Some People Call it Gross But Slobber Has it’s Benefits. Let’s Talk About it.

When you look up the definition of slobber in the dictionary you will see slobber: To let saliva or liquid spill out from the mouth and then you may see a picture of one of my dogs next to the definition.

Many people are completely grossed out by slobber and my question is why? It’s a normal occurrence in dogs, some are just more gifted at producing it than others.

Slobber is not going to hurt you. It may leave your pants a little wet, and if it dries on your wall it may be difficult to remove, but slobber is nothing to fear.

Your still not convinced are you?

Slobber can help you in the yard.

Tired of raking leafs?

Then just send your dog out to do it!

Slobber has great glue-like properties.

 Maybe slobber isn’t the proper word for you. Try one of these out instead:

  • Drool
  • Goober
  • Slime
  • Flooger-a long, stringy strand of dog saliva, often containing fur. Seen dripping from the corners of the mouth, flipped over the nose, adhering to the walls, ceiling or wiped on articles of human clothing. Size, often directly proportional to the size of the dog (St. Bernard/Newfoundland, etc.), may be a source of great pride.

Newfoundland owners use the term flooger often:

Whoa! Did you see the size of that flooger wrapped around his nose?!

 

Still afraid of it?

Alright, then I’ll share some of my slobber tips with you, just in case.

Slobber Tips

  • Run! Sooner or later a dog with a nice long slobber hanging from his mouth is going to shake his head
  • Always carry a slobber towel in your pocket. Then wipe as needed.
  • Don’t have a towel? Then use your shirt sleeve. Slobber washes right out.
  • Pinch and fling. Now this one takes some practice and the proper technique. Using your index finger and thumb, you need to pinch the slobber at the top, by the mouth, twist just a bit, and then fling. Be careful! Sometimes this can backfire and the slobber is stronger than you anticipated and winds up running down your arm.

 

See, it’s not all that bad. You just needed more information. I bet you feel better about slobber already.

So tell me, are you a slobber hater? Do you run and hide when you see a big long goober hanging from a dog’s mouth?

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Comments

  1. Benita says:

    Chloe and Travis are my major contributors to the slobber around her. Gracie (a.k.a. the Princess. among other names) doesn’t slobber too much (mainly outside (I guess it’s easier to hide it there). Just let Chloe or Travis think about food and the river gates open up. Chloe has learned that when I tell her to “move, you’re dripping” she will back up about 18 inches and let it rip. Travis? He’s just a slob and let’s things drip (or pour) as they will.

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    Jennifer Reply:

    That is great that Chloe knows what dripping means! Ha-ha!

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  2. Cheryl says:

    The easiest slobber I have encountered is the Slobbersicle! The frozen slobber is great for those who have issues with the wet and sticky. Friends and family express fewer screaming or panicing fits. Plus they’re a wonderful frozen treat for your Newfie.

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    Jennifer Reply:

    Slobbersicles are great! They make for an interesting night when you have company over!

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  3. Ginger Melchor says:

    Is it true slopper helps heal wounds on your body?

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    Minette Reply:

    No, dogs have plenty of bacteria in their mouths unless you are brushing their teeth every day. That old wives tale is a myth 🙂

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    Jennifer Reply:

    Thanks Minette!

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    Elizabeth Houser Reply:

    Sorry Minette I beg to differ. Several years ago a classmate of my son did a science project in which he grew bacteria in petri dishes and observed the effects of various antibiotic treatments on them they were well documented and he used such items as alcohol, Bacitracin, Neosporin, and Hydrogen Peroxide as well as dog drool. Dog drool was more effective than even Neosporin. Usually Old Wives tales become old because they are true. At the time and in the culture they develop they might not have the science to show why, but when they have repeatable results over generations they stick for good reason. Dog mouths do have bacteria but it’s the good kind that helps, another reason perhaps they have been a good friend to man over all this time.

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    Minette Reply:

    I’m still going to have to disagree as I have worked in the veterinary world and seen what a licking dog can do to a sore.

    I too did a study in college and saw what grew on the petri dish of a dog that licked it and lets just say I wouldn’t want that on a wound.

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  4. Jim says:

    I used to have a newfie named Max. Max was the king of slobber. He would usually have twin slobber from both sides of the mouth… as long as 10 inches or so.. one shake of his head and run for cover… I always thought it could be used for some type of industrial glue.

