My Dog Just Had A Seizure

My Nix spooning with his best friend

I have insomnia lately.  I am not sure why, but I think it is heat related; pair that with the fact that my husband works at night and is up extremely late on the weekend and my desire to spend time with him, means I have been up till 4 or 5 in the morning each night.

It was a blessing that I was unable to sleep last night; otherwise I could have slept right through it.  At about 3 o’clock in the morning, this morning my 11 year old dog (who sleeps on the bed) sat up, his body got stiff, his tongue dropped out of his mouth, he started drooling, his head bobbed to the side and his eyes and pupils shook up and down.  He was suffering from his first ever seizure.

Automatically, thanks to my veterinary technician background, I recognized the signs and told my husband, who also acknowledged trouble, that he was seizing.  With calmness of mind, I asked him to press his stop watch and time the seizure and to also get up and turn on the light so I could see well and monitor his condition.  His seizure lasted for about 2 and a half minutes.  Most seizures last less than 2 minutes.

Thankfully I am good in an emergency and able to keep a cool head.  At one point I considered and began the process to becoming a police officer, but I enjoyed working with animals too much to give that up.  Once his seizure was over, he seemed normal laid back down and went to sleep.  That is when I lost all control.

Whereas I can handle an emergency in those moments, it is hard to be a “mom” and watch your baby suffer and be unable to do anything about it!  Although, I have worked seen and worked with many seizing dogs this is the first time it has happened to my own.  I definitely have a new empathy for dog owners who have to suffer through watching their dogs seize and not being able to do anything about it!

First thing this morning we headed off to the vet for an exam and blood work and Nix seems fine.  I however am still traumatized.  Just sitting down and writing this or anything else is difficult!  But, I am hoping that I will be able to help others that travel down the road of seizures of epilepsy with their dogs!

About Seizures

There are several types of seizures and subcategories, but the most common are Generalized (gran mal and petit mal) and Focal (partial) seizures.   My dog had a Focal Seizure because it mostly occurred in one area of his body; his face.

What Causes Seizures

  • Toxins
  • Metabolic disease
    puppy training, my dog had a seizure

    Seizures can be debilitating

    • Low blood sugar
    • High blood sugar
    • Kidney and/or Liver disease
    • Anemia
    • Heart and Lung disease
  • Genetics (some seizures disorders are hereditary)
  • Primary or Secondary Brain Cancer
  • Inflammatory diseases
  • Damage to the Brain

What to Do During a Seizure

  • Stay calm!  Although it is difficult panic will not help either of you.  A clear head will help you later!
  • Make sure he is safe and will not fall down stairs or onto anything sharp or that might hurt him.  Unplug anything near him so he doesn’t get tangled.
  • Start a timer!  This is crucial! Seizures lasting over 5 minutes require the assistance of your veterinarian immediately.  Seizures that last over 30 minutes can cause brain damage or death.
  • If someone is with you and you can, record the episode so your vet can see it himself.
  • Observe exactly what is going on and where it is going on.  If the seizure starts in one area of your dog (face) and then moves to another or the whole body this information is critical to help your vet.
  • DO NOT put your hands near your dog’s mouth he will not swallow his tongue.  Dogs often bite and chomp their jaws when they seize and if you put your hands near his mouth you are likely to be bitten.
  • Be cautious, some dogs can suffer from aggression during seizures.
  • He may also be oblivious to you, which is normal during most seizures.
  • If the seizure lasts more than 3 minutes you may need to monitor his temperature, rectally.  A normal temperature for a dog is about 100-102.5.  Seizures can cause your dog’s temperature to rise.  Any temperature over 103 is considered a fever, and temperatures over 106 can cause brain damage and lead to death.

What to Do Post Seizure

  • Write down the information that you have complied so you can share it with your vet.
  • Contact your veterinarian and make an appointment.
  • Keep a seizure log so you know exactly when, and how long each episode lasted.
  • You may need to restrict food for 4 hours or so prior to blood work to get the best results.  However do not stop any medications and if in doubt ask your vet!

Preparing for More

  • Make sure your vets phone number is near.
  • Shut doors that lead to stairways or other areas that might injure your dog during a seizure.
  • Keep your stop watch, thermometer, and video cam in a central locale.
  • If your veterinarian prescribes emergency medications make sure they are easily located and that you are comfortable administering them.
  • Know where the nearest emergency veterinary hospital is and how long it takes to get there.  Do a trial drive by to ensure you know exactly where it is!

