How to Potty Train YOURSELF, The Truth About Potty Training

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potty training a min pin, how to potty train a dog, how to potty train yourself

Thanks Maui dog remedies for the photo

Okay so most of you who are reading this are probably already potty trained. The heading sounds ridiculous, but I want you to “re-think” everything you know about potty training your puppy or dog. The problem is that we think it is “the dog’s problem”.

  • He isn’t potty trained yet
  • Or he has accidents
  • Or he sneaks off at night and urinates or defecates
  • Or he has accidents when you are gone
  • It feels like you have tried EVERYTHING (you have no idea how often I hear this statement).

But The Truth is You are Looking At It ALL WRONG

Your dog or puppy having “accidents in the house” is more about YOU than it is about anyone else. You see, it is your job to teach your dog and make sure he doesn’t have accidents.

Tiny Puppies

potty training a min pin, how to potty train a dog, how to potty train yourself

Thanks daily puppy for the photo

Tiny puppies are like “tiny babies” they all gain bladder and bowel control at a different rate.

Some puppies show extreme control at 8 weeks and are able to go several hours without the need to urinate or defecate in their space. Other puppies gain this control at an older age.

I have owned them both. I have had puppies that at 9 weeks were basically potty trained. I had one pup, that was fully potty trained and had full access to the house (only utilizing the crate for training) when he was 16 weeks old.

And, I have had “dirty puppies” the ones that seem to urinate on themselves and in their crates for weeks.   For more on dirty puppies click here  But there is one thing that remains the same no matter which puppy “hand” you get dealt.

It is up to YOU to do the work.

Puppies don’t pop out of the womb knowing anything about potty training.

And, depending on the mother and the breeder and environment depends on how clean your puppy has a desire to be. Some puppies want to be clean, and others have no problem laying in their own poop.

But it is our job as the humans in their lives or their human parents to make sure we are giving them the training that they need to be successful members of our families. And, for most of us that means being and keeping clean!

What Must YOU Do?

potty training a min pin, how to potty train a dog, how to potty train yourself

Thanks Dog care knowledge for the photo

Set your alarm!

Puppies need to go out every hour or two to make sure they are emptying their bladders.

They also need to go out after exercise, naps, and eating or drinking.

Think of their tiny bladders and bowels and think about how little space there is in there after they eat and drink!

That may help to remind you how often they need to go outside!

Watch Them

Watch your puppies or even your adult dogs that need potty training like a hawk hunting prey.

Don’t let them wander the house, put them in a play pen or even let them play outside without keeping an eye on them.

YOU must get used to their schedule and notice if they haven’t pottied appropriately.

Go outside with them.

It doesn’t matter if it is 50 below zero, or raining cats and dogs 😉 you must accompany a dog that is in the dire straits of potty training!

If you don’t go with them and watch them how will you know if they have relieved themselves or if they still need more time or are more likely to sneak off and poop or pee in the house?

It starts with getting them outside regularly and following them around outside, getting used to their schedule and recognizing when a “pee” didn’t last as long as it usually does, or a “poop” doesn’t look as big as usual (signifying they weren’t done 😉

For instance, I know exactly when each of my dog normally poops (one of them poops at 4:30 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.  the other at noon)

And THEN

Now this is important Pay Attention You MUST follow them around INSIDE your house.

I don’t use puppy pads because they encourage my dogs to go potty inside, which, in my opinion is counter productive to what I want!

In my experience, when a puppy or a dog sneaks out of the room or is suddenly missing they are getting into trouble. My dogs choose to stay in the room I am in, unless of course they are attempting to steal something off the counter, chew something they shouldn’t, or have an “accident” inside.

Do My Dogs Make Mistakes?

potty training a min pin, how to potty train a dog, how to potty train yourself

Thanks Wise Geek for the photo

They did! They were all “new” or puppies at some point.

The Difference Is

I keep mine on leash or follow their every move until I can trust them (which is usually several weeks or a few months) If I can’t watch them they go into crates until I can!

At my house you don’t get privileges until you EARN them; and BTW I still keep an eye on them 😉 Because, after all, I am the human and it is my responsibility to make sure my dogs are properly trained, maintained, and that I don’t have to waste time cleaning up messes!

