Effects Of Training In The Dog’s Brain

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Comments

  1. Karen S. says:

    I’m a first time owner of an inside dog. This is actually my 2nd german shepard. We got her when she was 3 months old. She is now almost 6 months old. We tried using puppy pads as an intermediate when we couldn’t take her out. That was successful but got quite messy. I knew that she was growing at a rapid rate and didn’t want to invest the money into a bunch of crates. So 13 days ago I got her a crate and it was a success. We were taking her outside as soon as we got home. She wasn’t using the bathroom anymore and thing were great… until yesterday. She had used the bathroom in her crate. I figured it was that we didn’t stay out with her long enough so last night I made sure she used the bathroom in both ways before I brought her back in for sleepytime. This morning I woke up and the same thing. She had used the bathroom in her crate again. Unsure of what to do I’m guessing that I need to set my alarm thru the night to take her outside every 2 hours. Please let me know if this is the correct measure or too extreme. I need advice please.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I definitely agree with the crate! It will make your life much easier!

    At 6 months old she should be able to hold her bladder. I am not sure whether she is peeing or pooping in there. She needs to learn what the crate is for and yes, you may have to back up a bit in your training regiment.

    Because of the puppy pads she has never really grasped the concept of going outside to pee and poop, she is use to doing it inside and may be confused.

    Take up water and food several hours before bed. I don’t feed after 5 if at all possible, and go out with her to get use to HOW much she is peeing and pooping so you have an idea of what is normal.

    I recommend putting the crate next to your bed at night so if she gets restless you can hear her and get her outside. Also sometimes puppies get sick tummies and have diarrhea so this gives you the opportunity to get her out before she has an accident.

    Good luck and keep working hard! 🙂

    [Reply]

    russ Reply:

    karen.s ;the rule of thumb for puppies and their bladders or bathroom breaks are,1 month old they can hold it for 1 hour and two months old two hours 3 months old three hours ect.when you do bring them outside to their designated spot to pee or poop.if they pee,say good (name) for peeing,way to go,and use this everytime,soon all you’ll have to say is,need to pee,and they go to the door and wait..repetition is the key and praise.from a dog owner that has used chet’s ways from day one…

    [Reply]

    Colleen Reply:

    I agree with Minette in regard to her ability to hold it, she won’t because she’s never needed to before. The thing about crate training successfully is the crate can’t be too big. If she has enough room to divide herself away from the messes she makes she will become comfortable with it near her. Being a german Shepard, I would assume she has a larger cage. If the cage is overly expansive for her, try to make it smaller using a baby gate and some zip tiesto hold it in place. My larger crate came with a divider to alter the size as the puppy grew. Do take up water several hours before so you can learn your dogs habits and ease training. This should not have to be a permanent routine but for now it will help you and your dog. The crate next to the bed could be good or bad, depending on how your dog adjusts to the crate. you could be looking at some sleepless nights.

    [Reply]

  2. mike says:

    poster needs to be bigger, I cannot read it because of the small print

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Click on it and it should get bigger

    [Reply]

    Mitzi Reply:

    I clicked on it and it got smaller

    [Reply]

    Colleen Reply:

    use the link above the graphic and then a new web page will appear. That page has the ability to zoom in or out to suit your needs

    russ Reply:

    click on tool tab,right top corner,then click zoom,to your specific needs…

    Terasa Wicks Reply:

    I will link the Effects Of Training In The Dog’s Brain to my website, I am a Dog-trainer and psychologist in the Uk.

    [Reply]

    Joan W Reply:

    @Minette
    Thanks for your suggestion to make it easier to read. I clicked ans it downloaded it beautifully!
    Then I was able to see that your feature dog is a Malinois… familiar breed as my daughter breeds Belgies!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    😉 I have 2 myself and a Dutchie 🙂

    [Reply]

  3. Susan Freiman says:

    Perhaps the crate is too big. There are crates with an interior partition that can be mov4ed to increase and decrease the size according to the dog.

