoo, except to go to the mailbox! that is another story too. when I gave that dog to her, he was 3 & trained really well. now, he needs a bribe for just about everything. I’m worried that if they get the lab x fixed he will blow up with all the stupid treats they give them, he’s already slightly overweight, & so is the little guy…

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Spaying and neutering having anything to do with being overweight is a bit of an urban legend. Being overweight has everything to do with calories and exercise 😉

    [Reply]

    Pearlie Reply:

    I was under the impression that spayed & neutered dogs require 20% less total calories than their intact counterparts… That & the fact that people read the bag labels & feed according to their pets’ fat current weight, as opposed to what their ideal weight should be… I agree.. like I said though, it’s like talking to a wall… Maybe the smell will get to them & they will become more open to suggestion & get him fixed. I used to have a neutered ESS (springer) and he was in no way fat. all our dogs are athletes. I would take the dogs & put them through my version of “boot camp” but as soon as I give them back, they fall into their old habits because my mom is hard to train & my grandpa is set in his ways too, feeding them from the table, giving empty commands, etc. if I had it to do over, I would’ve suggested they adopted a cat…

    [Reply]

  2. Travis Cardinal says:

    First of all, it is so refreshing to have someone support my belief that marking is different (in the dog’s head) than emptying his bladder!
    My pproblem:
    I rescued a puppymill Maltese male who lived in a cage until he was 7 mos old, then, because he wsn’t housebroken, he was kept in a small laundry room until he was a year old when I adopted him. Soon after adopting him, I tried keeping him with me on a 6ft. leash or in his carrier, but he did not pee or poop for over 48 hrs. so I finally let him off his leash. Within 10 minutes I found a huge puddle and pile of poop in a back room. I think he had been punished for mistakes and was frightened to go in front of me. I didn’t have the heart to do that to him again so have been just trying make sure he has access to the outdoors or is taken out frequently.He now “pottys” on command outside and/or on a leash,but still hasn’t figured out that he should not go in the house. He also marks a lot, indoors and out. I also have 3 small female dogs and even though I use enzyme cleaner by the gallon, they at times go inside too. When I diaper the male, the girls are pretty good about going outside or on a potty pad. All of the dogs are spayed or neutered. The male is now about 5 yrs.old and if I diaper him, there is always a wet spot when it is removed, so it doessn’t seem to deter his marking behavior.
    I have caught him “in the act” and taken him out so often that when I do and tell him “no” he goes to the door by himself to be let out.
    Since he will now pee in front of me, do you think there is any chance that trying the leash/carrier technique again could possibly work? I probably have another 10 years with this dog…that’s a lot of diaipers and/or pee to clean up but the leash/carrier thing is a lot of work if there is no chance that it will work. Or do you have any other suggestions?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Yes, I would try that. He should not be given the privilege of house access if he is marking or peeing! Keep him with you.

    The problem is conditioning http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/understanding-conditioning-dog-training/

    He has been conditioned to the behavior so it is habit! Read that article too and it too might help!

    [Reply]

    Bobbie Reply:

    I rescued a 18 mth old male dog that was kept outside. I had him neutered. He STILL will urinate (squatting, will never lift his leg) little places in the house. Not a “huge” amount of urine, he does do that outside. I am getting sooooo frustrated ! I take him out so often that I feel maybe I should just build myself a cabin outside! Any suggestions???

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Keep him with you all the time and make him wear a belly band for a while.

  3. Terri says:

    My three year old male (un-neutered) Dachshund deficates inside to mark. Not in his own home, but in the homes of others. What can I do about this?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Same thing! Keep him on a leash so that it is not an option!!! And, NEUTER HIM 😉

    [Reply]

  4. Daniel says:

    My dog pees on my brothers bed but he doesn’t lift his leg to do it. He just kind of squats. Is this a dominence thing?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    That really depends on his breed and age and what the circumstances and relationship with your brother are.

    [Reply]

  5. BC says:

    I was standing next to a friend at a dog show. And her little dog went right on her leg. Wow!

    [Reply]

  6. Crash'sMama says:

    Just to share the story; about 11 years ago I adopted a schnauzer mix from a shelter. He was well trained and great but peed on my daughters backpak when she came home from school. This was not the first incident so he was an outside dog for the most part. About 4 years ago my boyfriend, daughter and I were in the backyard and I was sitting on the sidewalk. I felt my back get really warm and thought “what the **** is going on??” I reached back at the same time to find my back wet with his pee. So maybe I win the “Worst Marking Dog” prize? p.s. he’s now happily barking away in the backyard, loves to walk to the park so he can pee and poop on everything in between.

    [Reply]

  7. I have deen concerned that my little Miniature Pincher Buttons would start marking his territory and everyone says that this is inevitable so to read this blog has given me a great deal of hope. Living in Zimbabwe I have not come across an enzyme urine cleaner so I have been adding vinegar to my cleaner. Please could you elaborate on what constitutes an enzyme urine cleaning product. Thanks

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    An enzyme cleaner has an actual enzyme in it that goes deep into the spot and eats the urine away. Most are made for animal urine. You could probably do a search online, but as long as you are getting the urine out, I would assume that using vinegar is a good method too!

    [Reply]

    Daniel Reply:

    i used vinegar for my dog and it doesn’t seem to work. Maube it works just for certain dogs.

    [Reply]

  8. Beverley Morton says:

    How do I stop my female dog from peeing everyware in my home.

    [Reply]

  9. Carter says:

    my dog buddy only will pee in the house on my brothers bed.He doesn’t lift his leg like he’s marking but he just does it in that same place. He is barely a year old and is a retrever coon hound mix. is this a dominence thing since my dog sometimes doesn’t like my brother when he is goofy?

    [Reply]

  10. April says:

    We are getting ready to adopt a 5 year old male havanese who is not neutered. He is a champion show dog and has bred all of his life. His owner has had belly bands on him, as well as, his brothers that live in the same house. Does anyone think there’s any way we will be able to train him not to mark in our home? We have never had another dog in our house. Thanks for any advice!

    [Reply]

  11. Crystal says:

    I see so many intact male dogs left outside, or gotten rid of, because they pee in the house. Neutering usually does decrease, or eliminate the marking behavior. Male dogs that are intact are 6 times more likely to bite than male dogs that are neutered. Spaying & neutering prevents a lot of health & behavior problems, & since millions of dogs are killed in shelters every year, we don’t need any more puppies! Unless your dog is absolutely a champion show dog stud,get it fixed. It is the responsible thing to do as a pet owner.

    [Reply]

  12. Pamela Tassey says:

    I just rescued a 2 year old Male Terripoo, just neutered. I brought him home to my neutered 6 year old Yorkie that I have had for 4 years. There were pee stains all over the house from the new dog, and I have a doggie door that they both now use. Last night I went to get into bed and one or both of them had peed on my bed. What can I do? Will this behavior continue or subside? They both sleep on the bed with me, do I need to crate them or shut them out of my room? Please help!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Yes, crate them! Keep the new dog on a leash to lessen his ability to mark throughout the house and then if you find spots you will know it is your 6 year old dog that is marking.

    Utilize a crate at night at least for your new dog and then perhaps eventually you can allow him out when he has earned that privilege!

    [Reply]

  13. kari says:

    my dog is a 2 year old shih tzu i just got him neutered before he would peed outside everytime i took him out but since he got nuetered he doesnt want to pee outside anymore so at nght he ALWAYS pees on the couch, and his pee stinks like a skunk too so its really hard to get the smell out so what should i do?

    [Reply]

  14. My dog a bichon is 4 yrs old and had been difficult to potty trained. He likes to go somewhere and hide and pee. I have also found him squatting to pee in the house. We were at my sons and I found him lifting his leg and marking there. What do i do he is driving me crazy!!!!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Supervision

    You must catch your dog IN THE ACT to let him know that what he is doing is wrong! Again, this is instinctual for him to mark what he considers “his things”. So you must be able to catch him and tell him NO.

    Keep him on a leash or a tie down with you for many days. If you cannot watch him, keep him in his crate.

    Treat him like an 8 week old puppy and keep him confined to small spaces that you are in until you are certain he is not going to mark.

    This requires Talent!
    Learn to Control the Behavior

    I don’t mind my dog lifting his leg in HIS yard when he is NOT on leash. But, I do NOT allow him to lift his leg on EVERYTHING while we walk or run. He must squat to pee to relieve his bladder while he is on a leash or only lift his leg when I tell him it is okay to do so. I don’t want him to get use to lifting his leg and marking everything all of the time. Walks and runs are my time and I wont be pulled to every tree so that he can sniff and pee!

    Clean

    Clean up the urine spots well with a urine enzyme cleaner. If he can still smell the urine, he is more likely to re-mark the area again and again.

    If there is ONE favorite spot, I recommend feeding him in that spot. Dogs will not usually urinate where they eat, so moving his food bowl for a week or two might be effective. However, if you are not careful about supervising him he will just begin urinating somewhere else!

    A Belly Band covers the penis and keeps the dog from urinating on objects
    Belly Bands

    Belly bands which is like a male dog’s diaper can also be effective.

    I am more of a believer in training and supervision than I am in belly bands that can easily be taken off or chewed through; but, some people swear by them. Dog’s don’t want to pee on themselves so one leg lifting in a belly band can be just enough to curb the behavior of even a chronic leg lifter.

    Be patient!

    This is instinctual and can be difficult to curb, but if you put in the effort you will go back to having a urine free house fairly quickly!

    [Reply]

  15. Melonie says:

    im glad i came across this because i have been having so much trouble with my 3 year old male yorkie prince carter… i never understood why he urine everywhere def on my bed and in the living room… now i see i have to retrain him but its hard im starting over today and right now all he is doing is crying.. because i have him on a leash in my room and its making me sad cause i dont like to hear him cry.. idk what else to do cause i dont want him to keep crying when i have to keep him on the leash… but i want to be able to let him stay out his cage and trust that he wont go and pee everywhere … i really hope this works.. and my next step is his behavior and the snapping and biting… if anybody has anything that can help i would love to know lol … (serious tho)

    [Reply]

  16. Miley jack says:

    I have two labs both 2 1/2 years. tonight the male blatenly urinated via asqat on my sons beds- separate rooms – when they were in them. Why ? he has never done this before ? he was neutered at 6 months , as was my bich lab.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Dogs mark for all number of reasons, it could be as simple as they smelled urine marking from some neighbor dog close to their territory.

    You will have to keep an eye on them so that you can catch them and let them know this is not acceptable.