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    Jennifer Reply:

    Oh yes, the double shoe string slobber, one of my favorite types of slobber!
    Isn’t it amazing how well slobber sticks? I have thought about bottling it up and selling it!

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  5. Kirk says:

    My Whippet Dante grows this giant gob at the front of his mouth. It doesn’t hang or swing, it just gets bigger. I take him and the other three whippets, Jack, Zoe and Toby out for their daily run and after they tear up the field for 10 to 15 minutes straight, they go on the prowl. This is when this monster spit-ball starts growing. It can cover the whole front of his mouth, from the top lip to under his chin. It’s the grossest thing, and there is no way he’ll take a drink of water to wash it off. It’s like he’s showing it off.

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    Jennifer Reply:

    Ha-ha! Dante needs to learn how to fling that slobber, that would be a great way for him to show it off!

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  6. elaine says:

    I wish that my Havanese would slobber. He has a rare genetic ailment which limits his saliva production significantly. Therefore, he is prone to gum disease and rotting teeth. At the ripe old age of four, he had a dozen teeth removed…and will probably need more extractions in the next few years. Viva slobber!

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    Jennifer Reply:

    A dozen teeth removed at 4, oh boy. I am sorry to hear that your Havanese has so many dental issues.

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  7. Kelsie says:

    hahaha my dog gives me a big slobbery kiss as a way of saying ‘Hi! I really missed you in that 15 minutes while you were at the neighbours!’ He does it whenever I come home! And when he goes for a drink? he doesn’t wash it away…. IT GETS BIGGER!!!

    But atleast i know its a sign of love! 😀

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    Jennifer Reply:

    A big slobbery kiss is the best way to say hello!
    Don’t you just love it when it grows? Ha-ha!

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    Kelsie Reply:

    Hahaha my dog has learnt to put his face on my freshly washed jeans and in some GROSS situations then i am wearing SHORTS(AKA IT GOT ON MY LEG!):)
    My family calls it ‘Parking’ and it is digusting because it seems like every time he slobbers on me he goes and washes his face STRAIGHT AFTERWARDS! 😀

    But he is a sweetheart and i wouldn’t change him! 🙂

    Kelsie

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    Jennifer Reply:

    Isn’t that great when they use your pants as a towel?!
    Love the “parking” term!

  8. Mike says:

    I have always had Boston Terriers, Shelties, and Border Collies. I find them easy too train, clean, polite, and eager to please. I have never had a problem with slobber.I train with gentleness and affection and with over fifty years of experience I wonder why folks don’t try it more often.

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    Jennifer Reply:

    That is wonderful that your pets are easy to train Mike!

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    Teri Reply:

    I have an Aussie and she is a Dr. Jekyll / Mr. Hyde. I have tried every “gentle and affectionate way” way to train her. She is so headstrong!!!! She’s and Alpha Female and wants to be boss. She’ll growl and bite when she doesn’t want to do something, and she’d bitten my hands and ripped skin a number of times if I try to take something away from her that is bad or dangerous for her to chew, such as a metal twist tie or piece of wood, or plastic that she always seems to find. I’m at my wits end! I love the dog and want to train her to be social, but she is AWFUL around my grandkids or anyone who comes to visit. Should I put her down or what? She can be just as sweet and funny as she is vicious. I don’t have money for a professional trainer as I am 75 and only on social security. My husband died and then my last Aussie, who was the best dog, ever! I need the companionship and love of a dog, but how do I calm this one down?

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    Lynda Reply:

    I too have a Dr. Jekyll/Mr Hyde cooker/lab female 4 yrs old. Would like to hear others advise/opions please

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  9. Marc Peron says:

    That was a very well written little article . I enjoyed it. But why do you think I have four dogs, all with clean tight lips and no frool. No I didn’t miss spell that I was trying to invent a new word just to glorify that one particular ability that a few of our fine friends have ( FROOL )!

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    Jennifer Reply:

    Thank you for the compliment on the article Marc.
    I am supposing the reason you have 4 tight lip dogs is the same reason I have 2 loose lipped dogs:)

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  10. I think it gross beyond gross. When I brush my teeth and spit a drool hangs it grosses me out! soooo What more can I say. I will NEVER have one of the big droolers. I tried to watch that comedy with the big drooler dog – yeah- I couldn’t it made me fee like upchucking, seriously. Who knows why.

