I Just Drove Down the Road on a Sunny Day with My Windshield Wipers On

I LOVE These BTW Thanks to collegehumor.com for the photo

I LOVE These BTW Thanks to collegehumor.com for the photo

Yup, I am THAT person!

When you have dogs, especially if you compete or do anything public with them at all; you learn a lot about humility usually very quickly.

I have also learned that in order to be a good dog trainer, you have to not care what other people think.

I have had to get down on the ground, play bow, clap, run around and do all kinds of crazy thing to engage and or reward a dog!  And, I would do it again!

I Will Do Just About Anything in the Name of Dog Training

I will do just about anything in the name of good dog training and trying to give a dog a good experience or work through a bad one.

So my youngest pup is about 8 months old and working through, hopefully his last fear stage, some things bother him (mostly city noises) and some things don’t (I think he could be run over by a tractor and not care) so we are working on the city things.

I am a Country Mouse

Me and my Pharaoh

Me and my Pharaoh

But, I am happy to report I am a country mouse; which is probably why he doesn’t care about country noises.

So I have to drive the baby the 45 minutes or more for a good walk in the city.

He is getting better, and I am teaching him that if he is apprehensive he can trust in me to overcome any environmental challenges.

If He Sees Something He is Unsure of I Let Him Check It Out

If he sees something he is unsure of I encourage him to check it out.

I don’t get nervous because I don’t want him to feel any difference in how I encounter my environment.

The leash is like a tether to your emotions, when you get nervous or scared your dog feels it through the leash.  It’s not magical (ha ha) it is usually because you tighten your grip or get stiff or your cadence changes.

I do my best to keep everything relaxed and let my pup explore.

Right Now I Don't Even Care if He Pulls

Right now I don’t even care too much if he pulls, I can clean that up later.

Don’t get me wrong, he isn’t allowed to pull me all over the place, I don’t want to feel beat up or sore when I get home; but I do let him explore.

In order to gain confidence in his environment he needs to explore a bit and figure things out on his own.

If he was terrified, I would take complete control and make him adhere to strict obedience and that would help him relax and feel better about whatever he is doing.  Obedience can really help a dog that is scared or nervous because it is hard for them to multitask.

But instead of relying on me to control his environment and take on all challenges I would like to see him explore and figure out not everything is trying to kill him.

Asleep on my Leg Prior to Hitting the Wipers

Asleep on my Leg Prior to Hitting the Wipers

Socialization is First!

So socialization is first, and precise obedience will come once I have a very confident dog in all areas.

We’d Had a Good Session

So we had had a good training and socializing session, I had made him work for his breakfast while I allowed him to explore his environment.

He saw his first screaming baby in a stroller and took everything in stride.

I was actually quite proud of him.

He Hit the Windshield Wipers on My Car

But on the way home, in an attempt to rub himself on me for affection; he hit the windshield wipers of my car.

I have a very cute two seater hybrid, and there isn’t a lot of room in there for me, much less for a wild puppy!

So it is no surprise that he pulled down my wipers; however he wasn’t sure what to do about the sight of them.

He was definitely taken aback but he wasn’t terrified.

He Wasn't Terrified... Just Taken Aback

My old Malinois used to be terrified of the windshield wipers; if they were on he was hiding somewhere in the car and it made car travel sad and stressful.  The same thing had happened when he was a baby but it terrified him and he was never able to totally get over it.

But my Pharaoh wasn’t terrified (or I would have turned them off and worked on it in a more controlled environment later) he was just a little stressed.

So I left them on and put treats on my dash board.

Thanks True to Dogs for the Photo  Sometimes You Have to Let them Work it Out

Thanks True to Dogs for the Photo
Sometimes You Have to Let them Work it Out

No cooing at him or telling him he was okay, I just let him figure it out on his own.

We probably drove 20+ miles on a sunny day with the wipers on; just letting him realize he wasn’t going to die and that when they were on treats were on the dash for the taking.

By the time I made it home he was much less stressed and more happy to take his treats, but the next time he travels in the car the wipers will go on again.