    [Reply]

  17. sherrie says:

    I have 3 dogs 2 males and a female. The males one is a Rot. and one is a S. Husky. The girl is a mix. all dogs are 2yrs old! yes I know crazy it just happened that way! We got the S.Husky last summer as a rescue. He is the one marking the house. He has been fixed. I have tried everything to stop this behavior. Ive tried the band, watching him but of course i cant be there at all times. Now he is in diapers but they dont seem to fit right and his penis sticks out and he still marks. I buy spray like crazy and clean right away. Please Please help I dont want to have to give him away he is a good dog otherwise

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    You CAN either keep him with you, or crate him.

    All my dogs don’t get along, and my 6 month old puppy is to blame. He might also eat my cats if left to his own devices…at least right now.

    So he is NEVER left alone. He is either on a tie down, on a leash or with me, outside by himself, or in a crate he is NEVER alone!

    It a lot of work and hopefully someday he will be trustworthy but for now it is just not a safe option!

    [Reply]

  18. Joan says:

    I have a 3yr old shih tzu neutered male rescue dog, Mr.T who does not mark or potty in our home but is impossible to take on a walk without marking everything….tried rewarding for just walking but to no avail. He will just stop and drop if I try to keep walking and tug him away from marking. We both need the exercise. He gets so excited when he knows we are going on a “walk” and he does relieve himself but I get frustrated because he remains in control. I don’t want to punish him for a natural instinct…must be something to deter him?

    [Reply]

  19. ashley says:

    I have a 4 year old Rat Terrier named Jack who was neuter at about 16 weeks old, he pees on everything. From the kitchen table to my bed, he even pees in the shower. He cant wear a belly band because my other dog is afraid of it and will rip it off of him. I dont know if I should crate him all the time, but then I feel hes not going to ever stop so then he will spend his whole life in the crate.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    The only way to control him is to keep him on a leash with you, crate him, or limit his access to the house.

    [Reply]

  20. Sam says:

    I have a 3 dogs and a cat, 1 male neutered miniature dachshund 2.5 y/o (Woody), 1 female spayed miniature dachshund 7 y/o (Abby), 1 female spayed chihuahua-miniature dachshund mix 2.5 y/o (Miss Weenie), and a spayed 2 y/o female cat (Cat!).

    My male dachshund Woody has taken to marking my clean laundry and bath towel in my bedroom. He leaves the dirty laundry and my wife’s laundry alone. Only mine gets marked. We never see him do, because he always sneaks to do it, so we can’t tell him not to.

    We have tried everything we can think of to stop him. We supervise him, he has limited access to the bedroom, anytime we see him sniffing around the house (like in a pattern around the edges of the room) we tell him no. This constant need to supervise is awful. We can’t watch a movie and really be into it without thinking “Where is Woody?” once or twice. And even with watchful eyes, he still sneaks around and does it.

    My wife laughs if off, but she hasn’t dried her face with dog pee bath towel after a shower. She doesn’t walk into the bedroom and find marking on/by her laundry basket.

    I’m ready to re-home him if I can’t teach him to stop it.

    Please help!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Yes he needs supervised! It is the only way to keep him from doing it, but you also need to rethink your situation.

    First shut the bedroom door unless you are in there.

    Second, put your laundry UP somewhere his little legs can’t reach. Put it in a closet or up on a shelf or on towel racks in the bathroom.

    Once your stuff is put up and he can’t get to it, it reduces YOUR frustration and anger.

    Then you can focus on where he is and what he is doing. I keep my dogs on a tie down in the living room with me until I know they can be trusted, then I don’t have to worry about them sneaking off to do naughty things.

    Naughty things are often rewarding in and of themselves. So each time he does it, he likes it and he gets something out of it.

    If you take what he likes away from him (your clean laundry) then you keep him on a tie down for a while… he will begin to forget his naughty habit and after a few months can go back to normal life.

    [Reply]

  21. ellan stem says:

    I HAVE A 3 YR MALE MALTESE NEUTER’D & HIS WT. TODAY WAS 14#..IS THAT A NORMAL WT FOR HIM? GIVE HIM TO MANY SNACKS..GOT TO CUT BACK..INSIDE HOUSE A LOT…GOES OUT TO POTTY ONLY….WHEN BARKS..HARD TO MAKE HIM STOP …??? DOES ANYONE HAVE THAT PROBLEM?

    [Reply]

  22. Jessica medas says:

    Anyone who foesnt believe in Nuetering ….go visit a dog shelter and see ALL the unwanted puppies
    and even if you want to breed…please DON’T! !!!!!AGAIN visit a shelter….
    also I have 2malesto that attacked each other when they were near….well with lots of time
    (6months) and a trainer …They now sleep together!!!!!! It can be done to have peace

    [Reply]

  23. Lisa says:

    My son has an 8 month neutered male poodle that deficates in my house every time they come to visit. I have an older female poodle and am wondering if the male is marking because of the other pet in the house. He never has accidents at his home, or in other places they visit – just my house. Any ideas on what we should do – i’m tired of cleaning up after him.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    He may very well be!!! Dogs defecate to mark as well as urinate.

    I never visit ANYONE’S house that my dogs are not on a leash so they don’t chew things, or have accidents.

    Just because they are good at my house doesn’t mean they will be at someone elses and it teaches them that the same rules apply.

    By allowing him access to your house to poop at will, he is teaching him that this behavior is okay and normal when visiting people!

    [Reply]

  24. Jennifer says:

    I have a 4 yr old rescue Cockalier who was neutered at rescue. He marks and sometimes pees on the sofa and bed, constantly. Nothing I do stops it. He wears a belly band when I am not home, and it is always soaked when we get home…sometimes “marked” and sometimes peed in. Since we put a pad in it, we can tell the difference. He does not care if he is wet, and makes no effort to get it off. I keep my bedroom door shut, but he will mark if I go in the bathroom, and I even leave the door open! He does not like to sleep with me, and sleeps in his own bed onthe floor. I do not get it at all! I am stripping my bed three times per week. I LOVE this little guy, but now I know why male dogs are always available for adoption. It is sad, but at the same time, enough is enough! He is crate trained, but he marks when I am at home too. He is like velcro’d to me most of the time. I take it as a compliment that he wants me to himself, and feels I am worthy of marking, but come ON! HELP!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    You must catch your dog IN THE ACT of marking to let him know that what he is doing is wrong! Again, this is instinctual for him to mark what he considers “his things”. So you must be able to catch him and tell him NO.

    Keep him on a leash or a tie down with you for many days. If you cannot watch him, keep him in his crate.

    Treat him like an 8 week old puppy and keep him confined to small spaces that you are in until you are certain he is not going to mark.

    Learn to Control the Behavior

    I don’t mind my dog lifting his leg in HIS yard when he is NOT on leash. But, I do NOT allow him to lift his leg on everything while we walk or run.

    He must squat to pee to relieve his bladder while he is on a leash or only lift his leg when I tell him it is okay to do so.

    I don’t want him to get use to lifting his leg and marking everything all of the time. Walks and runs are my time and I wont be pulled to every tree so that he can sniff and pee!

    Clean Up When Your Dog Marks

    Clean up the urine spots well with a urine enzyme cleaner. If he can still smell the urine, he is more likely to re-mark the area again and again.

    If there is ONE favorite spot, I recommend feeding him in that spot. Dogs will not usually urinate where they eat, so moving his food bowl for a week or two might be effective. However, if you are not careful about supervising him he will just begin marking somewhere else!

    [Reply]

  25. Christine says:

    I’m considering adopting two male puppies while I already have three male dogs…the first three were adopted all around the same time so they had very few problems…will bringing in these two puppies or other dogs in the future cause them to start marking frequently?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    It certainly may! Especially if they are not neutered and then you can expect fights as well.

    Males living together in a pack need to be neutered to get along.

    But the addition of any dog can cause marking.

    [Reply]

    Christine Reply:

    The three I have currently are all neutered, and the next two will be as soon as possible. Will the older dogs or the puppies mark or will it be done by all of the dogs?
    Will the fact that their puppies make it easier to train them not to mark?
    Thanks!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    The older dogs may mark anyway, and the puppies may mark as they age. It is more about personality (when they are neutered) than anything else. Dominant neutered dogs usually mark, but some neutered dogs never do if they were neutered young enough.

  26. Kristin says:

    Hi, I have a 4 year old dachshund that we rescued from the street. We have had him about a year now and he pees on everything, including our 2 labs and just today, my son. I am calling in the am about getting him fixed, he is an inside dog, he has a kennel and spends most of his days outside in a fenced in yard. My husband has had enough of his peeing, especially since he peed on our little one and I was wondering if you had any other suggestions on what to do with the dog. He is a sweet dog but pees everywhere on everything. Please help so I dont have to give him up!!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    He needs to be neutered ASAP

    And letting him be outside all day is counter intuitive to keeping him from peeing at will and marking since he gets to do this all day!

    [Reply]

  27. Liz says:

    I have a 10 year old male, un-neutered schnauzer. We have lived around the world and he never relieved himself in the house unless he was sick. Now we are back in the US with family that has a very anxiety ridden neutered male dog. They have been having a pissing match for 2 months now; nowhere is safe and I am tired of cleaning up after them. I feel terrible that my family feels the need to keep their doors closed now to protect their things because of him. It’s difficult to catch either in the act but I know mine is the instigator. He knows he’s in trouble when I am cleaning his mess and lowers his head and will even shake a bit though I have never hit him or anything; he’s very sensitive to voice commands and know when he’s being scolded. Hearing “bad dog” is the worst for him but he just moves to another location.

    My niece says they will get over it in time but after reading this I now know it just won’t go away. We do realize it’s not because of lack of access to go outside. I have brought both of their crates in and have set them up. I’m also going to leash mine when he is with me in the house and crate him when I can’t have him with me; there are just some things you can’t do with a leashed dog 24/7. I’ll let you all know of our progress – hope, hope. It’s carpet, wall cleaning and laundry all weekend!

    [Reply]

  28. Angie says:

    I have a 5yr old neutered Maltese and he has been weewee pad trained his whole life. Within the last 2 weeks he has been urinating in various places around the house. He has even urinated on an object in the bathroom right next to his weewee pad. We noticed that the behavior started when my Godmother came to stay for the weekend, but this isnt the first time she has stayed over for the weekend. Any suggestions or explanations why he is showing this behavior?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Take him to the vet he could have a bladder or urinary infection or even bladder stones.

    [Reply]

  29. Hi Minette. We have a 3 year old neutered male boxer who was marking weekly until we started caring for our mother’s-in law Boston Terrier, a neutered female. After we started caring for the Boston, the boxer stopped marking for two months. The only other change was that we stopped taking the Boxer for walks for those two months as it was too difficult to walk those two plus our 10 year old neutered Bernese Mountain dog in the winter. We thought that maybe walking him was contributing to the marking as we were inconsistent about not letting him mark during the walks. A week ago, we decdied to walk the three of them , the boxer marked outside a couple of times, and now he has been marking in the house just about every day. Do you think we just need to start tethering him again inside and when we start walking regularly not letting him mark outside will correct this “relapse”.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    That is what I would do.