 

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There are 49 Comments

  1. natalie says:

    Hi, I have a question. My dog was a rescue dog shelves very well potty trained when we are home. I didn’t have any problems which her until about 6 months after I rescued her. Now when I leave her home alone she will pee or poop in the house or she will get into the trash. I hate creating her everyday when I am at work I feel like it is unfair to her. She doesn’t seem to like it much and every time I leave and put her in it she acts like it is a punishment. I don’t know where to start to fix my problems I am having with her amici would really prefer not to crate her everyday. What can I do?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    She needs to be crated. You are looking at it all wrong.

    If worked with and taught dogs like being crated and it takes the worry and the stress out of life for you both when you are gone.

    My dogs often choose to be crated. One is in her crate right now with the door wide open and my other likes to crate himself too when it thunders or when he just wants a nap.

    BUT crate training has to be done while you are home too, not just while you are away. Otherwise the dog has to deal with crating AND being left.

    Dogs don’t do much while we are gone anyway, they mostly sleep. By being out and allowing the dog to feel anxiety it is creating a problem that she wouldn’t have if she wasn’t out loose.

    Then when you get home exercise her and spend time with her, but I would sincerely crate her while you are gone. http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/crate-training-basics/

    [Reply]

    Jeannie Reply:

    Yes, yes, yes to Minette! Crating is not a negative experience unless you create the negativity. A lot of dogs will object at first (because after all, they really would like to go dig through your trash), but dogs are den animal and all of mine will go to their crates willingly just to hang out there. If you only crate when you leave then crate = abandonment. Don’t set them up that way. Put a treat in the crate, then say “place” or “crate” and give them the treat only after they go in. Let them come and go with the door open while you’re home, but teach them that it’s a good place to go. When they potty outside you HAVE to catch them doing it right in the moment and tell them how great they are. You can’t look away or just send them out and hope for the best. If they don’t potty outside, they go back to the crate with no negatives but close the door and try again in a few minutes. Once they go, they get house privileges for a little while, then rinse and repeat. It works, I promise.

    [Reply]

    whisperingsage Reply:

    When i was a kid we had at least 7 dogs of various breeds at all times. This was the 60’s. and we never heard of crating a dog back then. These were watch dogs and part of their job was to protect us, the children and our mother (single mom). They came in the house and had a big yard, and we spent a lot of time with them and didn’t have a problem. If they were crated they couldn’t protect us. Later when Brabra Woodhouse went on PBS, we loved her and learned how to leash train her way, though we knew when we were kids as we went for long walks with much of the crew a lot.With our mother of course.

    Minette Reply:

    Here is my latest crate training article http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/sleep-knife-pillow-crates-crucial/

  2. Christine says:

    I took in a gorgeous male rescue 5 yrs old and although loved dearly he urinates in the house some times, although he knows it is naughty. I do not believe in smacking my dogs and wonder if you can suggest anything. I do have another male who does not do this.

    Thank you.

    Christine

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Keep him leashed and teach him what you want.

    [Reply]

  3. Anne Holliday says:

    Hi Chet, I do not have a garden so my dog is an inside dog. She pees and poops on newspaper at my place but when I take her to someone’s house she can poop on the carpet even if I put down newspaper. What do you suggest I do? She is only a Miniature Dachshund but it is still a mess. Thanks.
    Anne

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    allowing them them to pee and poop inside sometimes and not others is confusing. I would choose one or the other and stick with it and keep the dog on a leash when visiting anyone else’s house

    [Reply]

  4. Tom Bryan says:

    We have a four year old Yorkie and still is not potty trained. We also have three other dogs that are indeed potty trained. suggestions?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Read the article and highlighted articles 😉

    [Reply]

  5. Linda says:

    I agree to what was written but my questions is how do you house train a dog that has never been house trained. I let her out every 1 1/2 to 2 hours a day I have a yard and other dogs. I see her go like she should they come in I give them a treat and off in the house she goes again and she can be out side for a long time. It is making it so I have her in the crate as soon as she comes in. My other dogs don’t do that but when she goes I have a male that marks his territory which makes it so I am cleaning all day long and if I miss it I smell it very strongly and I look until I find it. I am tempted to put diapers on this dog it is so bad. She is in good health. I have trained dogs and puppies but this one, I am at a loss.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I keep mine on a leash or a tether (never left alone) until they are potty trained.

