It Is Easier to Just Clean It Up; Another Look at Potty Training

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potty training yorkie puppies, house training a pomeranian puppy, dog potty training tips

Thanks Talent Hounds for the Photo

I tend to write about life experiences, ha ha. I guess that is how we all learn. And, I don’t always have a scheduled plan about what I am going to write about from week to week.

So I’ve mentioned it before and I will undoubtedly continue to mention it 😉 my bestest friends have just recently gotten a Yellow Labrador Retriever puppy for their family.

They wanted my Fury, but I keep telling them we are a “package” deal and I am not sure they are up for the “me” part of that package!

They had had him for about 5 days before my last visit (I try and visit about once a month because I steal and love their children).

We were briefly discussing potty training when mom mentioned that the kids thought “it is easier to clean up a mess” than to get the puppy out and keep it from happening.

I guess I had never had anyone say that to me before.

potty training yorkie puppies, house training a pomeranian puppy, dog potty training tips

Thanks Paw Luxury for the Photo

Just a little background on me, I am a little bit OCD when it comes to cleanliness. Don’t get me wrong you wouldn’t want to lick my floors but I need to shower twice a day and keep things as clean as possible.

The TV Show Hoarding can just about put me into a creepy tail spin. Want me to clean your house… invite me over and put “Hoarders” on the TV.

So I have never even had the thought cross my mind that letting the dog pee and poop in the house would be easier than just taking the time to get him/her outside.

I Bet They Aren’t the Only Ones

Now I can see where a 7 and 8 year old kid might think this; but I also got to thinking that I bet they are not the only ones!

I would guesstimate that this is a similar thought process for people with little or small dogs.

You see it is hard to ignore the turd of a Great Dane steaming in the middle of the living room floor; but it’s easier to ignore if you have a Yorkie that goes behind the sofa or even out in the middle of the room.

I once worked with a lady with Shih Tzu’s and she didn’t mind just picking up their poop.  Sometimes they went on their potty pads, but most of the time they did not; she just traveled behind them picked it up and flushed it.

The Smell

potty training yorkie puppies, house training a pomeranian puppy, dog potty training tips

Thanks 2mrealty for the photo. Too Bad We Can’t Teach This!

So as with any new puppy my friends wanted to do the best thing possible and feed it the best possible dog food and get it started off on the right paw.

I am not going to name brand names only to say that recently this dog food has come under fire for its ingredients. And, like his wife says, the husband was drawn to the bag because it was the prettiest shiniest blue bag they could find.

It touted high protein and natural ingredients along with being grain free. Let’s just say it would not have been my choice.

But beyond all of that was the most severe and disgusting smell associated with the puppy’s poop that I have ever smelled.

Don’t get me wrong, no puppy poop smells like roses; but this was just rank, rank, rank and extremely loose and difficult to clean up.

The second after the puppy sneaked off to poop; you KNEW by the lingering smell it was somewhere to be found.

The Problem

The problem is, not just the horrid smell, the problem is that the puppy is also leaning it is easier to sneak off for a minute and poop rather than go to a door or do a little dance or hang out on a leash.

They were imprinting this puppy to poop in his house and that it was easy and perfectly acceptable. What else would he expect? He doesn’t come with radar or a conscience that tells him not to!

And the longer the habit persists the harder the habit will be to break! It becomes what he first learns is right and THAT my friends is very hard to change.

The Day After I Got There

potty training yorkie puppies, house training a pomeranian puppy, dog potty training tips

Thanks Vet Street for the Photo

They had been keeping the puppy downstairs in the kitchen away from the upstairs bedrooms; this made it hard if not impossible for them to hear him when he first stirred.

Since I sleep on the sofa (it is much more comfortable than it sounds) I could hear him immediately and get him out BEFORE he screamed. He went from screaming several times a night, to gently stirring maybe once.

I was also in charge of him during the day.

The father figure is a police officer and so he works at night and sleeps during the day. If I had not been there he would have had to be confined to his crate.