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    Jennifer Reply:

    Slobber isn’t for everyone, I must agree with that! My husband is not a fan at all of the spit that my dogs display so proudly!

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  11. Maureen Troukis says:

    Hi, my Bitsey was the master of slober! Two shoe strings were always hanging down and when she shook her head ;it would always land in my hair.I loved every bit of my Bitsey and would very shyly pull it out of my hair and go on with the day! I always felt safe when Bitsey was here slobber and all!

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    Jennifer Reply:

    Hi Maureen,

    The shoestrings is an amazing site isn’t it?
    I have had my fair share of slobber in my hair too! It makes a great hair gel!

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  12. Elizabeth says:

    One of the reasons I prefer clean lipped dogs is I hate the sight of slobber. Shouldn’t have read this, it was disgusting.

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    Jennifer Reply:

    Slobber is the same as spit, just a little thicker. Thanks for reading Elizabeth!

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  13. Laurie says:

    My daughter sent me the link to your article. How funny. Gus is a big drooler. He’s our 4th Newf. Our others didn’t drool like he does. In fact, our Landseers never drooled, they just dripped after drinking and our black one drooled once in a while, but very little. She was a little more dainty. Gus, though, always seems to be dripping and since he likes to spend time under the porch, his drool is quite often muddy. He doesn’t seem to like to be this way, so one of his favorite greetings is wiping his face on my jeans. He feels so much better after that! My daughter’s Newf doesn’t drool much, but he drips a lot after drinking. Quite messy. When she sent me this link, she said the photo of your dog is what a cross between her dog and mine would look like. She’s right. She has a brown Newf with poofy fur and mine is black with longer fur.

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    Jennifer Reply:

    Hi Laurie,
    I am glad your daughter sent you this way!
    Gus sounds like my Sherman, he is a huge drooler and quite often is a muddy drooler because he likes to dig in the mud!! My first Newf, who was a landseer was a moderate drooler and my other brown Newf Leroy is a mild drooler!
    Thanks so much for stopping by and be sure to tell your daughter the same! It’s always great to meet fellow Newfie owners!

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  14. Mary says:

    My English Setter, Rocky, was a great slobberer. It was on the walls, my low ceilings, my clothes, my friends clothes , the car and any place else he was. I carried a microfiber cloth every where and he wore s bandana justbin case I didn’t have s cloth handy. I miss it!

    [Reply]

    Jennifer Reply:

    Hi Mary!
    We have towels in every room of our house just in case, and when we go out in public I always have a slobber towel in my pocket. One can never be too prepared when it comes to slobber!

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  15. Shanna says:

    Love the article! I have a 3 year old St. Bernard named Antanov, he’s a double shoe string drooler. He’s learned that if he’s in the kitchen he can’t shake his head! My husband says the drool is the one thing he doesn’t like about him, but I don’t mind at all!

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    Jennifer Reply:

    That is a great trick Shanna! I must teach my dogs not to shake in the kitchen!

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  16. Lyn says:

    My Great Pyrenees, Cannon, is a champion drooler. He has what GP folks call “loose lips.” He’s good at all the tricks you descrtibe – wrap around the nose, shake it on the walls, etc. I just say his motto is Truly Drooly 🙂

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    Jennifer Reply:

    Ha-ha truly Drooly! Love it!
    Thanks for sharing about Cannon Lyn!

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  17. Linda says:

    I’m so glad my Max is a shitsu with very little slobber. The most he does is lick my neck most every night before we go to sleep. My husband is grossed out by that, but he’s getting used to it. No slobbery dogs for me, sorry.

    [Reply]

    Jennifer Reply:

    No need to apologize!
    It has taken my husband 5 years to get use to slobber and my children are still working on it:)

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  18. Kara says:

    Haha I loved this article…. As a breeder and the proud owner of 6 adult St Bernards I was pleasantly surprised to read that I am not the inventor of the Pinch-and-Fling method of getting rid of slobbers lol….. Drool is something that comes with the territory, something you get used to and even come to appreciate as it means that your dog, at some point since you changed your clothes, has felt the overwhelming need to come and show you how much you are loved!

    [Reply]

    Jennifer Reply:

    Thanks Kara!
    I am so glad to know that I am not the only one who does the pinch and fling method and appreciates the drool!

    [Reply]

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