    Once there are NO ACCIDENTS for several weeks/months then I teach them to ring a bell to let me know they have to go out.

    [Reply]

  6. Debbie wallbillich says:

    We have a male min pin Pom and he just turned one year old. He is a clean dog but still isn’t totally trained. We keep him in a doggy play pen, his crate or on a leash inside, and he pees outside every time we take him. But in a year he has only pooped twice outside. It’s been rough training him because my spouse lets him run loose when I’m not there. My spouse is untrainable and even explaining everything to him, he still let’s Max run loose. What do you suggest? I’m off for the summer in a few weeks, so I can completely put time into taking Max out every hour. Our yard is not fence so he’s on lease outside. Thank you for any advice you can offer! Debbie

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Keep him on a leash inside the house, he will be uncomfortable pooping in front of you and you will learn to see the signs when he needs to go outside and poop.

    YOU have to catch him and get him outside and keep him on a leash tethered to you for as long as it takes to get him potty trained!!!

    Spouses are harder to train, but let him know he is creating a bad habit that will be almost impossible to change he doesn’t stop!!

    [Reply]

  7. Betty says:

    Thank you! I go outside every time my 5 yr old Pom needs to go. We just took up the carpet in the living room and put wood which has helped a lot! She came from a women who bought her at 6 weeks and then started taking In dogs without homes. Lollabell hated those other dogs around her mama so the women sold her to me. I know she has separation issues and doesn’t leave my side. Thanks for you emails. Bettyb

    [Reply]

  8. Nick Cassizzi says:

    Can I purchase a CD which covers all these subject. I have special problem besides all the other stuff…and that is…he does not like to go out and do his duty when it is either raining or wet out. How do I purchase CD?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Here is our store https://womach.infusionsoft.com/app/storeFront/showStoreFront

    and if you are not sure which program to get you can contact customer service at info@thedogtrainingsecret.com

    [Reply]

  9. Jennifer says:

    I am having a hard time training a 2 year old rescue yorkie mix…….HELP!!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Read the article and subsequent articles listed within!

    [Reply]

  10. Jeannie says:

    Really great article and this is a key reason people give up on dogs and hand them off to shelters – completely unnecessary. I’ve house trained a 60 lb 2 yr old previously feral american foxhound, a tiny chihuahua, and everything inbetween including half a dozen fosters who were not house trained. Everything Minette says WILL work – it only depends on you actually doing it.
    Crate training – this is not cruel or punishment, and all dogs should be crate trained at least initially and should always have some kind of den space available, even if that means your bedroom when they’re responsible grow ups. Don’t count on that though – some dogs need a crate when not supervised.
    Tethering – works for so much more than potty training. More difficult with tiny dogs, as you don’t want to step on them or drag them and if you’re like me and move fast, that’s a challenge. I favor plopping the tinies into a cross body sling and paying attention when they get wiggly. Works fine.
    Do not take your eyes off of them when outside and praise them as soon as they’re done doing it right – NOT while they’re in the act, or they’ll get excited and stop short.
    Ignore mistakes. Try not to let them observe you cleaning up and use an odor controller on the spot. I have my own yard, so with newbies, I will clean up and put it outside, then take them outside to see where it needs to go. Lots of people can’t, but it seems helpful.
    It isn’t as hard as you think.

    [Reply]

  11. Ginger says:

    I have a rescue female that marks. What can I do about that? She can go potty outside and come in and mark. When she goes outside, I go with her so I know she has potty’d

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Walk her

    and keep her on leash in the house

    [Reply]

  12. many people have told me that for every month a dog is they should be able to hold their urine for a hour my dog is 8 months so he should be able to hold it for 8 hours from what i been told i take him out reguraly but he is still going every 2 hours and still has accidents i have been keeping him in a crate to try to teach him to hold it but he will still go inside the crate even though im taking him outside to relieve himself is his going every 2 hours normal for his age?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I’m wondering if he is either marking or has some kind of urinary or bladder infection.

    Take him to the vet first to have that ruled out.

    Neuter him if he is not.

    And, remember water in, water out. My female often has to go out ever 2 hours or so in the summer because she runs outside and drinks so much water. The more water she drinks the more I know she will need to go out soon!