They weren’t as “on board” with keeping him on a leash or tie down (it was too much work) but after having to crawl under the sofa where my friend was sleeping and pluck a puppy who was shredding the bottom of the sofa (brand new sofa I might add) a couple of times I was DONE with their method.

So on a leash he went and I tied him to my big dog’s aluminum crate while I worked. Meaning I could watch him; never ever would I leave him alone so he could hurt himself or strangle.

Next I brought over all of his toys and my big dog toys and let him have things to do.

Did he pitch a fit?

YES! Even my friend woke up mid sleep and said… “what did he do?” but thankfully since he too is a dog trainer he understood why I was doing what I was doing.

And, from here I could keep him from chasing the cat, grabbing shoes, eating the sofa, pooping in the corner and doing other dangerous things.

It also ensured that he could get used to his leash. Before I came he hated his leash, after a day or two he wasn’t fazed at all by it for more on help with your new dog or puppy and his leash click here.

potty training yorkie puppies, house training a pomeranian puppy, dog potty training tips

Dogs Should Go OUTSIDE or trained to go consistently inside

It May Seem Easier

It may seem easier to clean up after your puppy or your dog rather than keeping an eye on him or teaching him.

But eventually people get tired of stepping in poop, or their house smelling like poop, or perhaps they get new carpet and move…. but they are left with what THEY created a dog that has no problems pooping and peeing in the house and a habit that is almost impossible to break.

So DON’T DO IT

Do what you have to, to teach your dog. My little lab puppy Minion; was leash trained, learning sit, and not having accidents when I left.

If left to his own devices, in about 2-3 months he would be found on death row begging for a new family to love him because his old family didn’t spend the time it took to teach him just some simple basics. (not him of course since he is owned by dog trainers) but most dogs.

This is probably the #1 reason dogs in this country are euthanized, they aren’t clean and people don’t take the time to teach them the simple beginnings of this behavior.

These cute dogs get adopted and returned so often because they can’t be house trained that finally they are euthanized.

 

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There are 58 Comments

  1. Pam Campbell says:

    I have a 6 year old dog & he has separation anxiety. He pee’s & pops in my bedroom when I’m gone. He’s a little rescue dog. Part chocolate lab. & dashound. What should I do?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/claustrophobia-terror-dogs-tail/

    [Reply]

    marlene erhardt Reply:

    I have a 9 month old pug puppy and I’m having a hard time potty training her .I take her outside and she won’t go pee and I’ll bring her inside and she’ll pee and poop inside.What am I doing wrong?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    You’re not waiting long enough and chances are she is not on a leash inside.

    [Reply]

    Sande Reply:

    Try Comfort Zone with DAP from Petco. Like a Glade plug in but for dogs. There’s no scent so it won’t bother people with allergies. It works by releasing pheromones. The same pheromones a mother dog releases when she nurses. I had almost the identical problems with my Shepard and she is doing great now. One tip…buy it online. I check the online prices at Petco and then check eBay prices. You can save about 50 – 75 percent off the in store price.

    [Reply]

    Mariana Morales Reply:

    My dogs, a pair of Schnauzer’s have the same problem, just as i left my home for work they peed all over the living room. A friend of mine recommended to star using Doggy Pads and it has come out great, now they only pee on the pads so now i don’t get home tired to clean up their mess, i just pick up the pad and put it in the trash. it was a great solution. now we are training them so they only pee and poo when me and my husband walk them.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    If you want a dog that only goes potty outside, potty pads are confusing. If you don’t mind them going inside then it works alright. I have had dozens of clients use potty pads, then try to take them away and the dogs use rugs or pull down towels or use other things like laundry left on the floor.

    I find it is easier not to use them then to deal with the problems that come after you try and take them away.