I have had a traumatic day, hoping that this will be an isolated event.  However, I know now that I must prepare myself, my family and my dog for the probability of more seizures on the horizon.  Knowledge is power and it is the one thing I can arm myself with to make sure that things go as smoothly as possible.  I definitely end the day having much more empathy for anyone else that has ever had to suffer from this frightening event and I hope that this information will help to empower anyone else that is unfortunate enough to need the information!

For more information I found this article very informative and it was written by a veterinary Neurologist.  http://www.canine-epilepsy.net/basics/basics_index.html

 

Save

Start Calming Down Your Over Excited Dogs Today!

Your First Lesson’s FREE:

Sign up below and we’ll email you your first “Training For Calm” lesson to your inbox in the next 5 minutes.

Comments

  1. I am so sorry to hear about your dog. I hope he’ll get better.

    [Reply]

  2. Jana Rade says:

    For what it’s worth, I have a several friends who had great results eliminating seizures with TCVM (Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine) approach.

    [Reply]

    Mel Reply:

    What is the TCVM approach. My mom’s keeshond had very bad seizures. Medication did not help very much. Anything to do would be greatly appreciated.

    [Reply]

    Martha Reply:

    Here is a link and you can google TCVM to find more info. There are standard vets who additionally have studied & practice TCVM. Their methods may seem simple, but many have seen amazing results when nothing else worked. 🙂

    [Reply]

    Doni Reply:

    Hi please give me information about TCVM

    Anne Botwin Reply:

    Mel,
    I credit TCVM, improved nutrition (including eliminating all glutens), and a HUMAN anti-seizure medication for helping my dog become seizure-free. I am convinced that excellent nutrition plays a major role (see my previous post.) My dog’s seizures were frequent, but mild. Tell your mom that what worked for my dog was l)eliminating glutens from his diet, 2)providing a high-protein kibble (protein is the 1st ingredient), 3)add canine vitamins and fresh protein and veggies, and 4)try a HUMAN anti-seizure medication, prescribed by her vet, such as Zonisamide, which will not damage her dog’s liver and kidneys. The website Epi Guardian Angels was also very helpful to me.

    [Reply]

  3. Jill says:

    I have read that if a dog is seizing, to press and hold the spot below their nose and above their lip. I hope your dog is better.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I too have heard this, it is an acupressure site, just be careful not to get bitten!

    [Reply]

  4. Bill Barnard says:

    Thanks for the information. I have a “pup’ 1yr. 3 mos. Glad to get this kind of info. Thanks Thanks…..Bill@BarnardClockShop…..

    [Reply]

  5. Darlene Tanner says:

    I have a dog who has had seizures for the last 5yrs since she was 2 she started having her 1st 1 when she was in labor it has been extremly hard dealing w & although I know & do most of what u said I have never considered video taping it & think that is a very good idea thanks for that! Because everytime we get to the vet when she has long 1’s she usually stops as were pulling in almost like she know its quite frusterating.

    [Reply]

  6. Mark says:

    The vet will want to study your dog overnight after a seizure, and you are correct they want to know where, when, how the seizure started. The medicines they like to prescribe for seizure disorders are extremely hard on the dogs’ liver and kidneys, so I advise a long talk with your vet depending on the age of the dog. My wife and I were rescued by a wonderful dog that seized the day we decided to keep her and I will never forget how that felt. But she lived a long wonderful 14 years with us after that first seizure.

    [Reply]

  7. Mel says:

    Hope your dog is okay now!