Riding in the car by itself is a reward because it is a fun thing to do and we usually go somewhere to do something fun, add some treats to that and it is even better.

So the moral of the story is you never know how your dog will react to something; but the more important thing is how YOU react to it!  It doesn’t matter what other people think, all that matters is what is best for you and your dog!

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Comments

  1. Charles Rein says:

    I have a rescue dog. When I first got him he went up and down stairs. Then something must have spooked him and he wouldn’t go up the stairs, but will go down them. We have to carry him up. Can you help?
    Thanks
    C Rein

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I would use whatever motivates him.

    Start by using great treats and then feed him upstairs.

    He’ll learn to go upstairs because he is hungry

    [Reply]

  2. June Pound says:

    Hi Minnette
    My dog is afraid of thunderstorms which is not irrational really except when you are an indoor dog and perfectly safe in the house.
    She is an alpha bitch and very attached to my son but, when afraid, it is to me she comes as though I can fix it! I think she sees me as the boss female in the house!
    I have yet to learn how to fix this fear of thunder and lightning. Fortunately it does not happen often.
    I myself would prefer not to be outdoors when a storm is brewing so would be perfectly happy if she, like another dog I had 20 or so years ago, indicated that perhaps we should not walk any further but head for home and shelter.
    I have warned my son never to have her off lead when a storm is brewing just in case! What are your thoughts about this?
    June

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/nix-dealt-fourth-july-thunderstorms/

    [Reply]

  3. John Ahern says:

    I have a 5 year old lab. A big softhearted dog, that is with me 24/7.
    I do a lot of construction work, although I am retired, and the dog comes with me to the jobs sites or places where I am working. He usually sleeps on the driver’s seat of my truck or in the shade nearby while I am working but always in earshot of me and what I am doing.
    He has been exposed to about all the noises that you will hear such as saws, drills, routers, hammers, vacuum cleaners, etc. both inside a house or at a distance, with no problem, but the other day I used a compressor and he ran a mile. I eventually caught up with him and managed to get him back in the truck but he was obviously not happy, and in the end, I had to stop using the compressor.
    The problem now is that my neighbor has now purchased a compressor and has started using it frequently in his garage. The minute he starts it up the dog panics to get in the house. I have tried all things I know to assure him that it will not hurt him, such as treats, holding him in my arms near the fence, even running the vacuum cleaner/radio in the house to deaden the noise, but nothing seems to work.
    Unfortunately the neighbor is not the “friendly type” and I know if I asked him to limit using it he would do the opposite just to upset the dog and be annoying.
    Short of moving,(really not an option) I don’t know what to try next. Any ideas would be helpful.
    Thank you, John.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/understanding-desensitization-dog-training/

    True phobias and fears are very difficult to over come.

    you have to find their motivators and work within their comfort zone

    The good thing is that labs are known for liking food, I’d try feeding him from a distance he can barely hear the compressor and then work closer.

    You can even use a little canned dog food to make it more of a motivator to overcome his fears.

    [Reply]

    Marjie Reply:

    There is now an item called a “thunder shirt”. It is a tight-fitting “garment” that you put on a dog during thunder. Apparently, it gives emotional support and calms the dog down. You can also put a T-shirt on the dog and pin it so it fits tightly. I would think this would be unsightly when the dog is outside. If this item calms a dog during thunder storms, it seems possible it would work when your neighbor runs his conmpressor. I heard about this in a Whole Dog Journal. Maybe you could go on the Internet to look for it. Thank goodness our current dog is unfazed by thunder. Our previous dog, a Golden, was terrified so I know the terror he feels. Good Luck to both of you.