    [Reply]

  2. Carol Ryan says:

    I have a seven-year-old miniature greyhound who I have had since she was six weeks old. She is extremely shy and has never been completely potty trained. I can no longer walk her because I suffer from osteoarthritis in my knees (I am 81) but do have a side yard where I can hook her up on a long, long leash and let her roam around. I put her outside six to eight times a day. She will pee-pee out there but seems to only poo-poo on the pee-pee pads I have in my bedroom and by the front door. She did this even when I was able to walk her outside on her leash. I guess at this point I can never expect her to be completely potty-trained in the yard?

    [Reply]

    Jeanne Reply:

    Some dogs really only respond to crate training (and it works for all dogs in general). The key is to get a crate with a divider than can adjust the size – at first you want it to be just big enough for the dog to turn around and lie down. You are not going to leave the dog in there for extended periods. Dogs do not want to soil their own den. This is the easiest way to house train, but also requires that you go out with you dog EVERY time, and praise them EVERY time they go outside, and get used to their rhythms. My dogs poop first thing in the morning, about twelve hours after feeding their major meal, and often a short time after a snack. There are no dogs in my experience that cannot be house trained. You just have to do the work.

    [Reply]

    Carole Reply:

    there are no dogs in your experience that cannot be house trained? This is hopeful -especially after Minnette has declared such dogs as hopeless. I have a chi that was allowed to do it all indoors and then her owner had to give him up due to illness. We have him doing it all outdoors and first thing in the morning, but when I tested it out after a couple of weeks, he went right back to doing it on the bathroom floor. I can’t live like this,but the dog is so sensitive and has been rejected twice by other owners. I’m not very happy…

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Oh NO I have never said a dog was hopeless. Habits are hard to break for sure but no dog is hopeless if you put in the effort. It just often takes a leash and time and a lot of change on your part.

  3. Kristie Campitelli says:

    Hi Chet,

    I purchased your program a while back for the main reason of potty training. I read and watched the video’s and followed them only with very little success for a short time. I know it depends on the people to follow through so I am not sure what I did wrong or is it just a lost cause. You are so right it is awful to live with the smell and the work to keep it clean.

    Part of the problem is that I have four cats and four dogs done of them are the same age so you have a lot of different things going on all at the same time.

    Other than ripping out the carpet do you have any suggestions that you can add to what I already have from your program “Hands Off Training”. I would really appreciate your input!

    Thanks,

    Kristie Campitelli

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    You have to teach your dogs, no excuses. Search this site for more on potty training and keeping them on a leash.

    replacing the carpet won’t help until the problem is solved.

    [Reply]

    Neil Reply:

    I agree with Minette that replacing the carpet is not the solution. However, removing it and replacing with laminate flooring or something like that might make it easier to clean up and less residual smell for you and your dog until you do get the dog trained properly.

    [Reply]

    Marilyn Reply:

    Laminate floor is not an answer. It is made of strips of pressed wood with a veneer of either plastic or wood. Problem is, it is not sealed between the strips. Puppy pees, it runs down between the strips and soaks in to the pressed board. Then you have permanent stink. You can just replace those boards, so if you do this, have 10 or 12 extra packages in the garage. linoleum, tile or old fashioned hardwood that is sealed with a coat of verathane is the only solution. None are cheap. Training is better.

    What I have discovered after having 6 dogs is that consistency is key, just like with kids. You have to be tough minded and not distracted by every cute thing that might not be acceptable in the long run. The pup that chews an old slipper will be the dog that eats your shoes. The dog who plays tug with old socks just might find your new ones appealing. They need structure. Think military. I once had a pure bred German Shepherd (big, big girl) who came to us from our business (car repair) where she was hurt. She came home to heal and never went back. We had originally adopted her from a pound. This gorgeous lady had been abused and would roll on her back when I was trying to train basic heeling. I would say no and down she would go. When she came home, she had not been housebroken, so I had the job of trying to break a 105 Lb 3 year old dog. One day I followed her to the living room. On the way I grabbed a paper towel roll. I caught her in mid squat, banged the paper roll on the coffee table and screamed no like a banshee. She never pottied in the house again. I am not sure this drastic method is always necessary, but she needed a strong hand and needed to be caught in the act for the behavior modification to work. I worked with her and she became the best dog I ever had. Even dropped a skunk she caught when I told her to. You can teach an old dog new tricks, it just takes a bit more work. I taught the younger ones to signal me by standing a the door with an excited “you wanna go out” followed by the dog getting excited. My now 110 Lb dog will stick his giant wet nose in my face and drag me out of bed to go outside. He was 3 when he was dumped with me. After 2 years, I rarely raise my voice, but I am firm with him. He has learned his limits.