    When he was 8 years old, my Sheltie Duncan had something I thought was a seizure. He flopped over on one side and could not get up however he struggled; his pupils dilated and his eyes twitched back and forth rapidly. I wrapped him tightly in a blanket so he couldn’t hurt himself and rushed him to the emergency vet. I was told that although the symptoms could be similar, Duncan wasn’t having a seizure but a “vestibular attack.” Basically it means he could not find the horizon and therefore could not balance himself. Because he could not tell which direction was “up” he could neither stand nor lap water. His struggling was due to the fact that he wanted to stand but couldn’t figure out how to get up. Vestibular attacks, I was told, are not uncommon in older dogs. They are not as harmful or life-threatening as seizures, but it’s hard to tell them apart sometimes. The biggest danger to a dog during a vestibular attack is accidental injury during his thrashing, so he should be confined; the second danger is dehydration, because in his panic he will drool and not be able to replace the water he loses. You have your choice: either take him to an emergency vet where he will be sedated and given IV fluids; other than that, there’s little to be done. Vestibular attacks can last for several hours. If you opt to keep him at home, he should be given a dose of dramamine consistent with his body weight; this should calm him somewhat. The only way to hydrate him is to frequently smear water on his mouth where he will be able to lick it off.

    In many ways the treatment for vestibular attack is opposite from treatment for a seizure, so it’s important to know which is which.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    That is true about vestibular attacks!! And another reason to hopefully video tape and help your vet with diagnosis! Good point!

    [Reply]

    mike Reply:

    this sounds like what my 12yr old min. schnauzer had a few hours ago she seems ok now thanx for the info

    [Reply]

  8. Anne Botwin says:

    I have a miniature poodle who used to have mild 3-4 minute seizures(clenched muscles without loss of consciousness)up to 2x per week . He has been seizure-free for well over a year now. We first tried Potassium Bromide (which only made him ravenous)and Phenobarbital (which can cause liver damage)with disappointing results. We then tried adding a human anti-convulsive medication (Felbamate– very expensive!)to the Phenobarb, which did seem to help a bit more. We also discovered he had very low thyroid levels and started him on Soloxine, but nothing seemed to STOP the seizures.
    Thankfully, another dog owner told me about the website Epi Guardian Angels, a great eye-opener which started me doing some serious research on the web into the causes of epilepsy in both dogs and people. Your dog may respond differently, but I am a FIRM believer that your dog’s nutrition plays a huge role in combination with a HUMAN anti-seizure medication
    .
    Here is what has worked for my dog: On my own, I completely eliminated ALL glutens (wheat, corn, etc.) from his diet and saw an immediate improvement from 2 seizures a week to one every 2 weeks! With the help of 2 vets (one traditional and the other using traditional Chinese veterinary medicine) I replaced the Felbamate with a different human anti-convulsive, Zonisamide (which worked much better and costs much less),added a daily vitamin supplement and more protein and veggies to my dog’s diet (liver, mackerel, carrots, celery, etc.) This took some time, but he has now been weaned off the Chinese herbs and the Phenobarb completely and his liver enzymes have returned to normal, but his seizures have STOPPED. My advice to you: Improve your dog’s nutrition, work with your vet, and Don’t Give Up!

    [Reply]

    sallie macy Reply:

    what vitamin did you give? we have a rescue min. poodle age5-8, who had her first nite time 2 min. seizure. observing right now,blood work was all normal. she has had 2 in 10 days thanks

    [Reply]

    Anne Botwin Reply:

    Hi Sallie,
    The vitamins I use for Bailey are Nutrived O.F.A. Granules, distributed by VEDCO, Inc. Your vet may carry them or could order them for you. They come in a large tub, and I add one capful(approx. 2 Tb) per day to his dry kibble.

    Also, make SURE your dog’s kibble and any treats you give are completely grain-free (My holistic vet recommended Taste of the Wild kibble, and Bailey loves it.)

    I urge you NOT to start your dog on Phenobarbitol!! If improving her diet isn’t enough help, get an Rx from your vet for Zonisamide! The results I saw were really dramatic! My poodle weighs approx 19 lbs and needs 150 mg. twice a day to control his seizures. (He’s been seizure-free for about 2 yrs. now.) If your vet is skeptical, he should speak to my vet, who has researched the issue: Dr. Mark Kummer (Koomer):(360)671-3903

    Good luck and blessings upon you and your sweet dog. Let me know if I can be of any further help.
    Anne