    [Reply]

  4. Doreen Whalen says:

    Hi — my dog hates the car. He’s terrified at just passing the door. I don’t know quite how to get him to overcome his terror. It hasn’t prevented u from putting him in the back seat but he just shivers and buries his head in the corner of the seat.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/dogs-carsickness/

    [Reply]

  5. Warren Drye says:

    My response is to the girl(lady) with the Malinois and the windshield wipers. If she has had one before or for very long, she now knows; a “Mal” can be trained for EXACTLY what you want them to be, but for some reason, they are subject to loud noises that have to be dealt with. My first one was trained two years as a Police dog but never got over being gun shy(that’s how I got her). I had her 16(that’s right she was 18) when I nearly died having her put down. I wanted nothing to do with another dog but the Adoption Agency for them talked me into another one and 10 people brought her from Baton Rouge Fla. in short legs of course, one Sat.Have had her about 6 month’s now but goes crazy wanting to charge when I crank the riding mower or a delivery truck drives up. They are so different you must agree to some training about them unless familiar with them and I was after 16 yrs. I found out she is so aggressive, she will go after anything on wheels and had to take her to mail box on leash everyday and she would charge cars on a busy road. I just scolded and said “NO” every time she did it but haven’t broke her from the lawn mower yet. Having to work on that aggressiveness too, as she will go after a stranger if not in her kennel or on a chain. A few have stomped feet at her which makes it worse. If I see then in time I warn not to do that. She was in several Foster homes and always in a crate before I got her but time permitting now, watching TV, she is in my lap or on a bed beside me. Have wondered what she would do if someone touched me and her present, but don’t want to test it just yet.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Oh yes! I have had many Mals and they are different for sure (although I think people with other herding breeds have some of the same problems)

    I chalk a lot of his puppiness up to being a Malinois right now and he is learning to be comfortable in his own skin and confident in his environment

    [Reply]

    Warren Drye Reply:

    I had never heard of the Breed until I got the one I had to put down and now wouldn’t consider anything else.they are slowly switching from German Sheppards to the “Mal’s” because they get the same thing from a 55-60# dog instead of 90=100#.They used one to get Osama BenLaden. They are like bird dogs (had many in past)Don’t have to train them what to do,just how to do it, Policing just comes natural. Love my “Mal”, my car tag is; LUVMYDOG I agree with the lady about restraining in the car if possible. I paid $65.00 yesterday to have car seat fixed where collar tore it and she was tied to head rest on back seat but trying to get to my lap, tore it. “Malenwah’s” forever!!!!!!!!!!
    Would appreciate any suggestions for that aggressiveness, of course without ruining her Guard Dog capabilities

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Like you said I would not worry about her guard dog capabilities. I would put her barking on command and then I would give her the best obedience training possible so you learn to have control of her!

  6. Diana says:

    Hello Minnette,
    I understand why treats are important in helping Pharaoh overcome his fears of windshield wipers, but from what I read it appears that you don’t restrain him while riding in the vehicle, otherwise he wouldn’t be able to reach treats on the dashboard. Is that correct? I always use a harness attached to the seatbelt to restrain my dog for safety, particularly in case of an accident. Is that not something you’d recommend while training?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I have a tiny two seater car he can be in the front seat and still reach the dash

    [Reply]

  7. nUTI says:

    Hello Minet..My dog has the same problem,when cars go by and are to laud,he goes crazy,but when walk on the street he is just a little agitated,just,looking around and I keep teling him is ok,the same with lawn mower .I stop and let him do what he like,try to bite then if no noises just stop.I ghes will take time with that.Anoter problem he had was terrify to go in the dog house.Well I tought I must try something.As my husbent build a big dog house I got in and call him .Few times he come then out come and out,then I sat doun and call him again.He came in and as he look at me I set on the blanket and told him,comeon Gypsy,he came then I sead,set down.I was surprise he did then bunch of kisess and start to lik hes foot.Then I saw confidents on him.Later that day was rain and I go to look what he is doing and yeap he was in.Sence then he is allways in dog house.I was very proud of him,beeng an outside dog that was NR.1 problem.My Gypsy is realy smart and I agree training school dose help lots in meny area..All the best.Nuti

    [Reply]

  8. Debi London says:

    My dog freaks when we go over a bridge in the car. It is a very distinct noise and bothers her. I keep a jar of peanuts in the car and go VERY slow back and forth over the bridge all the while feeding her nuts. I make sure no one is behind me so I can go EXTRA slow. I start with windows closed, then part way open, then finally open some more. Slowly but surely we are getting there.
    Repetition is key. and treats.