    [Reply]

  4. Peter Mantu says:

    What a great post you have here. You really know a lot about dog training…keep up the good work!!!

    [Reply]

  5. Lyn says:

    We adopted a Lab cross male aged 7 mths, nearly two years ago. It has taken hard, diligent work to house train him. Everytime we thought he knew to let us know he needed out, he would have an accident. So back on the leash he would go. It has now been awhile since his last accident. Mind he has only recently been allowed off the leash overnight. The hardest part was training my husband, to read the signs that the dog needed to go out. This is the first time my husband has had to go through the potty training part. He is now retired, potty training was always my problem. He know acknowledges that it takes time and effort. He is also made to clean up the mess, that seems to have been the turning point for both man and dog.

    [Reply]

  6. Ingrid says:

    I became proud owner of a 4 and a half year old female Chihuahua about a month ago. She is a retired show dog, walks on the lead beautifully, doesn’t bark and is crate trained. I live in an apartment and want her to go potty on a potty training pad. I had about 6 pads scattered around the house. The first few days that I had her I took her to the pad every hour. She did not do a pee or poo for 2 days. I looked everywhere as to where she could’ve done her business, nothing to be found anywhere! She has the bladder of a camel! I took her for walks on the lead, same thing. I was seriously getting worried. Then suddenly she did a pee next to one of the pads. Good, that’s close. She did manage to do a few pees on the pad after a few more days. An odd one somewhere else on the carpet in the house. After a fortnight though, I thought she really understood what was required of her, most were on the same pad, or else the odd one on the carpet. She always did them on the same pad so I removed the other pads in the house. I replace the pads after 2-4 pees are on it. She will not do her business while on the lead, I figured that could be a show ring thing. Just in the last few days she is doing her pees everywhere except on the mat! Grr! I don’t understand. Her poos are usually near the pad somewhere but never actually on one. That’s ok, I can handle that because they are small and always solid. I feed her Science Diet dry food and some home cooked chicken and vegies at nite. Any ideas why she would suddenly be doing her pee all around the house? I have been chastising her when she does it on the carpet and I take her to the training pad. Am I suddenly doing something wrong? A couple of times I actually thought she was being naughty to punish me because I refused to pick her up while we were at the dinner table. Any thoughts would be welcome.
    Thank you
    Regards,
    Ingrid

    [Reply]

  7. Aubrey Hennigan says:

    I have a six month old male boxer. He is actually very well trained to go outside. He will stir during the night, but will go back to sleep till the wife gets up around 0330 and lets him out. He has pee’d on the tile floor one time. My issue is that he continually pulls out and chews my sprinkler/misters that are staked throughout the garden. Is there somthing I can spray these with. I know it is most like a chew/teething issue, but I certainly don’t condone it at all. Also, he plays full out, with several naps throughout the day. What a life. but he wants to sleep in the evenings by 6 p.m. Is there anything I can do to keep him up a little longer, or is this just a puppy phase. I mean once he is asleep in his little bed, you literally have to lift the bed to roll him out of it to get him outside. How funny.

    Thanks,

    [Reply]

  8. I guess I don’t understand, or read it wrong. You say these people are dog trainers??? How in the world can they let something like that happen to their own dog?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    It was their children that feel that way. And, they are busy parents like everyone else.

    The important thing is this month he is now potty trained.