    As horrible as it sounds I don’t let my dogs mark on walks I let them out to pee prior to a walk and then I allow them to urinate once or twice if I think they need to go (long walks) but I don’t allow them to pull me here and there for marking, it creates problems!

    [Reply]

  30. Teresa says:

    We have a 10 yr old yorkiepoo and never had a problem with him marking until we rescued another little
    dog that was starving and took him home with us,and now they are both marking all over and I have tried
    so many things but nothing has worked and now my husband wants me to find the other dog a new home.
    Can you please tell me something that will work ,I love him and don’t want to have to find him a new home ,but we are at our wits end and just don’t know what to do !!!

    [Reply]

  31. Kathy says:

    Help. We have an 8 year old male and 5 years old female. We adopted the female at 5 months and she was spayed. The male we adopted when he was 4 years. He wasn’t neutered. The dogs are both shihtzu. The male has started marking inside over the past couple of years and it has gotten extreme. He will be outdoors and then come in a urinate in the wall. Do you think it will help to have him neutered. Our groomer says it may not. I am single mom without alot of money. So I really don’t want to if it won’t work. He has recently started urinatinf on the pillow on my bed. We love him but he is ruining our home. Please can you offer some suggestions for a solution. Thanks

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    It certainly is not going to hurt and it is going to take some testosterone away!!! I would neuter ASAP it will also keep him from getting prostate cancer

    [Reply]

  32. Juan says:

    I have a 3 yr old male Jack Russell. He was neutered when he was 2. He never marked in the house. And was potty trained at a very early age. I thought he was lonely for companionship so I go a female poodle who is 8 mths. She is not fixed. Within a week of getting the poodle, the Jack began marking the furniture (specifically the couch).

    I think it is a show of dominance. I’ve caught him in the act a few times and crated him. Whatever I try doesn’t work. He is starting to mark more frequently. I need help ASAP.

    Thanks in advance.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Like the article says, you need to keep an eye on him, or put him on a leash and crate him when you can’t watch him!

    If you can keep him from doing it, eventually it will go away, but if he keeps doing it; it becomes habit! And, habits are really hard to break!

    [Reply]

  33. camila says:

    I have 3 dogs : a one year old labrador , and 2 puppies terrier mix (they’re both neutered) , a boy and a girl .The problem is the boy keeps marking the sofa and when he’s punished by my father , he pees on him ; he also pees on my father’s side of the bed . The problem seems to be with my father and he’s gonna give him in adoption if I don’t do anything .please help !

    [Reply]

  34. Alyssa says:

    I have TWO 9 yr old male teacup poodles. They both lift their leg everyhwere and poop. We have gotten all new furniture and torn out the carpet it so bad. I also have 2 female poodles that we had prior and they are potty trained. They even pee on the girls when they go potty outside. I scold them when I catch them in the act and put them outside, and then I reward them with a treat or some playing when they doa good job and go outside. They pee everywhere! It’s to the point where you cannot let them out of your site or they have to be kenneled ALL the time. At this point, I think it’s a HABIT. Where domimeven begin to break it. Imfeel so bad for them having to kenneled but they ruin everything and its embarrassing! Please help! Ps there are also 2 male big dogs outside in the backyard which yes lift their leg but they’re always outside.

    [Reply]

  35. Jennifer says:

    Can I just say that this entire story and its comments are shocking to me. Crating a dog and tieing it up all day is barbaric!!! I have had male dogs all my life and it only requires a little effort to train them not to mess inside. My dogs spend the day free in my backyard to run and play and dont ever mess inside or mark. Maybe the reason they mess is because they are so frustrated and bored! Dogs need exercise and stimulation – you cannot keep them in a box or tied up all the time. If you dont have a garden or enough patience to train a dog you should not get one!! Nobody I know crates their dogs or ties them up. I live in South Africa and if you were caught doing this here you would be liable for animal abuse!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Dogs need structure!

    Mine earn privileges and have plenty of exercise and structure, read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/day-life-crazy-dogs/

    Most people fail because they don’t have what it takes to give their dogs structure and dogs wander the house peeing and pooping.

    THEN they are euthanzied because they have formed bad habits. I would rather have people keep an eye on them and crate and use tie outs so they can teach them rather than taking them and having them put to sleep because they have accidents!

    [Reply]

  36. terra says:

    I am at a complete loss. I have a 15 year old lab that is losing control of her bladder while she sleeps and an 8 year old Pug who just began marking. I used to have a Yorkie who was the same age, both were neutered at 2 yo. He would mark everywhere and I had him in a wrap the majority of the time. Unfortunately, in July I had to put him down due to a tumor. I miss him terribly but do not miss the marking. Then 3 months later we had to put down another dog due to a blood sugar issue. I am afraid we will have to put the 15 year old lab down soon due to her loss of bladder control and dimentia. After the loss of the second dog, my Pud began humping our Lab all the time. She didn’t care just layed there. Now he is marking in our house at night! He goes and marks next to the food and water dish or one of the dog beds laying around the house. He never does this while we are awake, only at night. I can’t crate him because he has this SCREAM he does if I do. I have gates on my doors so that he can’t get into our kids’ rooms and try to keep him in ours. But just last night he marked in our room and then was able to open the gate and marked by the dishes again! I use vinegar to take the smell out and have also used an enzyme. My vet thinks he is doing all of this because of the “barking order” in our house has changed so much. I am at a loss of what to do to stop this without him keeping us up all night long! Please help!

    [Reply]

  37. Lindsey Watkins says:

    Hello,

    I have a 2 year old male Havanese dog that was neutered at 5 months. For the whole first 1.5 years of his life he was perfect. When we moved, he got lost overnight and we luckily found him the next day. Ever since then he has been marking EVERYTHING, sometimes he even poops in the house. Anything that touches the floor gets marked. He also marks furniture, clothes, curtains, other toys, etc. He is potty trained though as he scratches to go outside to do his business the majority of the time. I have no idea what to do about this behavior. He never marks in front of me Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!!

    [Reply]

  38. Aimee says:

    My male dachshund mix just dtoped going in our yard n refuses we got to walk him bout a mile to get him to go to bathroom. Or he goes in the house HELP any ideas plz

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    He may need that exercise.

    You also need to keep him with you in the house just like you would a puppy

    [Reply]

  39. Francine says:

    We just adopted a rescue teacup Yorkie male fixed. He came home to another rescue, female, who is shy and timid. We know we have work ahead but we love these two. The female, Bella, is part terrier and more abused/ignored than the Yorkie, Zach. We want to do obedience training and hope that will help. But, he’s marking a lot. Trouble is, we never seem to catch him. We can take him out, he pees a lot, then comes in and before we know it, he’s marked in one or two place. I was hoping to use the band to curb the marking and until we can do obedience training. He’s a little skittish but is the cutest, most playful dog we have had. We lost our 15 year old silkie terrier in March to a heart attack and now we’ve got these two loving dogs.

    We sure would appreciate any advice or ideas. Thanks

    [Reply]

  40. Sue says:

    Our Max is about six years old and on occasion will lift his leg. We have two Westies they have the run of the house plus a dog door to go in and out. He is a great dog but this is driving me crazy. After being trained and six years of age why would he do this occasional.

    Thanks

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Because he is marking his space. He doesn’t have to do it constantly because it still smells like him, he does it occasionally when he feels it needs to be remarked.

    [Reply]

  41. Amanda says:

    My 4 year old neutered male cocker spaniel has started marking on his and my 2 year old female cocker spaniels empty food bowls. Why is he doing this? (I clean the spots with an enzyme cleaner as well.)

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Because some times male neutered dogs mark too. I would put his food bowls in this area for a while. Most dogs won’t mark where THEY eat.

    [Reply]

  42. katie says:

    hi my name is Katie I have a 3 year old dog that is a miniature collie and he has beening peeing at the bathroom door and we are tring to do something but he pees at night when we go to bed and he sleeps all day and he ll tell u when he wants to go out between 12 and 1 he ll come in the front so I need help ……………to train my dog to stop peeing in the house……………………..

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Crate him at night if it is a nightly problem

    [Reply]

  43. Beth says:

    Hi,

    I have a 3 year old Shih Tzu male that was rescued as a puppy. We have a doggy door that he has free access to. He has always marked here and there sporadically (not enough to stress over) but with the addition of another male rescue dog 5 months ago, plus the passing away of my husband, he is marking everything and I am pulling my hair out! He really is a sweet dog but I am never able to catch him when he marks. The furniture, the fridge, the kitchen garbage cans, the doors to the closets and bathrooms, it is out of control! I’ll clean the spots and spray with a scent-based deterrent which will buy me a few days, but then he is right back to marking EVERYTHING!

    I don’t crate him and he sleeps with me at night (I’ve read not to let him as it confuses the pack order thinking in him). I work full-time (hence the doggy door). The other male rescue DOES NOT mark at all. I also have a 4 yr old Shih Tzu/Pekingese that will miss the puppy pads completely and piddle on the carpet or bare floor once in a while, nowhere near as bad or often as the boy! Any advise? Thanks in advance!

    [Reply]

  44. lou says:

    I have a 7 month year old puppy male jack Russell and he keeps destroying and peeing ony curtains I habe tried everything as is very frustrating and he is also peeing o our bed’s as well has anyone any helpful tips as we are fed up thanks in advance

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Read the article 🙂

    [Reply]

  45. James says:

    I have had a Maltese now for 5 years.. And I have tried crating him..
    And have used bellie bands..
    Nothing works..
    The dog urinates in the crate..
    And gets his band off..
    Or urinates so much that it spills out..
    I have used Natures Miracle.. And it does not work..
    I spray dog repellent on the furniture and he jumps up on the chair or couch and lays down it it..
    He even sometimes urinates in his food bowl when done..
    He has been neutered at an early age ..around 12 months..
    But nothing has worked..
    I have tried for over 5 years..
    I even hired a special trainer..
    nothing …

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/bad-habits-hard-break/

    [Reply]

  46. Minette says:

    Put your underwear where he can’t get them and close the door to your office.

    The other dog trainers said a lot of things that make sense, not from a “pecking order” stance but because if you are both in the bed and he becomes irritated with you, because let’s say you accidentally hit or kick him while you are sleeping he might bite you in the face or the attack would be seriously worse.

    Same with sitting on the furniture, if he is closer to you means a more serious bite is looming.