    [Reply]

    Heather Stevens Reply:

    If your crate doesn’t have an interior partition, don’t worry. Ours didn’t have one and we just cut a piece of plywood to fit and braced it with a 2×4. We just cut the 2×4 down as our puppy grew and eventually removed the plywood all together. Worked like a dream. As others have stated, you will need to back up in your training, basically starting from scratch. Good luck and be patient.

    [Reply]

  4. Glenn says:

    I have NEVER had a more hardheaded dog in my life than the German Shepherd I just got rid of. From the time he was seven weeks old, he did just what he wanted to and you could not break him or change his mind. He did walk very well on a leash and sit on command, but he was a hellian@

    [Reply]

    sara Reply:

    Glenn, sounds like you have no tolerance. I have a border collie, you want stubborn, you haven’t met stubborn till you’ve had a bc. I purchased her from a breeder at 7/8weeks, after ‘puppy training’, small crate, large crate, outdoor run, now, finally after 7weeks training with a certified master trainer…she is wonderful!..many times I would have thrown in the towel, but I chose her and she is my responsibility. You have given your ‘problem’ to someone else, hardly fair to the dog. Like people every dog even though its the same breed are different.

    oh yes, chewed all the baseboards in the house, an antique dresser, leg off chair, shoes, socks..etc etc.

    Wouldn’t change her for the world. She’s not perfect but if I wanted perfect I would have chosen a statue of a dog and have it sit in the corner.

    btw I had a border collie for 15yrs and she was as close to perfect as you can get.

    hopefully you don’t rush out and get another pet…to hand off when the times are rough.

    [Reply]

    Deborah Reply:

    LOL, thank you for saying what you did regarding this person throwing away her pet just because it acted up or failed to live up to her so called expectations. People like that should not be allowed have any pets. They seem to be looking for that perfect acting well behaved pet and hey, I feel that person is just one type of person who just see’s a darn animal and not a family member. Wonder if shes had any children that failed to behave and she threw away? Just curious!

    [Reply]

    Mary Reply:

    Wow….. you got “rid” of your dog. Dogs are like children…..you don’t always know how they’ll turn out, but you make that lifelong commitment BEFORE you bring them home. I feel sorry for your dog. I’m sure he loved you very much anyway.

    [Reply]

    D Wright downs Reply:

    Perhaps the GSD Glenn had was more high drive than any he had had before. I grew up w/GSDs and had them with me as i traveled the world in the Army. I trained my own Service Dog. I have one now that is SUPER HIGH Drive/hard for me to reach. When one of the owners of one of his 12 half sibs began to mentor me, it fell into place. Not all german Shepherd dogs are the same. My guy is from a working class of dog. He is imported because I don’t like American GSD’s who are often in-bred and have no butt and rotton hips. I want a lot of German in the dog. I have been very lucky. Being ill I didn’t trust my judgement. Most of his half sibs are Cadaver, SAR, and Schutzhund. He is, to my knowledge, the only high drive/prey Service Dog. he is super smart, has not a fear in the world, is loyal, you name it. He just needs a different type of training by dog trainers not PET TRAINERS. There is a difference. Not a one size fits all breed. fortunately, I had the resources to help me with this. I have the love for the dog to pursue what it takes, ill or not.

    [Reply]

    Liam Coonan Reply:

    You must be a complete nutter. The shorthair is the most wonderful obedient dog.

    [Reply]

    Deb Reply:

    Hard-headed? Try a Jack Russell Terrier. Oh they are perfect, as long as they get what they want, when they want it. Training? If he feels like it, he coud be a poster child for dog training, if he doesn’t, you might as well go talk to a stump.

    [Reply]

    Doreen Reply:

    I have a fox terrier – with exactly the same attitude as your Jack Russell. I want to teach her “No Bark” “No Jump on People” Don’t harrass the cat”.

    Any suggestions?

    [Reply]

    Deb Reply:

    My Jack Russell (Harley) is now 9 years old. Hasn’t changed one bit. I just learned to live with it. His “brother” (Golden Ret/Aust Shep mix)is only a year and a half old and listens perfectly. Used a lot of Chet’s methods. Harley is a good dog, just stubborn. They tell you when you are looking to get a Jack Russell or any of the other related terriers, to make sure you know what you are getting into. The only way I got him to stop jumping on people was to get a shock collar. Don’t get upset, this collar also has a button that only beeps. the beep works perfectly when people come over. So well that I haven’t even had to turn on the collar for years. Just slip it on his neck. Instant gentleman.