    [Reply]

  9. Judy Hall says:

    I have a 5 yr old terrier poodle mix (16 lbs)and she usually goes potty outside. I do not have a doggy door but I leave my front door open a little so she can go outside and she does, buuuut every once in awhile even with the door open she will poop and pee in the house. At night she sleeps in a crate and when I let her out in the morning she knows to run to the front door to go out so I know she knows what she is suppose to do. This is frustrating. I am about to have spine surgery and am taking my dog to a friend but she is afraid my dog will potty in her house. What should I do.

    Thanks
    Judy

    [Reply]

    Sylvia Reply:

    Judy, first let me say good luck on your back surgery. I’ve had two and they’re no picnic but recovery doesn’t take as long as you would think. Keep positive and keep going! Hope you get your answer from Minette about your dog’s slip-ups soon. I have the same problem with my female Chihuahua. She was semi-paper trained when I got her and I think she is confused on which is pp-pad and which is the rug.

    [Reply]

    kathy Reply:

    this is a good question. I am attempting to potty train a 6 month old poodle. she knows what to do and I think I am missing her sign that she needs to go outside. I take her out quite often. I have tried a bell on the back door but she does not care about it. help! I have had her 3 months. I noticed the breeder did not begin any type of potty training and I feel I have gotten behind in the potty training dept. my pets have always been rescues and this is the first puppy I have begun training. I would appreciate any suggestions. if she doesn’t get trained this is a deal breaker. I can’t tolerate this and I feel like a failure.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    You are misunderstanding the bell. A bell means nothing to a dog… you have to teach them to wring it and then give it meaning. AND you must control your dog inside to keep them from having accidents.

    I don’t teach my dogs to ring the bell until they are basically potty trained. Read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/teaching-dog-puppy-ring-bell-successful-potty-training/

    [Reply]

  10. Gene says:

    Our 2 and 1/2 year old Shi-Tzuh has been potty-trained for at least two years, however, extremely loud fireworks this past July 4th have now scared him from going outdoors to our back yard, and he is starting to pee indoors again. What can be done in this situation?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Go outside with him for many nights maybe weeks or month and watch to make sure he goes. He can’t come in until he goes potty; I think you will see a change very quickly

    [Reply]

  11. Betty Walker says:

    I have a 3 year old blind pit. I work so it is impossible for me to house break him correctly. I have a room that i put a lot of newspaper on. in the middle of the night or even during the day if he is out of the room he finds his way to the room and uses the paper. I tried pp-pads but he would just chew them up. He used to pee anywhere but now he only uses the paper in his room. My room mate and I would take him out but he would seldum do his buisness outside. I have part of my driveway enclosed because I have anither dog but she won’t have anything to do with him. Trying to put a leash on is a battle. He gets so exicited you cant get it on him. If I could do that then maybe I can take him out two or three times after I get home and before I go to bed. I’m at a point that I don’t know what to do.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    If you put in the time to train anything is possible. You must train and desensitize him to his leash. If everytime he gets the leash put on he doesn’t go on a walk, it soon becomes less exciting and more normal.

    I think letting him potty in a room is probably a mistake if you are trying to teach him to go outside. It is all about consistency

    [Reply]

  12. Tina says:

    Chet,

    We had a Shi Tzu several years ago who never really got the potty thing down. We now have a terrier/chihuahua mix that we got from a shelter a few months ago who was about 1 year old. Same thing, not “potty smart.” (The big dogs we had were much better at potty training.) Thanks to your program I’ve realized that it isn’t the dog’s fault, but mine! I never invested in learning how to potty train with the Shi Tzu, but this time I was going to do things right!

    After watching a few videos and listening to a call you had with another trainer I bought a couple of gates to confine my small dog. The gates are a pain for the family to deal with, but they have been so great in keeping our dog in one place in the house. The space is a kitchen/sitting area which has linoleum flooring. She has not gone pee or poo once in this area. If I need to be in another part of the house I let her come with me, but insist she stays by my side where ever I am in the house. She has learned to squeeze through one of the gates when we are not home and we have found poop in the living room, so we know that we need to fix that gate. I still don’t trust her 100%, but we are on our way to her being fully potty trained.

    Thank you for your help and advice. It works!!!