    [Reply]

    sallie macy Reply:

    thank you-so far i am just documenting the seizures:9/28/11-10/31/11 every 9-10 days 2 minute nite time (11pm-1am)seizes with 10min-45 min post activity of restlessness. most recent was 14 days in between. feeding a gluten free/no added ingredients ALL NATURAl van patten diet,virgin coconut oil,nupro vitamins,filtered water,stainless steel bowls versus ceramic ones,fruits and veggies,vit. b’s, and no more ingestion of crab apples from my yard (she could eat them 5 or so at a time,all day long)!!! 30 minutes before bedtime-1mg liquid melatonin from natrol. i have been reading about Zonisamide!!! is it terribly expensive? could you share your email address with me? it would be great!!!-so doing all this it went from 10 days to 14 days. we were terribly dissappointed. what heart worm,flea prevention and do you do bordetella? sallie

    Chanda Reply:

    My 2.5yr old Choc. Lab just had his first seizure last night. He is still currently at the Emergency Vet Clinic. The vet is wanting us to take him to a Neurologist because she doesnt think his seizure was normal. It started @ 7:30pm with the actually seizing only lasting for about a minute. But after that he experienced heavy panting, diarrhea, vomiting, and had no response to sound or touch until 5:30am. Is that common for a dog to show no response until 10 hours after the seizure?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    No, that is why she wants you to see a neurologist! Go! Specialists are always worth it!

    [Reply]

    Anne Botwin Reply:

    Hi Minette,
    Sorry it’s taken me a while to respond. Bailey never showed ANY of the after-effects that you describe, and have I never heard about them from other dog owners I know whose dogs have seizures, so it seems likely to me the after-effects you describe really are abnormal. Follow your vet’s advice and see the neurologist (and be sure to ask questions about ALL possible underlying causes, treatments, and medications.)
    Good luck, Anne

    [Reply]

    Anne Botwin Reply:

    Hi Sallie,
    Sounds like you are doing a very thorough job–Good for you! Be patient and give it some time– it may take a while for your dog’s system to clear out. I’m so glad you switched to a gluten-free diet. I prefer Taste of the Wild to Patton’s food because of something I read about its processing, but I forget what now. (Why are you giving melatonin? Do you want to compare the vitamins & min. included in Nupro vs. Nutrived?)

    Zonisamide is much cheaper (about 50%?) than Felbamate, but more expensive than phenobarbital, which I would NEVER again use on any dog of mine. I think the Zonisamide costs us about $50 at Costco for 120 capsules (100mg) which lasts us about 2 months. Your prescription costs will vary depending on the dosage, how often you have to give it, and where you have it filled, so shop around.
    We do not have heartworms here in WA, but I do use Frontline Plus for fleas and ticks and have given bordatella shots without any negative side-effects. However, I have started to request a blood titer screening before giving Bailey any common booster vaccinations. Bailey often still has immunity, so we can skip that vaccination for a year. (Like you, I scrutinize every little thing… just in case!)
    Keep on making your records and check them a few months at a time– I kept records for about 3 years! If you want, you can but please remember, I am not a vet!
    Continued good luck to you and (what is her Name??) Anne

    [Reply]

    cindy Reply:

    I recently started my dog on phenabarbital after she had a cluster of 5 seizures withing a 30 minute time span. I held off for a long time trying diet change, easesure, fish oil but the seizures went from once a month two every two weeks to clusters. What type of Taste of the Wild do you use? All the ones I have seen have Rosemary Extract which is known to cause seizures. I am interested in the Zonisamide. I have not seen it mentioned on the Guardian Angel sight. Luckily when she had her cluster of 5 (she had had two before) I was home and able to rush her to the vets. I am in fear of what will happen if she has another cluster when I am not home. I pray the phenabarbital works. I know it is not good for their liver but that event made me desperate. She is currently on a good food but don’t believe it is gluten free, I will check that out. Did you ever use phenabarbital with any success? I wonder how the weaning process would be? I am so glad you have had good results. Is your dog still on the Zonisamide?

    [Reply]

    Anne Botwin Reply:

    Cindy, I am SO sad to hear about your dog’s cluster seizures (which can actually be life-threatening) so I’m very glad you took immediate action, even if it means using phenobarbital for now. Ask your vet about switching to Zonisamide (a human anti-convulsant which has been tested on dogs and proven to be safe and effective.)
    We saw an IMMEDIATE reduction in Bailey’s seizures– from 2 per week to once every two weeks, and it’s only gotten better since.)