    Natalie Reply:

    Got rid of your dog? Get a cat next time. GSDs are not for everyone. Why did you get him in the first place??

    [Reply]

    Joanne Reply:

    Get a Cat?????????????/ Why????? when they got rid of the dog. No this is not the answer. The only answer there is, is don’t get a pet. If you don’t have the patience to train and work with your animal then you don’t need one.

    [Reply]

  5. Eileen says:

    I’m wondering if the dogs that are on the hardest dogs to train list are there because they aren’t as food motivated as the dogs on the Easiest to train list. For example, the beagle. Wouldn’t that dog rather sniff or track for a reward than be fed a treat?

    I am also surprised that the Jack Russell terrier isn’t on either list. Very nice poster. Thanks for letting us post on our own blogs.

    [Reply]

  6. Teresa Hunt says:

    I have a German Sheperd which I got at 4 months old. She was not socialized at all. She was potty trained outside in 3 days. I used clicker and treats. She has messed in her crate but it was due to seperation anxiety and a possible dairy intolerence. She is always thinking and could be one step ahead of me if I am too slow on my feet. Sheperds are not for the lazy owner or faint of heart. They require a LOT of exercise and good attention and they will reward you with the best loyality and companionship you will ever find. I love my German Sheperd.

    [Reply]

  7. Carolyn says:

    Eileen you are so correct. My Beagle is very easy to train. I have to stop her from going through all her tricks without any command. She learns them all very quickly. Her motivation is love, hugs and complements She is beautiful(magazine markings) a full sized beagle but runt(17- 18 lbs),& very loving (never meets a stranger)She is a show stopper Her interest in food is very low. She will leave any food for a walk, play with tug toys, etc. She does tricks because she loves to please.

    [Reply]

  8. Anne says:

    I have had the great pleasure to have several Border Collies in my life. They are extremely active, but if kept motivated and worked mentally and physically, they are wonderful. I would suspect GSD are the same.
    I adopted my new Border at 3 months. He came from a workig farm (cattle and geese) and came to live in suburba. Inside of a week he was housebroken – making only 2 peepee mistakes. Of course, initially it is hard work . I was up through the night -can’t expect a puppy to hold it all night. But it was worth the effort. He was not crated either. I grew up with numerous dogs, prior crating and have really never used them, unless their was a surgery where they had to stay quiet.
    Friends of mine have GSD and they are amazing.
    I believe that the smartest can often be the most challenging because they are so smart that one needs to stay on top of it.
    Our dogs get only positive reinforcement and it works for us.
    I also think people give up too soon. We have had a couple of rescue borders. People can really mess these dogs up. If there is a major problem, go to a trainer that you believe in and work , work , work. The end will be so rewarding.

    [Reply]

  9. Larissa says:

    I totally disagree with the border Collie being so easy to train, they are so smart, they want to do it another way! Australian Cattle dogs are easier, and love to please

    [Reply]

    Anne Reply:

    Yes, Borders do like to be independent thinkers. When I took my one border to a herding instinct test I was told by the judge not to do too much obedience if I was interested in herding! because there were many times borders need to make decicions on what to do with the sheep. There instinct of where te sheep are going and what the sheep will do is by far superior to ours.

    [Reply]

  10. Audrey says:

    I have a 6month old puppy who sleeps in a crate at night. She cannot hold for more than 4 or 5 hours so I get up once a night and walk her. She goes to the bathroom both ways every time. For me this confirms that she is not ready to spend long periods of time in the crate. At 6months your German Shepherd should be able to hold more that 2 hours but I do agree with getting up once in the middle of the night and walking him but put him right back in the crate and don’t play with him at all. You don’t want him to think 4am is puppy play time 🙂

    [Reply]

  11. Liz says:

    Seriously, spin is supposed to be hard to train? I always thought of that as a beginning trick. It is simple to start with a lure and transition the lure to a hand signal. My labs however are much to skittish to roll over all the way.