    My suggestion is to talk to a veterinary behaviorist, not just a trainer, who will put you on a program where you can all be safe. Read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/recommend-veterinary-behaviorist-dog-trainer/

    [Reply]

  47. sandy says:

    Hi. Just wondering can anybody help me? My two and half year old jack Russell terrier cross Yorkshire terrier is driving me up the wall. I got him as a baby as an indoor dog, I got him house trained at start and he was going well apart from the odd accident which I know can happen. But for the last year he has started peeing on everything and everywhere. I put him out during day and let him in to stay in kitchen at night time.I’d come down in morning yo find puddles everywhere he can go. On his blankets, he gets up on table to do it, if I have clothes drying on rads he destroys them. As soon as he sees me he runs to door with head down so he knows he has done wrong but he still does it following night! Last few fine days I’ve put my washing outside to dry on clotheshorse and I’ve had to rewash them all as he has marked every item he can reach! I’m at my wits end with him! Any help or suggestions will b greatly appreciated. He is not nurtured.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    First if he is not neutered, neuter him.

    Second, if this is a new problem go to the vet he may have some kind of bladder or UTI that is causing him pain and making him need to urinate more frequently. Only your vet can test for that.

    3rd leaving him out to pee whenever he wants all day is making your problem worse because he is never learning to hold his bladder during the day.

    I would also use a crate. He is much, much less likely to consistently pee in there.

    [Reply]

  48. dave says:

    i just took in an unneutered 3 yr old small male dog who marks inside and out. I will get him neutered asap and I will crate him for all unsupervised time. For the next 2 weeks he will be on constant supervision wearing a belly band and with a shaker bottle at my side. I want him to learn that marking inside and on the patio are not acceptable. This behavior must eradicated in less than 2 weeks when inwill return to work (and a whole new set of challenges will arise). Is that an unreasonable expectation? Also, is it too much to restrict him from marking on walks as well? (Oh yes, and leash training will also need to be addressed immediately as well)

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Search our site. There is a search bar on the right hand side of the page that will help with leash training and leash manners as well as anything else you want to search.

    I NEVER use shake cans or noise as a means of scaring a dog or correcting them. I don’t want my dog to panic or run if they hear a noise in public.

    Instead I teach them appropriate manners by using my voice and making sure there are consequences for bad behavior. But, again… not noise!

    [Reply]

  49. Tonya McDaniel says:

    I have a 7 yr old not fixed male Chihuahua, who never marked his territory before. I let family move into my home and their male Chihuahua would mark all over my house. Now my dog will do it. I have cleaned with all types of urine remover but it does not seem to help. Now they are moving out and I will have to go through and throughly clean my house and furniture. Which I have no problem doing, but how can I stop it from happening again?
    He was abused when we go him and I had to house break him at 4 yrs old. Can you please give me some ideas on how to fix this situation? Thank you

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    You are going to have to go back to square one with potty training, keep him on leash, take him outside and know that he has created a bad habit along with bad behavior, read this to find out why that matters http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/bad-habits-hard-break/

    [Reply]

  50. Mykee says:

    I have two JR Terriers. One well behaved female and one 7 month old Male whose testing me every chance he gets! Sometimes he does great other times he’s just bad. He got neutered recently and well he seems to be pissing more and more! I’ve caught him I’ve told him no, I’ve cleaned up right after and what does he do? Waits a day or two and bammmmmm! Someone please help me. My female took sometime but she caught on.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    You have to stop allowing access to the house. Keep the male on leash and teach him appropriate behavior. Also neutering takes time for the hormones to work their way out of their system and habits, like peeing in the house are hard to break

    [Reply]

  51. DJ says:

    I have an 18 year mix (12 lbs) My BF has a 4 year old unneutered basset hound. (about 60 lbs) We just all moved in to a new house. I think they are having a pissing war. It is terrible. I keep my dog in a small room with a gate. His dog is constantly whining at the gate. I am wondering if he is peeing through the gate to my dogs room, (can this happen?) as he stopped peeing in his normal spots and I just can’t imagine he just all the sudden stopped peeing. My dogs room is a flood every morning. AND the other morning my little dog was yelping terribly, we went downstairs to find his dog on top of mine, going to town. Don’t know if he was able to “do” anything but scared my dog to death. He had knocked my dogs gate down to get to him. I was worried he would break bones on my dog but he seemed okay – The basset had the run of BF’s house. He got treats for barking…that’s all he got them for. He slept on the couch and in bed with BF. He would get in trash and drag it thru the house. He sits at table and whines and they would feed him off their plates. – I will not allow him in to our bedroom or the living room. (all gated off). We crate him during day but not at night. He has a big bed he lays on but whines constantly at bottom of stairs bc he’s gated off. I make him lay on his bed while we are eating….all this has been hard as I have BF thinks I am being cruel by giving dog rules and is sabotaging it when I am not around. Am I going to be able to train this dog that’s set in his ways or do I need to train the BF?! I understand this is a big change for everybody, especially his dog, but i want this to work.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    You will not be effective if you are not BOTH consistent.

    And, read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/bad-habits-hard-break/

    [Reply]

  52. Maja says:

    I have a 5 year old yorkiepoo. I had him since he was 3 months old and had him litter box trained. It worked really well and he only had minor accidents on the catpet. They were puddles in the middle of the floor, not marking. When he was 6 months old i had him fixed. Not too long after, we kept a friend’s dog for a coule of weeks, at which point the other dog started marking our house, my dog picked up on that behavior, even the kicking of grass after going outside…. It has been 5 years and he still does it!!!!!! I love him soo much, i can’t imagine giving him away, but i have tried everything and i cant take it anymore. He marks his bed, our furniture, curtains, laaundry baskets full of clothes, my stove, refrigerator. if there is anything on the floor, he pees on it. I dropped a shoping bag in the kitchen, he peed on it. He still uses his box, but even when its empty he still marks! Ive replaced ALL of my furniture, many times, i have no rugs, no carpets, i clean his mess constantly. He does it when he’s had attention all day or barely any. He’s healthy, full of energy we play and cuddle him all the time, i cant figure out why he wont stop. I do not allow any other animals at my house and i’ve recently been keeping him confined in the kitchen when i’m not around, it doesnt help. I moved his box to the basement because the wood floors have started to absorb the urine and corrode, i need help, fast. Thank you.

    [Reply]

  53. Lindsay says:

    Why would my 5 yr old neutered mutt begin marking my husbands stuff? We have been married for 11 years now and no changes to anything

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    No way to know, your husband’s smell may have changed, he may be going somewhere different or the same places that are visited by other different animals.

    It is hard to tell why dogs do this, we don’t understand because we don’t have their noses or instincts.

    [Reply]

  54. Sunny says:

    Here is one, no one has the answer to. I rescued a 8 y.o mix min-pin chi 3 years ago. He does. It, mark, pee or poo in the home. 5-7 hours clean and dry. Outside on walks, he squats only and marks every 20 feet, if you allow. He can squat mark, 6-20 times. I, do not allow more than 4 then he poops. But, dog walker, sitters, family, allow 8-20. He marks, on on dog home yards. If he sees a dog, if he sees a person, if he smells, a dog urine or poo. He marks, if you stop to cross a street, upon arriving at the curb of the next street, etc. think little red riding hood and bread crumbs home. I use to believe he was dominant as after poor, kicks his back legs. Ears erect, confident posture. However; now, after 3 years, I think, passive, no confidence, like reading face book social for him? He is soft and passive with me, defers, in and out of doors, and house rules. He was raised I’m told, with two dogs and a girl. We are just two adults. His medical is fine all medical causes ruled out. Any doctor house out there with an opinion? I think mine, is the most correct so far. Or OCD I. The marking dept as hounds are to the sniffing dept? Vets stumped.
    Sunny in New England

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    The problem is that it is a habit and it is allowed. Read both of these http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/bad-habits-hard-break/

    http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/marking-walk-allowed-house/

    [Reply]

  55. Tonya says:

    Maja. I am sorry to hear about your problem, I’m having a similar problem with our three year old Maltipoo and I was surfing the internet for help. The only thing that I have found that helps is keeping him in diapers which I make myself. It’s a pain to me because I have to keep constantly taking them on and off when he wants to go outside (we live in the country with two other dogs and they go outside frequently). But it does stop him from peeing in the house and now I’m trying really hard to get the pee smell out of the floor. I’ve tried just about everything and I still smell it. …..UUGH! I feel for you, you have my sympathies. Maybe if all else fails you can use diapers too?

    [Reply]

  56. Melanie says:

    I have a 3 year old Yorkie Poo”Maverick” that I adopted when he was year old, I also have a male Morkie “Cooper” who is 4 years old, they are both neutered, however Cooper was neutered when Maverick joined the family, Maverick did not start marking right away, but as soon as I noticed he was I immediately had him neutered, Its been several months and it hasn’t stopped , Ive tried showing him and telling him NO, Using the News Paper, I am not having any luck! he ruined my carpet, had to pull it up and now he’s ruining my wood floors! Please help! not to mention I’ had to throw out an expensive couch! its causing my husband and I to argue all the time, My Husband is at his witts end , he says I need to potty train him, he installed a doggy door, and they use it , so now he is even more frustrated.. help!

    [Reply]

  57. Paula says:

    We adopted a 2 year old bully about 8 months ago. He’s really good about letting us know when he needs to go out, but he still hikes his leg and marks things all over the house.
    He’s not neutered. Would having him neutered now help.
    His former owner died of cancer, so we’ve no idea if he’s always done this or not.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Yes, neuter and read the article and follow the guides

    [Reply]

  58. Rosie Carmona says:

    I have a 5 year old chihuahua who is potty trained, but recently we bought a.baby chihuahua who is in the process of been potty trained and does at occasion has accidents, but now my old who never pottied inside is starting to do it. They tell mr he is marking. Please help how can I stop this from happening , I’m frustrated 😰, bc I’m not young myself anymore to be cleaning up every 1 hour. Waiting for a response, thanking you in advance for your help.

    [Reply]

  59. Betty says:

    3 small dogs 3 to 9 pound 5 yr old to 10 yr old they are kicking legs on furniture and lower part of wall alot of money for furniture and repairs to wall one has been nutured but he’s just as bad I’ve tried everything please help. If possible send response to above email thank you. Betty

    [Reply]

  60. Danny says:

    We have a 6 months old rotti mail. We hade visitors over about 3 weeks ago, they bought their dog which stayed still all the time they in one spot, whilst they
    visited. Now our rotti continues to urine in that very spot. Which just happens
    right the doggy door (so no excuses). We have sprayed STOP dog & cat repellent spray on the area, no good, rubbed his nose in it then out the dog etc.
    etc. could please advise us what we should do. Thanks Danny

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    i recommend you neuter him and it looks like you may have to go back to square one with potty training now. rubbing his nose in it certainly won’t work.