    [Reply]

  9. Debi London says:

    My dog also does not to be walked NEAR the bridge – loud noises of cars and trucks going over – so every morning I bring her dry food and treat with me to work on it. I feed her near and get closer as she gets relaxed. We have been doing this about 3 weeks now and I am just now seeing some progress. I want to be able to WALK my dog to the beach in a relaxed manner because right now I have to put her in the car and coming back get way too much salt in the car….I only live 1/2 mile to beach and I like to run the beach, too. TIME and PATIENCE and TREATS! ps: cut up hot dogs in little bits and sauté in pan, great treats – keep hot dogs in freezer – buy when they are BOGO at store.

    [Reply]

  10. Janice Anderson says:

    We have a rescue poodle that goes crazy when we leave home. She’s fine when we’re home, but no matter where we try to put her when we leave, she goes nuts. We’ve tried leaving her in the laundry room with bed, water and pee paper. Also tried a puppy playpen — which, from inside it, rolled it the whole way across the floor, around a corner, into the laundry room and closed the door !! We leave music on. We’ve tried to “sneak” out the front door, have opened the garage door, then came back in the house for a long time to confuse her. How do we deal with separation anxiety?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/claustrophobia-terror-dogs-tail/

    [Reply]

  11. bill says:

    hi my black lab can not relax and be himself when there are flys around. he is not afraid of them but hides because he cant get them all.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I’d try fly spray, they will carry it at your vet that is safe for him and it will keep them out of his direct area.

    [Reply]

    Warren Drye Reply:

    About the fly’s!! You won’t believe me until you try it but learned something recently. One of those crazy things !!!! , Put pennies(yes copper pennies) in a plastic bag filled with water and hang it up around where the fly’s are. Don’t ask me how it works but it doe’s. Some say it is the reflection of the pennies in the water or something like that.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I have heard that! I will have to try it… luckily flies aren’t a huge issue where I am at 🙂

  12. Jean says:

    My Australian Shepherd, Lilly, is afraid of two things.
    The sound of the teeter at agility, so no more classes 🙁
    and the sound the dog food bag makes. Especially the one the frozen raw food comes in.

    I can understand her not liking the bang of the teeter but I don’t understand the fear of a dog food bag. I have put the empty (sealed) bag on the floor so she can sniff it and given her pieces of the raw food (which is for a different dog) when she approaches but once she takes the food, she immediately runs back to her safe spot.

    Any suggestions?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/understanding-desensitization-dog-training/

    I would try wiggling the bag as you feed her smaller pieces so she associates the sound with the food… but you’ll have to cut up the food a bit.

    [Reply]

  13. Pam Maddock says:

    I have a 9 mo old Pembroke Welsh Corgi and he seemed to have two fears so far that I’ve seen.. Initially, he was afraid of the vacuum but now after being encouraged to sniff it while on and touch it he is okay with it going around him. But I cannot trust him to be off leash around any cars. How can I stop this behavior? I have tried feeding him when they go by but so far, it doesn’t make any difference. He will pull and ignore me when they are going past us on a walk. I can’t even effectively block him from looking, he’s so determined to chase them. My own fear is the leash might give way every time so I’d really like to get him to find a safer attitude about cars. Probably I tense up and he knows I’m tense about the cars too…any suggestions how to approach this problem?

    [Reply]

  14. Jerry Feldman says:

    Buddy’s main problem is just about anything motorized. Especially golf carts, skateboards, bicycles, motorcycles and sometimes joggers. All above especially if going towards him or passing. I think it’s fear!

    Buddy does well when I take him to Costco’s, Trader Joe’s, market and even department stores. He is my Military Service Dog, registered and has credentials. He walks side by side, stops when I stop. In these situations, he’s great.

    Like a Jeckle and Hyde.