    [Reply]

  12. nancy keenan says:

    have had dogs all my life,my standard poodles learn VERY quickly!! had a heinz 57 a few years ago and she was very smart but they thought she was poodle/terrier mix. the poodles know a lot of words which i think is a real trait of theirs,and of border collies.

    [Reply]

  13. Nadira Ali says:

    I have a German Sheppard (Skippy) who is 10 months old, and already so big. He chews on my Palm Trees that I have in large flower pots. I try talking to him to stop eating up my plants, but it is still happening. What can I do to stop him from doing do.

    Also, when I am playing with him, he would try to bite me, but in a way not to hurt me. He would grab at my hand. What training can I give him to stop snapping at me.

    Thank You
    Nadira

    [Reply]

    jeanine Reply:

    our eight month germans shepherd is very dominant and destructive. just now he pulled my lily pily out of the ground. it had hard wire around it and two brickes and rockes with rope holding it down. when your dogs bites always say uhh and put it in time out. if its somewhere he doesnt like being. We put ours outside for fifteen minutes. dont get mad, remain calm. I heard it can be around the age of fifteen months when they start to settle down. The mouthing should stop by then. We just have make sure he knows we are the leader and he will one day be a lovely dog.

    [Reply]

  14. Olivia says:

    How do i teach my dog to roll over?????

    [Reply]

  15. joe says:

    my German Sheperd chewed wood trim, scatched doors and walls, but with patients
    and postive praise he has discontinue that behavior. At 18 months and 102lbs later he’s a great dog and wouldn’t give him up for anything.

    [Reply]

  16. Whyn says:

    Next tim you make a poster, spend some time learning which fonts are eaiser to read… then use them.

    You might also consider a brochure instead of a poster… something more easy to handle and reference.

    Posters are for a doctor’s office… not the internet.

    [Reply]

  17. Sylvia says:

    I bought a 3 1/2 mth golden retriever as when I wasleaving the shop my grandson cried. Anyway I knew that it was going to take me 3 weeks to train him, so I put my focus on getting him trained and never training a dog before I was not sure how I was going to do it. What I did, I fed him 3 times a day 7am 1pm and 5pm, and 20 minutes after meals took him out with treats in my pocket and 2 words go pee or go poo. It was the hardest 4 days as no sooner did I bring him in than an hour later he would be playful and guess what, but I had a mop and bucket with some bleach to clean up, but my dog started to realize that when he was out and did it, in one spot, he would get treats and if he did it inside he would get a telling off, so he started to compare, and wella 5 days later I have never looked back, now he barks or grabs my hand if I am on the computer to take him out, I don’t even feed the treats anymore but give him hugs. He is now 5 1/2 months and does not leave my side and I and my family are really enjoying him, the hard work was worth it, but you have to be consistent, no matter how tired you are and see it through as they are like children/babies, they don’t know any better as their bladders have to get stronger.
    Thank you,
    Sylvia

    [Reply]

  18. Linda says:

    I am actually very glad that Glenn found a new home for his GSD pup before he broke his spirit! Owner inconsistency is the number one cause for a “stubborn puppy”. He was probably totally confused as to what Glenn wanted him to do and therefore stopped trying and rather did nothing. If you sometimes call the puppy to play with him and at other times call the puppy to punish him for something he did and push his face into the poo or the torn up couch or whatever….puppy won’t know how to react and won’t know what the punishment was for. Puppies learn through the IMMEDIATE consequence of their actions. You therefore have ONE SECOND to either reward or punish. If puppy used the toilet in the house and you call him to punish him…. he actually thinks that you are punishing him for coming to you as that was the behaviour he offered immediately before he was punished…. that is why punishment should NEVER be used in training a pup acceptable behaviour!

    Hopefully the puppy was placed in a home with better owner leadership skills so that puppy have a good routine and tons of love and will grow up too be a fantastic adult GSD.

    It is so very important to do proper research on the breed you want to adopt so that you know if it will be suited to your personality and lifestyle.