    [Reply]

  61. Emily says:

    We have a 8 year old pit pull that has been marking the corner of our bed while we sleep I put a piece of foil on it and it doesn’t stop him. He now has started marking the baby gate that goes in the doorway to keep ihim in our room at night. He gets crated while we are not home for this reason. Any ideasideas of how to stop this. We don’t want to crate him at night being he is crated 8 hours a day as is. Thinking about the belly band listed in article. Thanks

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I would rather crate than form a bad habit of having him pee on beds. What happens if you want to visit someone?

    I would think this is an unacceptable habit. And, if you are meeting your dogs physical and mental needs there is no reason he can’t sleep in a crate at night… let’s face it; you aren’t interacting with him while you are asleep.

    [Reply]

  62. Rochelle says:

    I have a 1 year old uneutured Maltese male. He likes to mark inside and outside. He have came along way with marking in the house but he still do it. I have caught him in the act a lot of time and I scold him and clap loud but he just wag his tail and run off. My dog do not get that this is wrong! I decided that I was going to start keeping him in his crate and just take him out for walks. And if he is not in his crate I will have him next to me on a leash. Will this be a good training method? Also, I have a 8year shihpoo and he was neutered at 8months he never marks. I recently had got this Maltese and had to potty train him and he marks. The last owner didn’t train him at all. She didn’t take him out for walks, she just put newspaper down.

    [Reply]

  63. Holley McCree says:

    I got my dog from the Humane Society at about a year old. He was neutered when I got him. He has all kinds of anxiety issues. He refused to go in a crate. I put him in the bathroom when I went to work to prevent him peeing in the house and many times returned to find blood all over the floor from him frantically pawing. Still, 4 years later, he has destroyed the floors and many other things in the house. I used enzyme cleaners. I tried to watch him all the time. I get up at night to let him out. However when I am fast asleep he’ll sneak to a favorite area to pee. I just bought a belly band. It works except he now learned how to get it off! I do have 2 cats but there have been no changes to our household since I got him. I want to get new flooring and don’t want it ruined again! I’m sick and tired of my house smelling bad!

    [Reply]

  64. Lori says:

    my daughter recently moved in with me and brought her in-tact 1 year old husky. i have 2 dogs, a neutered male and a spayed female. the husky has ruined my dining room floor, it is has dark stains everywhere. she refuses to get him neutered and crating him is useless, he breaks every cage we have put him in. we cannot be with him every second because we have to work. any insight on how to curb his bad behavior would be very welcome!!!!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I have an aluminum dog crate. It was $700 but it is cheaper than new walls and new floors and is pretty impossible to break out of; they are usually made and marketed for police dogs.

    [Reply]

  65. Pearl o'keefe says:

    I’ve got a 5 yr old male and he’s weeing over all my things

    [Reply]

  66. KAROL says:

    I married someone with 2 dogs, a cocker & a rottie. the cocker thinks he owns the whole house. He pees on everything, wont stay off the couch, lays on my husbands clothes that he leaves on the floor. He has a bed, I make him use it. I won’t allow him on the couch or on my clothes if they are on the floor sorting for laundry. Every time we bring in new furniture he pees on it. he has a dog door and I still find pee. Garbage can, dining room table, tv stand, sm stool, water cooler or empty bottles that have been changed out. I want to choke him but my husband loves animals more than people. It’s causing strain on the marriage and we have been turned down because of the dogs while looking for a new rental.

    [Reply]

  67. Sickening says:

    I know the feeling ! I met my boyfriend 1 year ago and been together ever since, moved into his home. He has a 7 year old American bull dog that loves to pee on everything! He has his own couch , and when he’s outside during the day when we’re at work, he has a whole garage and outside kennel.
    To me, this dog lives good. But he pees on couches, walls , my jacket , almost everything. I want to know if getting him neutered would fix this. Are they neutered? I heard it helps. There’s also the belly band I heard that helps ? I’m gona try it. Other that trying little things like this I have no idea what to do . It’s causing a lot of arguments.

    [Reply]

  68. Joanne says:

    Tried to have my maltipoo neutered at 7 months but he almost died from a reaction to the pre medication. I had to wait till he was 7 months as one of his testicles did not descend. For the last 3 months he is marking on everything. If we take him to someone else’s home we keep a belly band on him. Now the past week he has decided to poop in the house. He is put in his crate when we are not home and he sleeps in the crate in our room at night. We are besides ourself. He is a very small dog (5lbs). and they gave him very little meds before the surgery was to take place. We don’t know if we should try to have him neutered again with the hope his heart rate does not drop to a dangerous level again.

    [Reply]

  69. Kathy says:

    I have a 10 year old female shitzu that has cancer, she had it taken out 1 week before Thanksgiving, 1 week after Christmas took he back for a check up and it is back with vengeance, she doesn’t look like she is in pain, she plays and does her normal everyday things, she is however on pain pills every 12 hrs and antibiotic for an infection. I have a male and female shitzu/chihuahua mix that will not leave her alone and is constantly trying to get to her, they both get into her bed and starts licking it, my male is peeing EVERWHERE yesterday I let him outside when he came in his underneath was just drenched in urine.

    [Reply]

  70. Sandy Chiz says:

    We purchased new living furniture and installed new carpet in March 2015. My granddog has been here many times, stayed and visited many times and now he walks in and lifts his leg on the couch. I have not had any other animal in this house. What is going on?

    [Reply]

  71. robert says:

    our 3 1/2 yr old shitzu/bishon just started marking all over the house. he is trained to tell us when he needs to go outside, yet he still marks like crazy. we use the urine enzyme sanitizer you mentioned but that makes zero difference; he keeps marking same spots inside.

    Now, we don’t trust him to take him anywhere which is becoming a major pain.

    HELP!!!!!! HELP!!!!!!!! HELP!!!!!!!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Take him to a vet, any time there is a new behavior like this it may very well be health first.

    [Reply]

  72. Cheri Archer says:

    I have 5 males, 4 related, 2 shih tzus,(5 and 3 yr. old) 2 shi poos, (18 mo) 1 shih Tzu mix (2 y.o.) adopted.
    I’m getting them them neutered they all mark everywhere with lifted leg (except in my bed) and even poop! and have now started fighting. The fight starts with 2 and the others join in. The 3 y.o. growels a lot, even at nite when they all sleep on my bed. Will neutering help with this problem and what else can I do.

    [Reply]

  73. cindy says:

    I have 2 male dog ( not neutered) they have beginning to mark all over the house and having aggression behavior toward each other They are 1 year old can you help me

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    It is past time to neuter! often intact male dogs don’t like each other

    [Reply]

  74. Nelle says:

    I have an 8yo mastiff cross who has started breaking into our garaged area and marking our gym equipment. He breaks in using force; we’ve had to replace FIVE wall boards and today he has destroyed a gazebo that we leaned over the hole he has created. We are living in a rental, so he can’t keep breaking the walls! He has a large back yard, large covered area, a play mate AND we run him every second day. Why is he doing this? How can we stop it? He is desexed.

    [Reply]

  75. Terry Glasco says:

    I am fostering an 8 year old 10 pound male American Eskimo Dog. He came to me intact and the rescue group can’t get him neutered for another six weeks. I have two other dogs, a 28 pound neutered male Eskie and a six pound spayed female terrier mix. They all get along well, but the foster dog, although he is house broken, is marking my bed, chair and desk. I have read the usual advice, get him neutered before he is one year old, clean up the odors, etc. I just need some practical guidance on how to deal with this until he can get into the vet and then adopted by his forever family. This is the only issue he has.

    [Reply]

  76. Mrs s walsh says:

    My 7yr old jack russell has never cocked his leg inside bungelow but ive noticed there is a wee mark on floor in consevatory near table leg, my husband has seen him on 2 occasions cock his leg and shouted no and he has stopped before weing why is he suddenly doing this.

    [Reply]

  77. Aimee says:

    I have an 11 month old male pug and lately he’s been out of control. We have him trained to go on a pee pad because my boyfriend an I are not home to constantly let him out to pee. When we are home during the day he knows to scratch at the door to let him out and he’s pretty good about it. At night he always uses his pee pad and always misses. It’s like his aim is horrible. He will pee directly on the corners and edges of the pee pad. I have to clean up his mess every morning. we let him out to do his business before he goes to bed at night and it’s a nightmare the next morning.
    He escaped his area that we have him locked in and terrorized our furniture and recently started to mark a lot. He Peed on our couch cushions (which he is not allowed on) 4 different times and would mark our coffee table as well. I dog sit my sisters two dogs sometimes and I know that could be the reason for him marking his territory, by they have been over about 4/7 days a week since we got him (back in July 2015) and he never marked before. I don’t know what to do. Help!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    crate train!

    [Reply]

  78. Darlene Brown says:

    I would like to know why my Chihuahua mix is starting to pee on my bed 🏨,just where I sleep.He never did it before and now he’s peeing in my bed.

    [Reply]

  79. Denise says:

    Wonderful to read your info. I so want this little dog, but he has gotten away with a lot. I know that it is me that needs to “really” do the work, and I am retired, but very active. I can do all the things you mentioned, and spend that time it will take. I don’t have any questions, you were very thorough, and I will re-read if I get stuck.

    With this guy, I will need to use the leash to keep him next to me as I believe that he was left in a cage for possibly months, maybe longer. So yes, patience, which to me is the best form of love:) Denise

    [Reply]

  80. Denise says:

    I wanted to add that I don’t have my dog yet, I am getting him in the next day or two though. He has not been worked with at all where he lives, so I will be practicing all you have taught me here, starting with the “marking” issue. He is just about 2 they think, and they neutered him right after they got him 10 months ago. But, a case of “no time” to spend training him.

    Maybe when you moderate my first reply you can add these together or something. Thank you again, I know I keep saying that, but you’ve done such a wonderful job of explaining it all, if people would just read it, and do what you say;) denise

    [Reply]

  81. Amber Taylor says:

    My bf has brought his 1yr. old Jack Russell terrier/Chihuahua mix(male) to my house and I have a 1yr old Australian shepherd/collie mix(female). My dog does not pee in the house and she is well trained. His dog however is not. He does not listen to simple commands and when he’s around my dog doesn’t want to listen. We weren’t in the house for even a minute and he marked on my boots. We keep him on a leash since he doesn’t listen to us and so we can watch him closer. I’ve read a few articles and found some good advice. Anyone have further suggestions or ideas on how to break him of it? I’m open to anything.