    [Reply]

  15. keith watts says:

    Help
    My springer spaniel is terrified of pedal cycles, chidrens scooters, skateboards, and roller skates. He is really afraid when any of these forms of transport pass near or any distance from him. After they have passed the fear takes a while to pass, and he continually looks over his shoulder to see if more are coming. Walking is now getting a serious problem and taking him stresses me also, I don’t know how to cpoe with this problem.

    Keith

    [Reply]

  16. Terre Jacobs says:

    Hi,
    Sampson is a 1 yr old long hair chihuahua. He is a rescue dog. I’ve had him about 3 mo. He is petrified of my keys. He also will bark and growl at other dogs and act mean UNTIL they bark then he cowers and hides behind my leg. These 2 issues make going for a walk or ride in the car stressful.

    Terre

    [Reply]

  17. Lynda says:

    Hi:
    Can you please help me. I have a minpin/chihuhua mix. “Dewy”. I have tried everything, and if he doesn’t stop acting like hes going to rip your head off, we will get kicked out of the trailer park. Hes a sweet boy, until…he sees another dog, person. He goes into attack mode. shows his teeth, barks incessantly, and if I intervene, he snaps at my hand. He has to be on a leash. when I let him in the cage where he has to poop, at the park, with other dogs he acts crazy at first and sometimes he can become friends. somethimes he grabs their skin by their mouth and pulls. Im afraid he will play too hard too and do that. He is 2 yrs old, neutered, all of his shots. Ive tried the “thundershirt” (except, it is too hot to use it right now) didn’t help that much. Ive tried to socialize him, using a muzzle, all he wants to do is get it off. Ive given him calming tabs, he just wants to be the boss. we have another dog “Mini”, she is full breed min pin, she barks with him sometimes incessantly, but doesn’t go after dogs or people. shes 7. I have also tried a bark collar that made a sound, hes so hyper that it was beeping all the time. I tried the can of air, it scares him but in no time he forgot about it. I don’t have the money to take him to a class right now. any suggestions, > Frantic !

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    With aggression like this that I cannot see with both dog and human aggression and worrying for your own safety I would recommend a veterinary behaviorist.

    sometimes dogs are an investment to keep them healthy and to keep them from biting and a veterinarian who specializes in aggression is the best route to go.

    [Reply]

  18. Bianca says:

    Hi 🙂 Every night my dog scratches at the window like crazy and i don’t know why… we don’t like putting him into our bathroom…. what must we do?

    [Reply]

  19. Erika says:

    Hi,

    I have an American bull dog/ lab. She is 8 months old and she is terrified of plastic bags. Mostly if they are seen outside blowing in the wind. I suppose it looks like a creature of some sort to her. I have gotten bags out for her to a sniff. I make sure she see’s me holding it to show its not harmful and then I lay it on the ground. She sniffed but as soon as it makes the crinkle noise or moves she’s afraid. Any unfamiliar object blowing in the wind is scary to her. What should I do? Also, one time when we were on our walk on our usual route there was an unexpected car (bright red SUV) parked in our path and she was terrified. Even though she loves going for rides and doesn’t scare when a car passes on our walk. Was she scared because it wasn’t apart of our routine? I had to turn around and go a different way. What could I have done to show her it was ok?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I had a dog with bag issues… you have to work at their comfort level, but I worked my dog to the point that I could get the bags out and rattle them and then pet her with them as I fed her great treats.

    In time she learned she wasn’t going to die.

    Some dogs get stuck in their ways and you have to work at their pace to let them know that new things are okay and not something to fear.

    [Reply]

  20. Susan says:

    I have an 8 month old Wheaten Terrier. My biggest problem is his lack of eating. Yes lack of. He will only eat if he has play time, and not with me, with other dogs. When he was younger he would play with me, toys, his pool etc but he has now decided he dosent want to play with mom. ONLY other dogs which then after play he will eat. I have tried walking him and playing with him to work up an appetite. NO LUCK? He loses weight (ounces) daily if we dont do the dog park or puppy play with other friends dogs. My schedule doesnt not always allow for this type of play everyday! Thoughts? Suggestions?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Get up earlier if that is what he needs.