    [Reply]

  13. Marlene says:

    My 5 month old Min Pin is not potty trained. I have been using a potty pad, but she misses all the time and I want her to go outside, BUT she is constantly eating leaves and twigs and everything else out there. I take her out, but she won’t poop out there, she has pooped once, she prefers to wait and poop in the house instead. I do use a crate for her, but you can”t leave her in there too long or she will mess in her crate. If I leave the room for an hour or so she chews her potty pad up! What do I do?? Please Help!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Read the article and use a leash in the house.

    potty pads only encourage pottying in the house. Choose one or the other

    [Reply]

  14. Valerie Mollard says:

    I was incorrectly advised to use puppy pads as well as taking my Shih Tzu outside to the backyard. She is one year old (adopted at 4 mos) and she asks to taken out first thing in a.m.by sitting at door and whining. However, she roams around checking out everything for at least 15 min. (she can’t take heat for longer) and runs immediately to the pee pee pad and does her thing. But the pads are too expensive and she’s missing sometimes now. After she uses pad she comes running to me as if she wants me to know she’s done something good and wants approval. How do I transition her to go outside exclusively. She loves rain, and snow so that’s no problem except for matting. lol

    [Reply]

    Cristen Reply:

    I have a diabetic, blind dog, that was a rescue. I work and have no choice but to have somesort of pad out for her. She drinks lots of water and can flood 4-5 normal sized pads in one go. I have regulated her blood sugar better now through diet and insulin, but she can still swamp a floor. I found a better solution to spending 30 a week on pads. I bought one of those pans that go under your washing machine, I think it was like a 33 / 36 inch pan, I am sure they make a smaller one. And I bought 4 of the washable pee pads for people who are in a bed. they are the sam size as the pan. I just wash them with clorox and air dry them, and they are good to go. It was an envestment of 33 dollars for the pan, and another 32 for pads online, but i have used them over a year now, and they look new. If you can, and are home enough to take your dog out training would be better. But if you do not have a choice this is a good solution.

    [Reply]

  15. jean says:

    I have a 6 month old Pom. She sleeps on the bed with us. Often she will wet the bed even though she has been outside before going to bed. I have never had a dog to do this before. She will also wet a small dribble when she gets excited (someone comes over or she is picked up.)

    [Reply]

  16. Cole says:

    I have 24 dogs, and all but one are potty trained. (A few of my males mark in the house, but it is a rare thing these days.) I clearly can’t just watch one particular dog all day, but I am home 24/7. I have raised nearly all my dogs since birth and have successfully potty broke them all… But one.

    She is now a 7 month old standard poodle from a litter of 19. She has had a few urinary infections in the past, so her lack of blatter control was not something to scold her over, but she was corrected. She is clear and healthy now, but still messes in the house. And she has NO problem going in front of my mother or father. But she will NOT go in front of me.

    She is crate trained, she sleeps in one at bed time, when I’m not home, or I’m working. (I’m a dog groomer.) So she does know better. But its only been the past few months that she has stopped messing in the kennel. She HAS to sleep out soon on my floor, as she kennels with my two intact male Standard Poodles, and since we will be breeding, she very well can’t be sleeping with them for long. I don’t have room for another kennel in my room. She likes to mess in my room at night.

    She will also mess in my upstairs hallway unless I rush her outside and go out with her in the mornings when she’s coming out of her kennel. She doesn’t do it all the time, and it is getting better, but my younger male Standard is only 3 weeks older than her and is 100% potty broke, no messes in the house, EVER. So I don’t know what to do with her. She goes out every two hours with the rest of my house hold. Everyone gets run of the house, and she typically stays glued to my side unless she is eating or getting a drink. I typically don’t have to watch her as she is always under foot for me. Any suggestions??

    Oh, and I have tried the leash thing, she freaks out and chews through the leash or simply becomes dead weight when I am trying to do my daily chores about the house, though she walks perfectly on a leash, she will not tolorate or cooperate when she is leashed and not going anywhere.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Clearly she is in charge of training. She cannot be with you underfoot 100% of the time, have accidents and not have accidents in front of you.

    My guess is that “correcting” her when she had a bladder infection made this problem much worse and much more complicated. I assume this is why she doesn’t like being tethered to you as she is afraid of being corrected if she needs to go.

    I can’t imagine having 24 dogs and dogs that mark and urinate in the house and being able to successfully teach a puppy that one dog can do it but he/she can’t… think about how confusing that must be.