    [Reply]

  82. D. Rice says:

    My stepson has a 6-7 yr. old male yorkie whom he takes with him everywhere he goes. The dog hasn’t been neutered. Each time they visit, the yorkie goes around marking furniture, walls, items, etc., and also poops on the floor wherever he desires. My stepson thinks it’s funny. Is there anything we can do to houseproof our house to prevent his dog from marking? They only visit once or twice a year anywhere from 2 wks to a month. Another issue is if there are other dogs around, all he wants to do is hump them, beit male or female. Stepson laughs and walks out of the room without restraing his dog.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    you cannot change a dog that is not yours.

    [Reply]

  83. tonya says:

    I have a pomeranian I adopted over 8mos. ago, when I first 2 weeks of having him, there was no accidents of urinating in the house although previous owner told us that he had no house training., after 2 weeks or so , he started and I can’t get him to stop, > had just jough\ new carpet right before I agreed t [ taking him.,
    I am a brain aneurysm and stroke survihor, my husband and others stronger suggested that I get a dog f [r some therapy because I’m home alone most days, I’m very limited on what I can do around the house and cleaning up behind him is taking a toll on me right now., in the beginning I would never allow him upstairs unattended,where my husband did even though he may be in the same room with my husband at first but he can sneak off into another room and do his thing and my husband don’t track or check behind him where I do and find his misbehavior and we old discipline him by wiping up the urine on a cloth and put it in his face and tell him no and bad and he would just walk away in shame, I now can’t get him to stop, my yard don’t have a closed gated door , so I can’t let him out on his own . I don’t want him to run off as he have done twice.. fortunately both times we got him back., I don’t really know for sure his age his third owner told me he was 2.
    He could be 3 by now., I don’t know. His first owner passed away and second owner went blind, 3rd owner sis. Of 2nd could no longer keep him due to her son having other big dogs.

    [Reply]

  84. Tammy says:

    My dog has to wear a diaper or he has accidents but when he is by my sister’s house with her little dog he has no accidents how do I stop him from having accidents at my house .

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    My guess is he can smell his previous accidents.

    [Reply]

  85. michael says:

    I have a 3 yr old male German Shepard he was neutered before he was 6 mos he has never marked and was the only pet now 3 days straight he has pooped in the hall way or daughters bedroom. the existence of a female dog entering the house seems to be why is this happening is there something that can be done he was potty trained he doesn’t pee in the house only poops in the house.

    [Reply]

  86. cliff reedy says:

    I have 3 boy chihuahuas that peed like crazy even with belly bands I even put ladies pads in them to help absorb there pee and trust me they were soaked like crazy

    [Reply]

  87. Margie says:

    We have a male 9yr old 4.5 Shih Tzu neutered perfect trains sweetie. But lately and only in our bedroom he goes to different spaces and in the master bath,pees and then rub his face into it! We brought him home when he fit in the palm of our hands,he’s never done anything but an occasional poop in the bathroom. He has also started walking around with his tail down roaming around coming to us and then climbing behind our necks. We are so worried he is so cute and loving but all of a sudden is having issues.

    [Reply]

  88. Yolani says:

    Hi i wonder if someone could help me please… we had a british bull dog he was 5 when we adopted him from the spca he is now 11 years old and has arthritis and is on medicine for it and use to maybe dig a hole here and there but has started urinating against everything outside ( washing machine and other appliances which he has never done before) even though they have always been in the same area as him all along he only now started doing this and he is pulling washing from the line and peeing on that too why could this be happening and how do we stop it he is also now digging more aggressively and frequently. PLEASE HELP

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Take him to the vet, it may be due to a medical issue

    [Reply]

  89. Alicia Lewis says:

    I have two male dogs and I have recently moved to a new house and have moved in with my boyfriend. My boy dogs keep marking on all of his stuff and I am never able to tell which one did it. I have tried to let them outside constantly and I also had them on a leash in the house for awhile until recently when they hadn’t marked in the house for a few weeks. I have also tried to praise them every time they go to the restroom outside My poor boyfriend is frustrated and I feel like I have failed as a pet owner. I’m not sure what I can do at this point.

    [Reply]

  90. Marilie says:

    My miniature dashund is 6 months old. . .he suddenly started peeing in the house. It only happens twice a day (that I know of). . .

    Don’t know what to do to make him stop. . .it only started a week ago !!

    Please help ?!

    [Reply]

  91. Vanessa says:

    I have a 7 month old Shitzu and he was neutered Tuesday but this morning he marked my bed. I have a belly ban on order but I have him in a crate when in gone and a leash when I’m home so I make sure he don’t what else can I do????

    [Reply]

  92. I have a five month old German Shepard puppy mix. If you ask him to go outside he will go out and pee and poop. Five minutes later he lifts his leg ans pees on the floor or into his crate. He will also lit his leg to pee out of his crate. I believe he knows to pee and poop outside but I feel he chooses not to do it. He is getting neuteted in three weeks from today. Will this hlp the problem? If not what can I di? I take his food and water away at seven pm at nught. I also have an eleven year old Boxer the does not have accidents in the house. The puppy was rescued from a neglectful owner that kept the litter if puppies in a shit and piss filled box. He never cleaned them. When I git him he was covered in piss and shit. The mother dog stopped nursing them just before five weeks old. So I got him at just under five weeks old. I had give him water in a siringe. He didn’t know how to lap up the water. What can I do. This is getting really old really quick. I’ve trued those enzymes to get rid of the pee smell but they didn’t work. He still pees in the same stops.

    [Reply]

  93. Lisa says:

    I’m at the end of my rope this dog
    I have named Teddy ,I have had over 2 years now, was abandoned in my subdivision and now I know why. A male peakapoo, fixed with high anxiety in cars and with other animals around. He marks in a sneaky way. I try to catch him, but only when we are outside can I see it. so I have to take him to the place he marks and show him the band and then show him the marking by letting him smell it off my finger after showing him the area. He understands but doesn’t care. He is now beginning to ignore me when I tell him no outside hedoes it in a speedy way then runs from me when I go after him. I want to scream!!! He is very stubborn, but he is a very sweet dog other than that. does tricks What in the World can I do it’s been a year since I started crating and banding ?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    What makes you think the dog understands that? Is that the way another dog would communicate? My guess is that after this he is nervous to go potty around you for fear of being punished.

    Instead restrict access and keep an eye on him and praise him when he goes potty outside.

    [Reply]

  94. Karen says:

    I have a 3yr old male chihuahua and we had him fixed before he was a yr old. About 6mo later we got a female and he started marking when she went into heat. They have potty pads in the laundry area and he marks the wall and door. I bought some of that no mark stuff and of course that didn’t work, I have also taken him to the door many times and told him no potty here.
    Can you please help as I am lost.

    Thank you,
    Karen

    [Reply]

  95. Stephanie says:

    I live with my parents and I have two dogs and they have two dogs. I noticed my male dog started lifting his leg about three or four weeks ago. Two weeks ago we found outy mother has renal cell carcinoma. Could that be why he is marking in the house? My husband passed away three years ago from cancer and I was just wondering if memories are coming back to my dog too.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    probably not

    [Reply]

  96. Kathy Vlahovic says:

    I adopted a sharpei about 4 months ago. WE walk in regularly but when we go out even for an hour he pees on the lanai. Sometimes both but most of the time he pees and we even walk him right before we leave to see if he is spiteful. He is 50 pounds and should be able to hold it at least 3 to 4 hours. WE are home all day and he does not do it. He is little over a year about 15 months and have no knowledge of his past owner. He never goes in the house. Any advice to get him to only go outside when we walk him?

    [Reply]

  97. Barbara says:

    Need help desperately I have a female miniature dachshund she uses a P pad my daughter lives with me and she has four-year-old male miniature schnauzer and he peas where ever he likes he does not lift his leg I don’t know what to do I tried keeping them in a certain room try crating him he tears up the P pads any ideas

    [Reply]

  98. Misty says:

    I have 2 miniature dachshunds, one 6 and the other 11. Normally I don’t have any problems with then using the bathroom in the house. They both let us, me and my husband, know when they need to go out. Now I’m having problems with my 11 year old marking in my house. He isn’t using the bathroom, he is marking. This is completely out of his norm. For the past 2 days I have had to fill in for someone at work. Makes me have to leave early and neither me nor my husband gets home to let them out, well until we both get off at work for the day. We have come home for the past 2 days and found where he has Marlene on the corner of the couch, wall, blanket hanging from the couch, chair and the entertainment center. I’m guessing that it’s behavioral but I don’t know how to fix it if it is. Could be just be mad at us or me for leaving him alone during the day. Normally, everyday, I leave for work at 12 noin, but the past 2 days I’ve had to leave at 6am, filling in for someone, leaving him home all day.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    If my dog can’t be out in the house unrestricted because of behavioral problems, I crate them and work on house training until I can trust them again.

    Crating can prevent the problem all together when it is happening when you are not around.

    [Reply]

  99. Leanne says:

    I have 2 Maltese Shitzu’s and the male is 8yrs old and the female is 5yrs.. the male wees everywhere but only during the night or he sneaks away while I’m eating dinner or watching a movie and then he wees on my pillow, during the nite it is up the hallway on a door lounge bin anything.. he is desexed… would love to know why he is doing this.. I have followed, use stuff to stop him peeing locked him outside given him a treat when he pees outside… I just don’t know what yo do next…

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    It is time to restrict his access to the house. If you can’t watch him, crate him or put him on a leash or tether with you until this habit is broken.

    [Reply]

  100. Jessica says:

    I have a nine month boxer pup. He does well at our home but when he visits grandma he is constantly urinating in her house. She does have a 11month male lab and an older female mix who are both fixed. I am assuming it is marking behavior. Not sure how to help curb this because he is maybe over there once a week and it is when I’m not home.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    He needs to be on a leash or in a crate. If he is on a leash and cocks his leg you can correct the behavior. If you just allow him free roam; little to nothing will correct this instinctual behavior

    [Reply]

  101. I have a 2 month old chiquaqa mix..how do little dogs pee so much, ando what will stop him peeing in my bed..I let him sleep with me because I have sleep ton go to work..help

    [Reply]

  102. Kassie says:

    My dog is 3 years old and has been potty trained since about 6 months, he never has accidents and has always squatted to pee….The last 4 days he has been hiking his leg and peeing on things in the house! Christmas tree, door way, corner of fireplace, kitchen table, corner of steps etc. Why?!? Nothing in his routine has changed. No new pets or people, same dog food, nothing at all is different. 🙁

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I would take him to the vet if this is a new behavior and make sure it isn’t a bladder infection.