    Tina

    [Reply]

  13. christine says:

    I agree…I’m now looking for a new pupy, but if I learn that “puppy is pee pad trained”, I RUN IN THR OTHER DIRECTION.
    Its a good uestion to ask the seller(breeder) especially if it is wintertime when you are looking for a pup. Human nature…Who wants to crate train a litter of pups in the snow?
    So, wait and buy the puppy in the warmer weather. Even then, “ask”, especially if lookinf for the smaller breeds.
    The best method in the world is “crate training and they learn FAST. Exercise pens, also “are not good for training. Some breedes tell you…Put their pillow bed on “one end” and “pee pads on the other…These pups become “confused”, and will just “walk to the other side of the kitchen” and pee on the floor/or throw rug.
    Do you work, put your “time in”, and pup will be barking from its crate after 2 weeks to let you know “I GOTTA go!”

    [Reply]

  14. Mary Kay Falkner says:

    Please help. I have 3 older dogs which are all potty trained, although the last one was a Yorkie and it took a long time. Now, I have a 7 month old new Yorkie, so that equals 4 dogs and 4 cats. It’s crazy around here. The new puppy is pottying all over the antique hard wood floors that cost a fortune. They are already stained by the last Yorkie. I hear the female tinkle is worse than the male tinkle. It stains more and goes deep down into the layers of wood. It will never be able to be removed by sanding or anything. It’s there forever. Anyway, I need help. This little fellow is hard to catch. His name is Hank. Hank likes to go outside and then he gets all involved with a leaf or a swig or his own feces (which he eats!) before I can catch him. He’s very fast! I’m very slow. (65 and arthritis), bone on bone knees. So, I do I stop him from eating his own stuff. I’ve already tried one chewable pill, so he won’t do it, but he does. Most of the time, I plays and then when I think all is well, I bring him back in and he goes and hides and pees or poops. What’s with that? I really need help badly. I’ve sent for your tapes and I watched about 1 hour and basically I’m sorry, but it was boring and you still haven’t mentioned potty training. I would have thought that would be your first thing out of the shoot!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    as the article and others say leash inside and crate

    [Reply]

    Marilyn Reply:

    For the wood floors. If they are a laminate, the pee is probably seeped between the boards. You will have to pull it up. If it is old fashioned wood floor, you will probably have to sand, deodorize and then seal with a Verathane. Before sealing, try using a “steam cleaner” carpet cleaner. Inject water and immediately suck it up. You might be able to get the stains out when it dries. I had a friend who refinished furniture and used to use bleach (or on pee, you could use oxi-clean) Let it dry thoroughly before sealing. To get the smell out, I found a deodorizer used for horse stalls. I found it at a large feed and tack store in our area (Murdoch’s). I put it in a large garden sprayer, dilute according to directions and spray. On the carpet, I just soak it and wait for it to dry. It is a much better product than Nature’s Miracle. I got it on the recommendation of a “disaster” cleaner. My kitty peed all over in her last week on Earth. She was 16, always used her box, but was ill. I spent the next year sniffing out her “gifts” to me! To get the stain (not the smell) out of carpet, and excellent product is Capture. It may be hard to find. Lowes and smaller vacuum stores carry it. It is a liquid followed by a powder you leave on over night.

    [Reply]

  15. Carolyn says:

    The very best thing to use is the CRATE. I have trained several puppies with a crate and never had a problem. If you are home take them outside right after they eat. If you have to work take them out first thing in the morning after breakfast, lunch if you can come home and dinner. Most dogs will not go in their crates, but if he/she does there are always the pads until you can get home.

    When they have learned to go outside and are a little older you can child-gate them in the kitchen and let them out immediately after you get home. It has always worked for me. Thank God for crates, they are safe and offer the dog their own protected space.