    So if you really want to see change you first need to visit your vet as bladder infections are often recurrent and don’t always resolve with one round of antibiotics. If she wasn’t tested post antibiotics chances are she still has it; or she has gotten another.

    Once the vet clears her then it is time to use the tether and stop “correcting” her for something that is natural. It is after all your job to make sure she gets outside and doesn’t have accidents.

    [Reply]

  17. Cole says:

    I think you misunderstood EVERYTHING I said. And you instantly jumped to the conclusion my house is covered in dog urine. I RARELY have a boy mark in my house, very rarely. My female poodle is the only one to pee in my house really. And as for correcting her, its not what you think. She isn’t spanked or yelled at or anything like that. She is very quickly ushered out to the backyard and I wait until she resumes going and finishes before rewarding her. She does go up to the back door and sits to let me know she needs to go out. And she is promptly let out.

    My vet has completely cleared her of infections, and I didn’t stop training her during the infection, I simply tolerated that she’d be having more, but kept up her training. And when I say under foot 100% of the time, means the moment I get up to do something, she is directly by my side and typically takes her naps beside me on the floor. She doesn’t have accidents all day when it is just me home, but when my mother comes home, she feels the need to just go to the bathroom infront of her, as if I am not trying to train her.

    I just don’t understand it. And its not the whole, being teathered to me thing she doesn’t like, its the fact that she isn’t going anywhere and has a leash on her. She will sit and stare up at the door and cry, and when I am doing my work online, it gives her time of me not being able to pay 100% attention to chew through the leash.

    I do hope more explination will help you understand better. I am not the average person who is clueless, I know what I am doing, I am just stumped on her, leaving her out side is not option either, not only will she bark all day, but my neighbor feels the need to call the cops on me if any of my dogs are outside for longer than a half hour, because its “animal cruelty” and while the police do nothing, it is still a large hassel to have them come over, show the dog, explain the situation, show the backyard and fill out papers and whatnot. So that has been ruled out since she has started with this issue. When she was a younger puppy, she was great with potty training, but at about five months of age, she started peeing in the house again. And I make sure she is let out every two hours on the dot, I don’t slack on my training.

    [Reply]

  18. alicia oh says:

    My dog lives inside and she is well potty trained when I am at home.(she goes outside to wee or poop.) But when I am not home I want my dog to use a pot instead of going on the floor. She goes on the floor instead of using pot!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    unless you are gone for very long periods of time, it is better to crate train them to hold it.

    If that is not going to work then I recommend using the right tools inside. http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/indoor-potty-training/

    [Reply]

  19. My dog is potty trained some of the time. But he potties Oon the rug sometimes. I’ve scolded him but he continues to do it. He uranates on paper. But will not do his bisness on the paper . Please help!

    [Reply]

  20. Tara says:

    We have a 11 month old boxer. She will excited pee when I come home or if people come over. How do I stop this?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    use the search bar at the top of the page and search for my article on submissive peeing

    [Reply]

  21. Joe Klein says:

    I am buying a Boston Terrier puppy. I will be crate training. Not sure what size crate to get. I would like to get one that the dog can use as a puppy and adult. Can you help me?

    Thanks
    Joe

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Get one that will be big enough for him/her to get up and turn around when full grown, but not HUGE or you will have potty training problems in the crate.

    [Reply]

  22. Mac Gay says:

    My son has a dog that is about 5 years old. He doesn’t pee or poop when they come to visit me- even if the dog spends the night- but he does poop in my son’s house sometimes if he leaves him outside his crate. I am retired so I was wondering if it would work if I went to his house and worked with the dog, using your training methods. Or does my son have to be the one to do it?

    I know that crate training is a good thing but the dog now has to stay in his crate over 8 hrs a day and then gets out for just a few minutes if my son has to leave to go somewhere else after he gets home from work.

    Thanks, Mac

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    you can work with the dog in his house. It is more about consistent environment when working on potty training.