    Also make him work for his food so it is more interactive and social.

    I have never seen a dog that wasn’t sick starve itself, so he may be skinny but chances are he will eat when he needs to, even if it is not as often if you want.

    If you have doubts contact your veterinarian

    [Reply]

  21. Jody Anderson says:

    I would like to know what to do with my puppy who starts to pee when I am trying to pick him up. He has just started this in the last two months. Frustrated and lost. Thank you for your help.

    [Reply]

  22. Dave Sharp says:

    I have a belgium tervuren that i had shipped to California from Missouri receiving her when she was 3 months old. She is now six months old. She was afraid of everything from cars, air planes, trash cans, man hole covers, everything. She was whelped on a farm where the closest neighbor was five miles away…My concern is that she is still afraid of me and i don’t know what needs to be done to extinct this fear. She has warmed up to other people and her new environment for the most part, but still is afraid of me. I have had her to puppy socialization classes and will be taking her to beginning obedience training soon. To try to break her fear and build a relationship, the instructors told me to find a treat that she likes and just keep giving it to her in hopes that she would eventually make the connection that i am on her side. being treat driven she has learned to sit, lie down, shake her paw and bump my hand on command, but only when i have the chicken treat. she is an intelligent dog. i found she loves cooked chicken as a treat. As long as i have chicken, she is my dog, but once the chicken is gone, she reverts back to being afraid of me. She is often so scared that she won’t even take the chicken treat when i first approach her. I feed her, walk her and try to love her, but she stays resistant to me. I get up to take her outside in the middle of the night for pooping and she will let me touch her and pet her then, sometimes, but during the day time its like she wakes up and tries to stay clear. If i even try to call her to me, she is out the doggie door into the back yard.

    It seems that she is better than when she first came to us, but still miles away from being a dog that is affectionate and trainable. I keep her on a twelve foot lead when she is indoors so that i can get her if i need to. She doesn’t like it, but it seems that she knows that i can get her if she has the leash on and she reluctantly submits, with her tail between her legs, but sometimes she will sit for me… but take the leash off and she knows that i cant get to her and she reverts to the scared dog that stays away. She still would rather go to a stranger than to come to, and be with me.

    I continue to feed her the chicken in hopes that we can extinguish this fear, but i am becoming more and more doubtful. I like to describe her as the best dog that chicken can buy, but at some point i will exhaust the chicken supply for california. I am kinda resigning myself that this dog will have to be trained to do what i need it to do, and that it will never love me as its owner and trainer. the professional trainers (Lomita Dog Training Club) at the obedience class say she behaves like an abused dog, only an abused dog would have relaxed by now. I need help and don’t know what to do. Most of dog training and working with the dog is dependent on our relationship to each other which seems we don’t have. help!

    [Reply]

  23. kathy says:

    My dog barks at people when we are parked in the car and they walk by. She won’t stop even if I tell her to. What can I do?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    look up articles at the top in the search bar for “quiet”

    [Reply]

  24. wendy says:

    Any suggestions to help a dog that wants to chase cars while riding in a vehicle? I have a Belgian Shepherd that has wanted to chase cars ever since he was about six months old. I worked with a trainer for a short time that only wanted to flip him on his back every time he lunged at a car. I started walking him near traffic and using the “leave it” command. When he leaves it and turns to me he gets a treat. So far it seems to work. His chasing in a vehicle is a whole different story. I had to crate him while riding because otherwise he would tear my vehicle apart trying to get at the passing cars. This works as long as the crate is covered. I would like to have him ride in the car with me though. So far trying to do it, has not worked. He still has an obsession with passing cars

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/cohabitating-herding-dog/

    [Reply]

  25. wendy says:

    I have a Tervuren and mine is a very skittish. I exposed him to lots of noises, people and other dogs right from the start when he was just 10 weeks old, but it wasn’t until we started playing a lot together that he really started to bond to me. He loves to play!!! Before that he could care less if I was around and cares even less about treats. Maybe find something fun that she likes to do? Chase the ball? Frisbee? Does she tug? That is what mine loves to do, and will do anything if I will play tug with him. Some trainers said doing agility would help, but mine hates agility, so that did not build his confidence or increase our bond. With some Tervs it helps I was told.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    A dog has to really either want to please you, or be rewarded and played with often to do agility.