    [Reply]

    Judith Reply:

    Great advice. Thanks

    [Reply]

  16. Sheila says:

    We bought a 6-month old Yorkie puppy from a private party. We knew he was not potty trained at the time. However, we later found out that he had been kept in “puppy diapers”. Consequently, he walks around peeing as he did in diapers, sometimes creating a 6 to 10 foot stream of pee along the carpet. We have a doggie door and I take him outside once or twice an hour. But he continues to pee while he is walking. I’m at a total loss.

    [Reply]

  17. cynD says:

    Oh this is such a welcomed tid bit.. I have an 8 month old Pomeranian.. I have no idea where she poops or pees some times.. I have an older Shi-poo, who is awesome. until the the Pom came in to the picture… UGH.. the Pom is crated trained and sleeps there and naps there on her own. She will come in from out side and piddle…!! UGH Poo.. usually in the bathroom.. Keeping her on a lead at all times will make a difference.. I trained my wheaten that way. That did not take long at all! Thanks for the reminder.

    [Reply]

  18. tom says:

    The easiest thing i did to train all my puppies was to tether them to me at night and next to me during the day. It took about three or four days before the pups were sleeping through the night and giving me a tug on the leash during the day to let me know they had to go. All my pups were between 6 and 9 wks old when i got them. It does take dedication to train this way because you are at the pups command but like i said three days maybe four and i could let the puppy free during the day and laying next to me at night with no tether.

    [Reply]

  19. Robert says:

    I have a Boston Terrier female I started training her ffom the cage after feeding I would have her to follow me outside and keep her there until she do a 1 or a 2, then havecher to follow me back inside i would put her back in her cage when she gets restless I would carry her back outside and she would poop, She 2hrs old now when she need to go outside she comes and sit in front of me thats her signal to me that its time to go, She will get out of bar cage and bump the bed until she wake me she follow to the door when she finish she comes back and sit at the door until some one open it. It’s all about spending time with them.

    [Reply]

  20. anna elmy says:

    I just love the thought of that hulking great police officer sleeping in the dog crate!
    Seriously, I have just yesterday brought home a 10 week old Border Terrier bitch pup and I wiil follow your advice as the last pup was a real struggle to train. She would go out to pee but hang on till she was back on the carpet to poop. Must do better this time!

    [Reply]

  21. sherry says:

    I have a 7 yrs old collie that I got within the last 7 months from a rescue group and all winter long he was great….no pooping in the house but as soon as spring hit where he could go outside to lay down sit and do his business as much as he wanted to on his tie out, suddenly hes been pooping in the house. We recently bought cheap fence and the green stakes for it and fenced in the back yard so he could have more area to go in instead of on the tieout but that didnt help. We let him out for about a half hour in am before we leave for work an then as soon as we get home at 5 he goes back out and if its nice we are letting him stay out until 9 pm then he goes back out at 10:30 to 11 (quiet time in our area.

    After his last 3 pile afternoon mess I decided to lift up that piece of carpet he had been using as his bathroom and found out that apparently he had been repeatedly peeing on that carpet. The nap was so thick you couldnt tell. But when I lifted it OMG the smell. Thank God it was only an 6×6 piece but its a shame I had to throw it out. We had been leaving him loose in our basement living room/rec area while as work and now we have him locked into our small laundry room area about an 8×12 area to live at night and while we are at work. He seems to be ok with that havent seen any problems……yet. Its a cement floor area. But I hate doing that to him.

    [Reply]

    Judith Reply:

    Why can’t you leave a washable old blanker folded on the floor so he as something soft for his bones on concrete. That has to be bad. Tear the old blanket in half and fold it so you have one while you wash the other one.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    My dogs would rather lay flat on the ground where it is cold than lay on any blanket

    [Reply]

  22. Rebecca says:

    Hey,
    I have a six month old mini-aussie. I have worked very hard on potty/house training her. She just can’t get the idea. I just purchased TheDogTrainingSecret.com training program a few weeks ago. The main reason was for house training. I have not even tried Chet’s technique, because I am the oldest child in a family of six people, and we use all of the rooms in our house several times a day each, so having to gate off everything would be a large inconvenience. I have watched Chet’s YouTube video on house breaking, and have tried to confine our puppy to the only the most necessary rooms (which are three: two very small laundry rooms, and our carpeted kitchen).