    [Reply]

  23. Dolly says:

    My 5 month old coton de tulear was potty trained to go on a pee pad when I got her at 2 months old. She was 90 % perfect with an occasional accident when the pee pad wasn’t changed, she prefers to use a fresh pad . I made the mistake of letting her have the run of the house as she was so well potty trained. She has suddenly begun to potty next to the pee pad, or just wherever she wants to. She will actually sit next her puddle and look at me as if to say “look at this, you might want to clean this up” I will show dismay, remind her where to go, clean it up and put her in her pen. I have now begun to put her on leash in the house unless we are playing. She used to potty on comand, but not now–she can hold her potty for 8 or 9 hours. She refuses to use the pee pads in her kennel, waits until I take her out (on the leash) and finally goes when she realizes I am not going to play, but will put her back in the kennel until she goes. I praise her when she finally does go. I sure hope she goes back to being trained to go on the pads again. I hope I haven’t made an irreversible mistake in giving her so much freedom too soon and now taking her freedom away. I love my little one and want to be a really good mommy. She’s so smart she understands so much.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    This is why I hate and never use potty pads. Read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/indoor-potty-training/

    [Reply]

  24. Stephanie says:

    I have a year and a half old Prague Ratter female. I know I haven’t been super consistent with potty training, but I sort of feel like her personality is also resisting. I just don’t think she cares that I reward her for doing her business outside. I treat every time she does her #2 outside, but she will still go in the house. And regardless of food schedule consistency, her bathroom schedule is completely erratic. This is in contrast to my male (2.5 years) who will go in the morning and again either right before or right after dinner. She also doesn’t seem to be able to associate the word “potty” with doing her business irregardless of how many times say the word when she goes and how often I praise her. I know you aren’t a fan of potty pads, but she pees a thousand times a day. I have a walker to take them out mid-work day, but the pad will still have been used in the morning and in the afternoon before I get home. They aren’t confined to crates during the day, but rather in an area of the (daylight) basement. Do you think she needs to go through a strict crating routine to get her off the pads? Do you think she chooses not to hold it rather than being unable to hold it? Also, she will #2 sometime in the middle of the night. I thought about changing the feeding schedule to later in the evening (5pm to 8pm) so that she will go in the morning instead. They have a fenced yard. I also don’t take them for a walk every day (in the winter especially). Do you think exercise after dinner will help her schedule? My neighborhood is safe, but I’m always leery of walking in the dark. Sorry for this comment being all over the place!!

    [Reply]

  25. Lisa says:

    Hi Minette. We have an 11 week old pup that is locked in the bathroom at night and when I’m out at work. I take him out to wee last thing and first thing and if I wake in the night and need to wee myself! but toilet training is not going well. He still wees in the bathroom when locked in and around the house when not with no warning signs. Even when we are fully watching him! I have just bought a crate but I’m not sure how to use it as he has seemed to wee when he’s asleep! He is an indoor dog as we live in the bush and I’m scared a python will eat him but i want to train him to go outside. We have started using a bell but he has not learnt that outside is the place yet and he just likes playing with the bell…. Feeling a bit overwhelmed! Thanks, Lisa

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    He is just a baby, use the crate and follow him around.

    [Reply]

  26. Daniela Quinn says:

    Hello…. I need some suggestions. We rescued a 5 month old mix from the animal rescue here in Toronto. She’s an wonderful girl with a very docile temperament but….here it comes the but, she is learning the house routine with us working shift work and having to change schedules weekly. She “gets” it most of the times and sleeps through the night without a pee break. We know she can hold for at least 6 hours because she sleeps with us in our room for easy 8 hours. She has her bed beside ours and she stays there without any complaints. Now the problem we run into is when we leave her at home in her crate and go to work. We have had her now for 3 weeks and the most we have to leave her in the crate is about 4 hours where someone comes home to meet her. She goes in her crate during the day when we are at home and we find her there sleeping and happy. She likes the crate we have fed her there giving her new toys there and treats so her crate is a happy place until we leave the house. We always walk her before we leave and she always pees and poos before she is left in her crate but for some reason when we come home from a 3 – 4 hour she has poo in her crate and now she is covered with it and she is freaking out!!! We think she has anxiety and goes poo when left in the crate? Her crate is only big enough for her to stand up and turn around so I don’t understand why she goes poo there? She never pees is always poo?
    Any suggestions? We need to go to work and she has to be crated until she is trained. We have a 9 year old dog that stays home up to 10 hours and just sleeps. What can I do to help her stopping this poo business in the crate?
    Thank you;
    Daniela

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/dirty-puppy/

    [Reply]

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