    From all the comments above it is absolutely clear that each person is different and would therefore understand the different breeds suited to them better. It takes years of working with as many different breeds as possible to be able to feel equally comfortable in training a Labrador Retriever, Boxer, Scottish Terrier, Pit-bull, German Shepherd, Malamute, Yorkshire Terrier, etc.

    With Christmas just around the corner; please think twice before just giving a puppy or kitten as a Christmas gift – the person may not have the time or patience to train the puppy or kitten and his / her personality may not suit the temperament of the pet received…

    Thanks
    Linda

    [Reply]

  19. lizzy says:

    I have a sweet little miniature doberman pincher, and she’s never hurt a thing, but she barks…. alot. She sometimes barks randomely, and other times she’s barking at another dog or person. Whenever the doorbell rings or someone knocks on the door, she barks. I’ve tried introducing her to every new thing and having that thing reward her somehow, but she’s obbsessed with protecting, me and her territory. Im not sure what to do. getting mad never works, and if i act nice, i’m afrid she’ll think i’m rewarding her.

    [Reply]

  20. libby says:

    i don’t get it

    [Reply]

  21. Carol Mulder says:

    Thank you so veru much for the VERY HLPFUL tips that come through.
    Sorry to say some I cannot folloe as I hAVE THREE DOGS, but slowly we are maKING MANY Adjustments.
    Thanks
    Carol

    [Reply]

  22. vanessa says:

    Hi, I have an Africanis, 1 year old now. He is absolutely magnificent. However, I have a major problem with displacement aggression. When aresholes walk past our hse, their dogs running all over the place, he cannot get hold of them so goes for my jack russel standing next to me. Don’t know what to do.
    I do walk him every day, goes to training, talk to him all the time. But at my wits end. It is fine when i am home, but when i go to work, there is no one here to make sure he doesn’t hurt her.
    Regrds Vanessa

    [Reply]

  23. debora north says:

    i have a blue heler. very hard headed. been doing ur training but it dosnt always work with him. having a hard time with it all.

    [Reply]

  24. Marsha says:

    All internet search engines and/or operating systems give you many options for changing the fonts. On my laptop, I just place two fingers on my touchpad and move them apart. Touch screens do the same. Look for the options!

    [Reply]

  25. Norma says:

    I have always used either praise or food rewards in training my dogs. Rarely had a problem. Then I got a high content wolf-dog. She was also the alpha pup in her litter. Dad was pure wolf and mom one-half wolf. The only method of training for her was Cesar Milan’s way – using pack mentality. I didn’t have to be abusive, but I did have to have absolute authority over her or she would have run me down. She is 5 yrs. old now and an absolute joy. Her manners are perfect. If she “strays” all I have to do now is use the “NOW” command and she’s right back in line. She’s still a wolf and exhibits wolf tendancies, but the good ones. If I hadn’t seen the Milan show, I would probably have had to give her away. This method would not have worked for my other dogs, too aggressive, but I’m really glad I watched the Dog Whisperer for her sake.

    Upshot? Both methods work. However, for me, the Milan way is only for wolf, or high content wolf-dogs who only understand the “pack mentality.”

    [Reply]

    Sara Reply:

    You must remember…she is a ‘wolf’.

    [Reply]

  26. Jean says:

    I have 2 hybrid dogs, Shi-Poo’s, and they are both house dogs and trained to use pottie pads. As they are growing up, I find that is not the greatest way to handle this job! I can’t let them go outdoors as we have problems with eagles, racoons and cyotes. Where can I find a “crate” as mentioned in several of your customer views and replies.

    Also, the above chart and information is great, but I can’t print it. Why? I purchased your “dog training”, but did not receive CD’s as I had hoped. I downloaded the information, but can’t get it to print out. Any solution? I am not that “technically” computer-wise at age 80, but am learning! Thanks.

    [Reply]

    Abby2660 Reply:

    Go to http://www.drsfostersmith.com to find the right size crate. Don’t buy too big, but look for appropriate size so dog can easily stand, not too much longer than dog, and only wide enough for dog to turn around. You should be able to find a small crate to fit perfectly. I prefer the wire kind, where the dog gets plenty of air & can see out from every angle, vs the closed in plastic crates, but then I’ve had more medium to large dogs than tiny ones.