    [Reply]

  103. Deb says:

    My Chihuahua marks all’s the time he’s ruined my wood floor near doorway he can’t be in a crate because he howls and neighbors complain….I’m thinking of using belly bands. He peed on my new coffee table. One other female dog and cat in house…. he’s extremely needy. Im so frustrated

    [Reply]

  104. Karen Moore says:

    My rescued Yorkie/schnauzer mix is estimated to be 9-10 years old and was already neutered when we found him on the streets about 3 years ago. He has started a habit of marking with both pee and poop while on a walk. We give him ample opportunity to go in designated areas but he refuses and will then ninja pee or ninja poop while walking. He has control of himself, because he hunches while pooping and lifts his leg while peeing. All while walking. This started about 6 months after our baby was born. He didn’t do this until we had him for over 2 years. How do I correct this?

    [Reply]

  105. Omg I have a year old male teacup poodle and a 3 year old golden doodle female. He marks everything. I have tried everything. The belly band- he pees in it without hesitation, spot spray, wee pads, everything… but he does it no matter what… it sux because I have ano almost 2 y.o. baby, and one on the way. He makes living nicely impossible. It’s so bad that even the golden doodle tries to hide and cover up his mess with anything she finds lol

    [Reply]

  106. Michelle Power says:

    Hi. Our westie is 11 months. We have other dogs and he gets on great with all of them and they all play together. The one problem we have with him is that he pees on the other dogs. He is the only one who does it and we can’t understand it. This morning he peed on our jack Russell while he was lying on our bed minding his own business but normally its outside. If one of them are standing still he runs up cocks his leg and pees on them and runs off and a couple of times he has done the same to me.

    Can you give us some advice please?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Is he neutered? This would be a great place to start if not.

    [Reply]

  107. Jennifer says:

    Kassie my shih tzu does this too. He started it one day when a friend came over for a doggie play date and her dog marked my house. Since then my dog continues to mark the same spots or new items purchased that sit on the floor. Even my wacuum clear box i bought and sat aside until i was teady to open it a few days later. Picked it up and it was covered in dried urine. I was like come on!! He ealso does it at other peoples houses if he smells where another dog has marked in the same spot. In order to keep him from peeong on my Christmas tree i added a mini tree beside it at a spot he frequently marks on top of a pee pad and it drew his attention there instead of my tree. Its so annoying and embarrasing, especially when we have extended visits at families. Im gonna try putting his food there next tome. Thats one i havent tried. Mine is not neutered because it will take away his AKC certificate and someday id like to have an offspring. Hes such a pretty dog i dont want to lose his bloodline. Especially if this is a learned behavior and it doesnt help to do it. Ive tried belly bands and they help with it not getting on things but he still marks in it. Last time it caused an infection on his skin that required anitbiotic treatment and yes it was changed each time it was wet. Im sure it was the heat it held in along with moisture. Just stick with trying to stop it. Im really thinking ot may be an anxiety issue as well. He gets so emotional when i leave, even just to walk outside and back. Makes me feel so bad.

    [Reply]

  108. Can it be my make dog is doing this because my other dog is in heat? He just started doing it.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    absolutely! spay and neuter is a great way to avoid this behaivor.

    [Reply]

  109. My 6 year old intact male mastiff has started urinating on furniture. He walks up to it right after he has been taken outside to urinate and will urinate again on the furniture.
    I have recently moved in with my fiancé and of course he came with me.
    Why is he doing this? He has never done this before.
    I have his neutering appointment booked…will this help?
    Thank you in advance for any and all suggestions 😊

    [Reply]

  110. Kim says:

    I am having the same exact issue has Kassie, my make is also 3 years old and neutered. He has gone to the vet and has no issues. This just started out of the blue, I am now having to crate him again because it is getting out of control. He just hikes on the table, doorway, furniture, close hamper, I am finding it several different places. I don’t know what to do????

    [Reply]

  111. vickie says:

    Help we are new owners of 2 maltese one is 14 male and a 5 year old female. what can we do to keep the 14 year old from marking. They are very sweet

    Thanks

    [Reply]

  112. Kelly Sundberg says:

    How do you know if an adopted male, neutered rescue dog is marking or just not potty trained? I have never owned a dog that was not a puppy when I got it. Some days there are large puddles in the front hall and other days, I find several small spots of very yellow urine. He has now even started to poop in the front hall and today he pooped in my bathroom and “peep” on my bed. I am getting frustrated because we crate him during business hours, and I let him out for a long period of time after he eats, and he will still come in the house and lift his leg on the table!?! I am currently debating rehoming him due to lack of time to really train him but he is the sweetest dog, but the going in the house stuff has got to stop. I tried crate training but the second I turn my head…it’s too late. He pees in Belly Bands and no matter how much I have him outside, he will run in to pee. HELP!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Marking is peeing ON THINGS, usually vertical things like walls, chairs, clothes. Potty training is peeing on the floor in one big puddle.

    [Reply]

  113. Melanie says:

    Dogs have such a strong sense of smell. If a female dog in the neighborhood is in heat your male will surely smell it. They don’t have to be close to each other to smell each other. It can be somewhere she peed outside mixed with a nice breezy day or a number of other ways that male dogs smell females. Or it could be that he’s 3. Mine started around 2 so 3 wouldn’t be a huge surprise. I doubt it’s a bladder infection in a 3 year old dog with no change in diet or anything else. Unless you notice blood in the urine or a cue that he’s in pain when peeing I would not think a vet visit is necessary. I saw a guy use a cone wrapped with a pee pad and then set it ontop of another pee pad for his dogs. Awesome idea although I find pee pad to be an added expense. I use plastic paint drop clothes. They have diff thickness in case u want to reuse or rather just throw it away. I get some tape that doesn’t peel off my paint and just tape it up. Hes 75lbs so bc he is so large I change it out right away or bleach and a super absorbant rag really helps so I don’t have to remove it everytime. I have 2 spots just in case days I’m working bc once it’s soiled he will not use that spot again until it’s been cleaned. It works like a charm. As if anything about pee could be charming. Mine started marking bc my neighbor got a cat! Male dogs are funny that way. I guess it’s time for a new invention!

    [Reply]

  114. Liz says:

    3 year old olde English bulldog, neutered when he was 6 mo., Started peeing on items in the house. No new pets, my eldest son did move out 3 months ago. The things he is peeing on are not usually in those places (a ladder, various boxes that were being moved, garbage can left in the middle of a room, detergent bottle that was in the floor) My husband thinks the dog is just lazy, I think it is something else

    [Reply]

  115. Brandon says:

    I have a beagle basset mix that is 5 years old, spayed and neutered. We just adopted him and he marks his territory EVERYWHERE. I’ve cleaned every day and gotten the urine smell out of just about everything. My bedroom is the worst urine smelling area and it’s very frustrating. I’ve caught him spraying multiple times especially after I’ve cleaned. It stinks so bad. We’ve tried belly bands as well and he hates them. He whines constantly until it’s taken off so he can urinate all over. This dog is making me never want another animal again.

    [Reply]

  116. Tera says:

    I have a 7 year old neutered male shih tzu. He has been excellent with house training all these years. Will even wake me in the night to go outside. We live in a townhouse, and recently the neighbor got a new puppy. My dog has horrible aggression with other dogs/cats in our yard (he’s fine w other pets at groomers, vets, and parks.) I’ve recently discovered sever spots in my home where the dog has marked. These are not accidents these are deliberate markings on pieces of furniture. In fact, he has been outside, came back inside and urinated. I’m sure this change is due to the new puppy, and the fact that the back yard is shared with many pets. I’m at a loss I need my old dog back, and cannot have the marking inside my home. Any suggestions on how to curb this behavior. I kennel him when not at home, I reward with treats after peeing outside, I have pointed out his mistakes and lightly punished, I baby gate off the area he likes to mark in (the living room) when i’m not in there with him. I literally took him out this morning, turned away for less than 3 mins and he had marked in my kitchen. All of this right after a horrible encounter (on his part) with the puppy in the back yard. Please help, I’m lost!!!

    [Reply]

  117. Rachel says:

    Two males one is 8 intact never marked in the house till I brought in the other male he started marking at 1 year old so then my other male started marking got the younger male fixed around his second birthday and he still marks in the house and so does my 8 year old.my 8 year old is not healthy enough to be fixed (heart disease ) I’m going nuts with this marking in the house the smell is horrible.the old boy cannot be in a crate or leashed to me as he gets anxiety with both things.the other one could but just really hard to do cause he’s really energetic.i dunno what to do I’ve caught both of them multiple times and told them no in a strict tone it doesn’t matter they still won’t stop.

    [Reply]

  118. Catherine says:

    I have two female dogs and I recently adopted a 2 year old mini dachsund who is also recently neutered. He seems to be potty trained ( scratches at the door to go out) he peed on the couch 🙁 so frustrating. I even had a belly band on.

    [Reply]

  119. We have a male Catahoula that was nuetered when he was 1. He is now 5 and the past 3 months has began marking(peeing) on things in our barn, like the loft ladder, the garbage can, ect. He has been around these items his whole life and nothing has changed, it’s like a light switch just turned on and he started. any suggestions?

    [Reply]

  120. Carrie says:

    I have 4 dogs 2 male 2 female. All spayed/neutered. My smallest is my sons yorkie who is only with me part time when my sons working. He marks everything including me. It’s disgusting. Lately he started just hiking his leg wherever he is. On the sofa, chair etc.

    I don’t know what to do. He marks then the others who are housebroken follow him. Now it’s out of control. Help

    [Reply]

  121. Carrie says:

    Forgot to add I have a doggie door going into fenced yard.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I think doggie doors encourage this because they get to mark and pee on things all of the time.

    [Reply]

  122. Diane Hicks says:

    My chihuahua was potty trained at 6 weeks. No accidents. Continued to. mark even after being neutered. No amount of watching an!d cleaning made no difference. He was very smart and trained well on all things but marking. My husband will never consent to another male because of this.

    [Reply]

  123. Rache; says:

    my two year old fixed male is constantly marking i have done everything in the tips literally even feeding him in the areas he just pees in his dish…even having him on leash for about a week or so with no marking and as soon as i take him off he goes and marks.i can’t live with a dog constantly for the rest of his life attached to me by a leash.he is perfectly healthy been checked out and everything and nothing is working im so beyond frustrated.

    [Reply]

  124. Marianne says:

    My bulldog/pug mix gets anxious whenever he cannot be with me, as long as he still sees me. He will whine as long as he can see me. I have found that covering the crate with a large towel or blanket so he cannot see me quiets him and he settles down.