    Every situation is different, and I am not a vet. I can only speak from my personal experience with Bailey (who also had one cluster seizure– very scarey!) For about a year, our vet tried all the commonly prescribed seizure meds (including phenobarb) but none of them made any noticeable difference. Bailey also had very low thyroid (which is OFTEN associated with seizures!) so we started him on Soloxine. You might want to ask your vet to run a THYROID TEST, just in case!

    What I can say with certainty is that for Bailey, switching to Zonisamide (plus continuing the Solxine, and starting him on a gluten-free diet) has worked wonders. We were able to gradually wean him off the phenobarbital as we increased the Zonisamide. This took about a year. Bailey has been completely seizure-free for about 3+ years now and his liver values have returned to normal– amazing!
    I hope and pray you get the same results with your dog.

  9. Nosihle says:

    My one month old puppy had one yesterday and I thought it had something to do with their mommy having died the day before yesterday. It was so scary and my instinct just told me to let him fit there and after that, I put him on my back with a blankie and he went straight to sleep too. I sure hope it doesn’t happen again.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I don’t believe it is normal at that age! I would contact your vet ASAP

    [Reply]

    MIKE Reply:

    Definately not normal. See your vet. 2 yrs is the normal mark of start for most dogs

    [Reply]

  10. Maryke says:

    My 9 year old Golden also suffers from seizures, but luckily since he came to live with me they have greatly diminished. I know excatly how you feel when you have to witness you dog in such a state, I was in tears the first time Teddy ‘fitted’ on me & I knew he had had seizures. i have discovered Teddy’s fits are stress related, so I give him homeopathy whenever I think he might be getting worked up (or if I’m stressed!) I have also used the acupressure point to help shorten the fit time. Now his fits consist of loss of power in his back legs & an ‘absent stare’ He knows when a fit is coming on & always comes over to me before he looses ‘conciousness’ I know I am lucky & have been able to identify trigger factors, have you considered the thought that the heat combined with sharing your bed may have been a trigger? People who suffer from epilepsy are very heat sensitive. I hope that you & your dog are now doing well.

    [Reply]

  11. Georgia says:

    Our Vet put my 5lb Chi’chi on Phenobarbital. I don’t like the drug but he has had no more seizures. I am afraid he won’t last as long as he could
    otherwise. Thanks for any other good medical suggestions.
    Georgia

    [Reply]

  12. Nancy says:

    My Stafordshire Terrior who is now 4 years old started having some sort of seizure after we had a chip implanted in her. It appears to look more like Parkinsons where her head shakes. She is fully concious and is able to walk and wag her tail. They last a few minutes and then go away.
    My vet thought she was having epilepsy possibly, but he has never witnessed it to see what transpires during one of Baileys episodes. Recording it is a great idea so I can show the vet next time. Has anyone else had this experience with their dogs? Of course its of concern as at first I thought she was having a stroke, or something, but going on three years, they are sporatic and I am unable to tell what brings them on. She is sometimes sleeping, and othertimes in her normal routine when they hit.
    Thank you in advance for any insite.

    [Reply]

    Amanda Reply:

    look up “idiopathic head bobbing syndrome”. My golden had this. It is often mistaken for a focal seizure.

    [Reply]

  13. Terri B says:

    I have an Akita, Keeshound, Collie, Chow, mix that has epilepsy since he was like 3 months old, I also lost a Chow/Elkhound mix to brain tumor that caused seizures, so I know what you went through. You do feel so helpless. My vet tells me and I’ve read up, from people who’ve had seizures, that the patient has no knowledge of what’s going on and feels no pain from it. I found that comforting to know, since in the case of the dog with the tumor, it seemed her expression during the seizures, was one of pleading for me to make it stop and fear. Thankfully in the case of my Akita mix, his phenobarbitol seems to mostly keep the seizures under control. My vet told me that there are no lasting effects, given that we can minimize the length of any seizures he’s having, which I also found comforting. He did not go in to as great of detail as you have though with the causes of the seizures, so I very much appreciate your information and will look into it further. He only told me that because of how young he was when they started and the fact that he didn’t outgrow them, that it’s a standard case of epilepsy such as humans have.