    HELP!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Use a crate or a leash as the article suggests

    [Reply]

  23. Brenda says:

    One spate of days I did not clean up, and the girls waited. My Lucy has some anxiety problems that caused her to be afraid of doors. This makes house training problematic, and there is additional fallout. So I am going to get my dear Lucy a Thundershirt and see if this will help her to feel calmer so she can not bark at loud trucks, or try to bite me if I move unexpectedly. She loves me, that’s a fact. Back to the pooping, I found that they will wait until 7am, and when I see them do it outside, I praise them. As for the dog food, IAMS makes really stinky poo, but, Wal-Mart carries grain free foods in lamb or chicken and rice. Arguably rice is technically a grain but you can give rice cereal to babies so it is okay. One comes in a white bag with blue lettering, the other is in a black bag. I have 2 Collies so they get chicken. Their coats and skin are good. Thanks for posting this, keep you updated

    [Reply]

  24. Peggy says:

    We have a real potty training issue with a beagle we adopted. We think perhaps he has been abused. He is sweet and loves to sleep with us. However, he won’t do anything outside. Here are some of the awful things he does at times. This morning he tinkled in the water bowl. He will go in the kitty toy with the ball. I have never given up a dog but I don’t know what else to do. We have two older dogs and two cats. My thoughts are if I could find a loving couple that has a big yard, would walk him, take him with them a lot (he loves to ride in the car) he would house break easy. What are your thoughts – we really do love him…

    Thank you so much.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Potty training isn’t easy and it has nothing to do with the puppy it has everything to do with you read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/potty-train-truth-potty-training/

    [Reply]

  25. Iris Wilson says:

    I bought a darling pup who is a Pomapoo. Nobody has told me how much food to feed her. She is about 4-5 lbs, a miniature. Do I feed her 2 or 3 times a day. She likes to eat 3 meals when we eat ours. I think it is too much and lately, she is very picky and will only eat Oscar chicken. She will not eat dry. Help! I don’t want a fat dog.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I’ve never seen a normal dog (not sick) starve itself.. I have seen dogs hold out because owners give in and cook for them.

    Would you eat dry or would you hold out and wait for chicken? If you didn’t have a choice after a day or two you would eat dry. In the wild dogs go a few days without eating… there is no need to panic if she skips a meal or two.

    I feed my dogs twice a day, I put the food down for 5 minutes and if they don’t eat it.. I pull it up and take it away. They learn to eat what they are given when they are hungry

    [Reply]

  26. Vern Brickner says:

    I have a older Bichone female who is spoiled. She was given to us about 2 yrs ago. She will bark when she want in,but won’t let us know when she needs to go out. Is she still trainable for that? No place to put a doggie door.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Read this to find out why it is going to take more work and diligence on your part. http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/bad-habits-hard-break/

    [Reply]

  27. kay says:

    I have a 10 month old pug,she is paper trained,I am trying to outside train her.But no luck my husband say’s I should take the paper up.well I did and quess what,she did her job on carpet.plus she is so hiper she will not mind at all.Please help “ready to pull my hair out”

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    choose inside or outside… doing both “with paper” is confusing. Then use our search bar at the top for help with more articles

    [Reply]

  28. Marisa says:

    I have a 5 month old boxer that pees every minute she is chasing my dachshund. We take her out even let her stay outside for 30 minutes or more as soon as she walks back into the house and pees she is even on a leash she has stopped peeing in her crate I have never had this much trouble house breaking a dog HELP

    [Reply]

  29. Pamela Basham says:

    7 week old lab does well outside to use bathroom . But as soon as she comes back inside she pees where ever. She lets you know when she needs out. What can I do to train her on pads inside.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Potty pads will make it worse, at this age it is more about getting them outside every hour or two on a schedule and keeping her with you.

    Teaching your dog to pee in the house just makes it more confusing and creates a really bad habit.

    [Reply]

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