    You could take your dogs outside, but ONLY on a leash attached to a halter, vs collar. I know you have to be more careful w/the necks of the smaller dogs, not to pull on the neck, therefore, a halter is a safer option. Especially, if you may have to scoop them up in a hurry. You could take each dog out separately, so you only have one to pick up, in case an eagle flies by. Get them used to the leash in the house, by letting them just drag it around behind them. You might even consider a cat leash, as they are so much lighter weight, for your little dogs. I’ve house trained all my dogs on a leash, otherwise, they (at first) might think they’re going outside to play, and “this trip” is specifically for bathroom time. Pick a word or two, like go pee pee or go potty (#2), and stick with that phrase each time. I’ve never used a treat for outside potty, just tons of excited praise. It doesn’t take them long to figure this out.

    [Reply]

  27. Abby2660 says:

    In the case of those of you who have had problems with dogs chewing things, you need to use McNasty. It is the most foul tasting/smelling stuff you can imagine. There are quite a few websites that carry it, so shop around, as it can range from $22.95/32oz bottle (cheapest) to $30+!. Some websites will be horse/equine websites, as this is used a LOT to stop horses who crib (chew wood stalls/fences). It is non-toxic, & will not burn skin or irritate, unless you get it in your eyes, & it WILL sting. Since it is oil based, you will have to wash your hands with rubbing alcohol, because soap & water is not sufficient.

    I have a sister who had to replace a sofa & dining room set, before she finally broke down & bought the McNasty. She tried Bitter Apple, & other bitter/spicy deterrents, none of which stopped the dog. After using the McNasty, she confessed she WISHED she had listened to me sooner. The expense of the McNasty is SO much cheaper than her furniture, woodwork, etc. The smell is VERY strong, but once it dries, YOU can no longer smell it, but your dog can definitely still smell it! I’ve even used it outside for plants, ropes, tarps, anything you don’t want chewed. Once they have tasted/smelled it, they will walk up to something, smell it, & walk away!!

    We actually had our horse vet suggest it, for the cribbing, and when that worked, I thought, I bet this would stop a dog from chewing, too. Why wait to say, when all else fails? Good luck!!

    [Reply]

  28. Sarah says:

    I got a 4 month old rescue Border Collie Jack Russell cross. He’s now 2 but up until he was 6 months old I felt like giving up too. He was so destructive and wilful. This $200 dog cost me over $7000 in 6 months with his destructive ways. He learnt how to get into my closet and chewed up all my shoes, including my brand new $400 stilletos. I sat down and cried, I held the dog and talked to him like a child, trying to explain why he had to go, he made a howling sound to match my crying and just looked at me with such intelligence, like he really understood. He never chewed a single shoe from that day. Everytime he did something wrong I just sat down, held him in my arms and talked to him, explaining why it was wrong and he didn’t do it again. Now he’s a perfect little gentleman, sweet and gentle and full of fun, he does anything I tell him if I just talk to him like he’s a little child. Is this possible? Are there really dogs who can understand you without talking to them in ‘dog language’? or do I just have a magical dog?

    [Reply]

  29. Mary t says:

    We have schnauzar puppy…Dico is his name…he gets to nipping us a lot …and frantic hoping jumping nipping at the same time while near our heals at times…is it a good idea to put him on the leash to stop this…he holds leash in his mouth…so worried he will bite someone…what can we do…he did bite me after nipping thing was going on…now I yell at him…or is that wrong…I am getting tired…his mom and dad live next door my neighbors don’t repremand dogs at all…they say puppy mom will out grow it…makes me mad because all my work gets undone every time my dog their son…goes by the house even if they are not at home…mom is cute but shows teeth at me all the time…

    [Reply]

    misandi Reply:

    I bought my first Mini Schnauzer puppy a few months ago. She is now 11 mos. She did the nipping thing also. I read somewhere that if you clap your hands that will get their attention then you can put your hand up flat in front of their face. Say ‘NO’. As in all training this must be repatiously done.
    Hope this is helpful.