    I bet if you used those toys and tugging often enough when he does agility that he would learn to love it; but it would take time.

    [Reply]

  26. Barbara says:

    My pug is afraid to ride in the car. I would love to take him with me when I go to the lake or wherever he can go. Help me calm him doen

    [Reply]

  27. christina foster says:

    our dogs are scared of the thunder and fire works i try to come them down with saying it is ok nothing is going to hurt you but i do not now what cause that when i got them at five weeks to three months they are now 7 and 10 years of age and they are still scared of those thing so how do i can help them every time they hear big booms like that

    [Reply]

  28. Cheryl says:

    I have a 3 year old Shitzu that was terrorized by the fourth of July fireworks this year. She wouldn’t go outside even to go to the bathroom and was going in the house! The thunder shirt did not work and we had to call the vet for medication just to get her through the Fourth of July. She will go out now but only if I go out the door first and I have to stay outside with her or she runs right back inside. I have tried the training treat rewards and praise….but nothing is working. She just will not go out without one of us with her. If we go back into the house she will stand at the door and bark until you either go out with her or let her in. We never had a problem with her before the fourth. Please help!

    [Reply]

  29. Melanie Stromberg says:

    What do I do about my 8 month old labrador? She’s a lovely dog, but terrified of walking on hard floors. We have wooden and laminate floors. She puts her front paws on the floor, but just can’t bring herself to move the back paws forward. It’s as if there’s an invisible thread tied round her back legs, holding her back. Bless her!
    What should I do?

    [Reply]

  30. CJ Travis says:

    Help! I have an about 8 month old feist – maybe part terrier and some other stuff – just under 20 pounds, and last night something changed in his attitude. I found him running down the middle of the road on Route 66 in the desert about 5 months ago, so I have no idea what his early puppyhood was like. I have showered him with affection, worked at training him and taking him on car rides and playing with him. He’s independent, hard to train, and also relatively loving and pretty cuddly for the most part. He sleeps in our bed with us and last night he growled and bit my husband and continued to growl, so I put him in his crate for the night. He cried and yelped most of the night, but I didn’t know what else to do. I can’t let him bite like that. He seemed to be afraid of the pillows when they were lifted up, I think. This morning I greeted him lovingly when I took him out of his crate to go outside for potty, but now he’s curling his lip and growling at me every time I go to touch or cuddle with him. What could have changed? I’m freaked out because I love him so much and am afraid that our relationship is forever damaged. Right now my heart is breaking. Please help!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Find a veterinary behaviorist in your area

    [Reply]

  31. karen waye says:

    I am hoping you can help my dog is just terrified when I go through the car wash I don’t do it too often with him in the car but have to make him like a tent in back seat that he can hide under he is sooo scared when I am outside the car at car wash and the water is hitting against the car

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    perhaps don’t take him for this? Some dogs have paranoia and can’t be reasoned with in this state

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  32. Juanita says:

    I have a Thunder coat for my little dog. In Canada most Vetenaians sell them. Mine works great.

    [Reply]

  33. Matt says:

    I have a five month year old lab that is terrified of water. We have put her in the pool and she can swim and we taught her how to get out and she did an amazing job but is still terrified. Anyone have any suggestions?

    [Reply]

  34. Deborah Lucas says:

    We have a two year old Boxer, a rescue who has attached himself to my step son, who adores him. The only problem is, he refuses to go outside to go potty with my two other Boxers when it is me who is taking them outside, unless my son goes too. It is frustrating, because sometimes my son is too busy to go outside with us. Do you have any suggestions or helps to get him to go potty outside with me?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    You just have to make him go and if he doesn’t potty, crate him until he does

    [Reply]

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