    [Reply]

  125. Jessica says:

    I have 2 male schnauzers. 3 and 2 both intact. They have been potty trained fully from 20 weeks on. We’ve never had an accident until about 6 months ago. one of them we don’t know which or both has begun marking. The first time was my husbands pillow, then my pillow then both of my kids beds and now it’s anything vertical he/they can get to. Sometimes we go a couple weeks without an incident and sometimes we have 4 that same day. They have been on the same food since they day I brought them home, my husband and 2 kids are home with them every day all day. We have had no changes at all. We have baby gates up all over the house and yet they still manage to get into the “restricted areas” ie: my room. And of course it’s only the places that absorb. It couldn’t be on the tile or hard wood that runs through most of the house. It has to be on beds or rooms with carpet. I don’t want to neuter for my own reasons. But I’m stuck.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    When you choose to have intact dogs you are also, often, choosing the behaviors that go with them.

    [Reply]

  126. Leslie says:

    My daughters 8 yr old neutered chihuahua/JR terrier has marked in my house since the first time she brought him here. Everywhere, multiple times a day. She cleans after him but it is relentless. He even soils his belly band. Is there any way possible to stop this behaviour?

    [Reply]

  127. TJ says:

    Maybe a dog marked the Christmas tree in the Forrest and he is trying to claim it

    [Reply]

  128. Pam Armstrong says:

    I have an older dachshund that is probably 7 years old. We have never been able to successfully potty train him. He will pee on everything in the house, but he will not do it while we are watching. I have to put pee pads up against the furniture etc. It’s so embarrassing when a guest leaves their shoes, backpack or purse on the floor or couch and our dog wets on it! I purchased two different brands of belly-bands and he can somehow manage to remove them. I don’t know what else to do.

    [Reply]

  129. Lynn says:

    I had a mature, neutered male dog that marked inside the house for probably 7 years. I was not able to walk him very much because of work responsibilities. This dog stopped the urine marking very soon after I began to walk him daily, usually at the same time each day. It also helped that I had just retired and spent more time with him, as I was home most of the time. Hard to say if the daily walk did the trick, but I have to believe it did! Amazing, complete turn-around.

    [Reply]

  130. Cherie says:

    My terrier/ poodle rescue was neutered around 1 1/2 yrs old. Doesn’t have accidents or mark in the house. On walks however, he marks everything. At the dog park same thing….today he lifted his leg to a chair someone was sitting in. Since he had been on the street/neglected before I found him, I think it’s his insecurities or something. How do I correct this?

    [Reply]

  131. Angela says:

    Get your dog fixed!! There are dogs being killed in shelters every minute because someone wanted there dogs bloodline!!

    [Reply]

  132. Jayne says:

    Please neuter the dog. We don’t need any more puppies in the world. The AKC papers are always the dogs .
    You can not show a neutered dog. But you are stressing out this little dog. The more stressed , the more spraying.

    [Reply]

  133. Rebecca says:

    My dog is neutered and he still marks so that is so NOT true !!

    [Reply]

  134. THERESA says:

    I have a 4 year old Chihuahua. He marks in a number of places in our home. Is he too old to get neutered? Please I need advice. Thank you very much.

    [Reply]

  135. Patti says:

    I have a 6 year old neutered Maltese Shih you mix! An excellent dog from day one! Never goes in the house but pees on everything on the deck. He goes out of door wall and proceeds down the stairs into the fence yard pee and poops then come back upstairs onto the deck and if I am not right their at the door he will left his leg and pee! On my plants, leg of outdoor table, deck box, hot tub , and my New Chair😬 I am so frustrated ! He just started all this this year! How is your dog doing now?

    [Reply]

  136. Dax says:

    Your Mastiff is marking in your new surrounds for several reasons, primary of which is that he is trying to establish his place as the Alpha in the pack, and this new “dog”, your fiance’ is competing for that position… since you may not have established that you are the Alpha. Or, he is competing for the top Beta position with your fiance’. That he isn’t neutered doesn’t help at all, nor does the new surroundings.

    [Reply]

  137. Sally says:

    We will have a visiting dog for several days next week. He visited this AM and lifted his leg on a chair. Did nothing, as his owner yelled NO! (no wet) What do I do when he stays other than watch him ALL the time? Will close doors to rooms that we are not occupying.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Put him on a leash for awhile

    [Reply]

  138. Diana says:

    My dog started marking when we leave him help

    [Reply]

  139. Connie says:

    We just got a puppy and put his little crate in our bed. He is near us and content all night and keeps crate clean. But he is four months. Worth a try.

    [Reply]

  140. Sheyanne Hersom says:

    My Miniature Dachshund is 2 and a half years old. He has very recently started marking around the house, especially in my room and the living room. He is neutered, and we thought that this habit had been broken. I have tried telling him no and putting him in his kennel.We moved to this house two years ago and got a three year old Chocolate Lab. She was a breeding dog, but we had her fixed I don’t know what else to do. Does anyone have any advice for me. I’ll try anything at this point.

    [Reply]

  141. Carolyn says:

    HELP, I have a 11 month old Teddy Bear. At age 5 months he can down with meningitis at which time we almost lost him. 6 minths later he has recovered but ever since he started lifting his leg he has been marking in the house. I am beside myself. I have him in a belly band but he marks with that on. The neurologist has finally felt it is safe to neuter him but not guarenting this will solve marking issue. He is the sweetest dog and it is a miracle that he has come through the menigitis this well. I dont want to give him up for adoption as I love him and have thousands of dollars invested in vet bills, any suggestions greatly appreciated.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Use the search bar at the top of the page to search articles for potty training

    [Reply]

  142. Winter says:

    Our 9 year old rottweiler has been marking everything for a long time before i got him. But the previous owner said that he breifly had a small female in the house amd thats when it started. Will getting him fixed work?? Its looking like my only other option.

    [Reply]

  143. Vicki Hufford says:

    I would LOVE to know if you have fixed this problem!! I have 2 male dachshunds that hike the furniture all the time and we are moving into a new home and getting new furniture and just cannot let them ruin my new house. They usually poop in the back room which we have accepted they do, but the new house has doggie door and fenced yard which we are hoping it will help. Otherwise we are just going to have to block them in the kitchen area where there is no carpet or furniture. I will miss them in bed!! One is fixed and one is not. Doesn’t seem to matter.

    [Reply]

  144. Lisa Malone says:

    I am distressed by this unresearched advice to neuter any male dog that marks. My comment does not refer to showing dogs – it is in reference to the dog’s health and well being. Neutering golden retrievers dramatically increases the risk of all sorts of joint problems, and mast cell tumor – an often very aggressive and heartbreaking cancer (two which I lost a 4 year old Vizsla and am in the process of losing an 11 year old golden/lab/sharpei mix). Be a responsible pet owner to control the unwanted pet population and to manage marking through persistent training and getting your dog the outdoor time and exercise he needs. Please don’t just sacrifice your pet via neutering. Here’s the science: https://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2014/11/05/neutered-golden-retrievers.aspx

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    One research study, on one breed of the same family does not science make.

    [Reply]

  145. Cody Palmer says:

    My male thats a little over two yrs old shitzu has been neaurtered and stopped for awhile ,now he has started back and I found several places he is marking when I vacuumed yesterday , I’m so disgusted

    [Reply]

  146. Rob says:

    Our 8 year old jack russell just started doing this since our daughter and her boyfriend moved into our home with their boxer pup, and now reading this we have a better understanding why. He is a rescue who was already “fixed” and never did this before until recently…. thanks for the info, is a great help!

    [Reply]

  147. KW says:

    9 year old chichua (blind) easy potty train got at 12 weeks old and 12 year old maltese got at 2 years old is slower learner but potty trained … now 2 yr old pug/yorkie we got at 12 weeks old … pug yorkie pees outside and immediately inside on everything on furniture on walls .. even his crate sometimes .. he is caught in act and punished he even pee on blind chichua! He has seen vet … sometimes even though nuetered and never seen a dog cannot potty train til now.

    [Reply]

  148. Robert says:

    I wound up taking in a starving female Miniature Pincher a year ago, that someone dumped off near my house because she was pregnant. Out of the 6 puppies she had, only 4 survived, 3 males, 1 female. They have been very good until recently. For some reason one of the boys have been taking to peeing on my pillow. They all sleep on the bed with me at night and they are real good. In fact I use training pads in a closet in case they have the urge to go at night or if I have to go out for a while and they use use it if they have to.
    But this peeing on my pillow has only started a few months ago and it seems like it happens when I let them in from outside, if they get excited and if I forget to take the pillow off the bed. They only pee on my pillow and I can’t seem to break them of that and it is driving me nuts when I go to bed and find a wet pillow!
    Anyone think a belly band or diaper might help stop this?
    I have some allergies so I’m a bit hesitant on using sprays or chemicals.
    Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

    [Reply]

  149. Mo says:

    My 7 year old dog has been doing this for some time now, but it have gotten worse. He is not fixed. Will fixing him help the situation as he is so old?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    certainly won’t hurt and yes, usually helps

    [Reply]

  150. Marie Mellone says:

    i would of course take him out before bedtime, and pick up his water a few hours before beftime, you might want to try and said up a few hours after you go to bed to take him out one last time, it’s like a new born baby.

    [Reply]

  151. Sez12345 says:

    My 17 mth old border has just been neutered and since then he has been marking on the doorway on the heater 🤮 vacuum I don’t know what to do

    [Reply]

  152. Brandea Blackburn says:

    My boyfriend has a 4 year old pitbull American bull mix we got got into a new apartment together and he marks on our clothes, bed, blankets, couch, chair and so much more. He only does this when we leave, we have tried kennels but hes only destroyed and escapes them. I dont want to remove his balls yet, but hes leaving me with no other option. I just need some help getting him too stop.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    neuter

    [Reply]

  153. Teresa says:

    We have a male 4 lb. puppy. He is marking everywhere and the vet said it was too soon to neuter him. I am waiting another week. I can’t take him to anyone’s home because he is so quick I can’t always catch him. When I do, I let him know it’s not ok but I am at a loss.

    [Reply]

  154. kelly says:

    I have a neutered 3 1/2 y.o. American bulldog that is completely housebroke (and perfect in every way) and just recently adopted a 2 1/2 y.o. spayed german shorthaired pointer/ red heeler mix for him to have a companion as I work long hours and feel like he gets lonely. The girl dog has been eliminating on the rugs, beds, dog bed, and couch! I keep her in the garage while I work and she doe not eliminate in the garage or in her crate that she sleeps in and stays in when I am not able to watch her completely and she does not show any of the symptoms associated with a urinary tract infection. S.O.S

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I would utilize the crate, stop using the garage and keep the dog with you in the house.

    [Reply]

  155. Cathy says:

    I must, respectfully, totally disagree with your suggestion the you get your dog fixed at 16 weeks!!!!! They are not at all ready growth wise or mentally for such an adjustment…..do your homework on that people, talk to your vet, ready the studies etc, on this and Do Not get them fixed at that age!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I will politely decline and say that it fixes a lot of behavioral issues

    [Reply]

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