    Sandi

    [Reply]

  30. Dave says:

    I adopted one of these German Shepherds years ago from a neighbor who said he was untrainable. One of the best and most obedient dogs I’ve ever had !! His name was Apollo. The previous owner said he belonged on the moon.

    [Reply]

  31. Wilhemina says:

    I got a white swiss german shepherd who has been scratching all my doors and i dont know what to do anymore. Time and money i dont have. He’s my angel and just love him to bits. I got him from a neighbor two years ago and then i could afford obedience classes. Now things has changed.
    Could some one please tell me what to do in order for him not to scratch my class doors.

    [Reply]

  32. MARGARET says:

    Thanks very interestind stuff.

    [Reply]

  33. Ravzie says:

    Sorry to be picky, but a dog training pro should know the word is HEEL not heal…makes me lose a little respect.

    [Reply]

  34. nikhil says:

    i dont know how to potty train my old dog and im 11 years old

    [Reply]

  35. My dog sleeps with us every night. Her name is Lilly and she is very smart.
    She is a new breed (Havanese) made in Havana. She is very smart.

    When she needs to go out wheather day or night she will come to you and let you know that she needs to go.

    At night she will lick my ear to wake me up. I take her out in the back yard and stand there until she is finished. I give her a treet each time. She leads me back into the house to where the treets are. I give her a treet and we both return to bed at night or to the Park during the day time.

    The breed is Havananese. The most smartest dog I have ever had.
    This dog and I go for walks about four times a day.
    This is the smartest I have ever had and I have had several.
    Pat

    [Reply]

  36. Malinda says:

    I’m trying to train my Grand Daughter’s 1 1/2 yr old Schitzu/Maltese who is a biter and is very aggressive around anyone other then my grand daughter and myself. I’ve taken him to beginner and intermediate lessons at Petsmart and he passed with flying colors. No one could handle him but me though.
    At family gatherings he will bite anyone who comes to the door or as family members who already gave him a treat and he now ignores but will bit if they reach for him my rand daughter or me. At the last family gathering he bit a neighbor who came to visit and my son my grand daughters father kicked him and we had to tether him next or mgd or myself. I’m now trying to find help with other dog whisperers, but this one seams mean with restraints. is there anything else I can do. And no he wasn’t on a leash or with a muzzle at any family gatherings.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    At the very least he needs to be on a leash and controlled by you. His ability to be aggressive needs to be taken away from him and the fact that he was kicked only reassures his feelings that he doesn’t like people. When he has trauma like this is will be much more difficult to change his mind, so this should be avoided at all cost.

    He needs to be taught how to act and react and be controlled at all times, if you cannot devote that time to him he should be crated.

    Read this article http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/time-seek-professional-dog-training-aggression/
    http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/dogs-control-owners-relationships/
    and then go back and search from more articles on aggression in the search box they will give you more assistance.

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  37. Louise says:

    My last three dogs were barkers when I rescued them. All I did was say Every time…. No barking or your in the house ( if they were outside) and bring them in the house and put in the kennel for time out…and when in the house No barking or you’re in the kennel. And now when I walk my Boxer ( fear/leash aggression, towards all people and dogs)…who would bark at all people and other dogs, I would make him sit and repeat no barking and wait, while people and other dogs pass. Success. Good luck. Never hurt the animal…just lots of form patience

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  38. Mark says:

    starting when the dog is young , I have tied a bell onto the door know, and they ring it to go out (4) dogs have learned this from a teacup poodle to a bull mastiff.

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  39. Margene says:

    It’s the info that’s important.

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  40. Beverly Bonne says:

    We rescued a Terrier from a kill shelter. It had been starved beaten and had kennel cough and used as pit bull bate. He was only 27lbs and now is 42lbs. He is a standard terrier. He was never house broken and is about 1+ years old. We love him despite his destructive tendencies which I know is our fault do to my inability to tire him out due io handicap. He is very smart but this housebreaking thing keeps me busy all the time. Have you any tips on how to housebreaking a Terrier; I have been told Terriers are not wired the same as other dogs.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    all dogs are wired the same.

    There are many potty training articles… you can use the search bar at the top of the page to find more

    [Reply]

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