    I wish you much luck in managing your babies seizures and again appreciate your information,
    Terri

    [Reply]

  14. Laurie Siederman says:

    So Sorry about your dog. I know it hurts me when my dog has anything wrong. Can you tell me if there is a characteristic of seizures that involves the following symptoms;(the dog is a male shih tsu about 9 or 10 years old) lip curling, eyes rolled back,extremely aggressive, biting and charging at anyone near him. He does not seem to recognize me or respond to any voice commands. This behavior erupts without warning and he continues to wag his tail during the event. It is especially scary when I try to remove his leash or put him in or out of the car although he is fine once he settles in. They last a few minutes and he usually goes to his bed and sleeps afterward. I adopted him 14 months ago when the former owner said they may euthanize him since he became “nippy” with their toddler and were moving.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    aggression can be a sign of seizures, it is often called Rage Syndrome. Get him into your vet and have him checked out!! Better safe than sorry!

    [Reply]

  15. Karla says:

    My cocker-schnauzer cross suffered from periodic seizures the last four or five years of his life. Generally they happened in the middle of the night and his whole body would thrash wildly. There was drooling and loss of bladder control. It seemed like the seizures went on forever, though they only lasted a few minutes. He would pace aimlessly, totally disoriented for a while afterward. Then he would be totally exhausted. Although he was put on medication, we never knew when it would happen again and there was never a pattern. Needless to say, when seizures happened, it was traumatic for both of us.

    [Reply]

    Anne Botwin Reply:

    Karla, I am so saddened to hear how traumatic your dog’s seizures have been for you. Have you asked your vet for a HUMAN anti-seizure medication, like Zonisamide? Although my dog’s seizures were much less violent, this drug (plus much better nutrition)has really helped. His seizures have stopped for well over a year now. (See my previous post.) I hope you can find a solution that helps you and your dog.

    [Reply]

    Deana Reply:

    Karla, have you continued to have success? My dog is 8, a poodle mix, and we all of a sudden had 2 today. Both occurred while sleeping then followed by the aimless wandering. Vet appt is tomorrow so I’m trying to get all the info I can.

    [Reply]

    Karla Gilbert Reply:

    I lost my dog to cancer almost 3 years ago. He made it to his 12th birthday.

    Sambo, too, was about 8 years old when the seizures started. He had many allergies and had been allergy tested. My holistic vet tried many things for the seizures. Diet change, homotox remedies, medications i’ve forgotten, etc. Sambo’s seizures were so sporatic we could find no pattern, other than they happened at night when he was sound asleep. The vet indicated that was common and that dogs are more apt to “keep it together” when they are awake and active. When there were 2 seizures in less than one 24 hour period, one during the day time, we started phenobarbital. It would be hard to say if it helped or not. I did learn, after the daytime seizure, that I needed to keep waterproof pads under my couch covers on any furniture where he slept, just to be safe (and for quick clean up.) Since Sambo slept on the bed with me, I also had a pad where he slept and that did help with the cleaning up on more than one occasion.

    I wish you and your furry companion good luck, Deana. Hopefully there has been some new development in Vet Science in the past 3 years.

    [Reply]

  16. Nancy Lee says:

    I can imagine how you must have felt, experiencing your baby’s dilemma
    but you handled the situation beautifully (much better than I could have).
    I am so glad your dog is doing okay and I thank you so much for sharing this important information. I just copied, pasted and printed your most touching and informative entry and I will pray to St. Francis for Nix as I do every night for all of our dearly loved animals. God bless!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Thank you so much! Your post brought a tear to my eye! Much appreciated!!

    [Reply]

  17. Sharon G Pfeiffer says:

    I certainly sympathize with you and your dog. We had a loveable, Large-very large, German Shorthair Pointer, and out of the blue one night he seized, a Grand Mal, and I thought he was choking so guess where my hand went, luckily I did not get bit. From all I’ve heard it was classic and he continued to have them til the time we put him to sleep 5 years later at age 8 1/2 years. It was determine he had a brain tumor. I still miss him a lot and losing him was a horrible expeience. SHA

    [Reply]

  18. Rina says:

    My vet recommended GABA which helps a lot. We also give him fish oil and up GABA for a few days after she had an episode.

    [Reply]

  19. Deidrah says:

    My sheltie just started having seizures last summer. They always seem to last forever but in reality they are usually just a couple of minutes and are characterized by a loss of coordination and she acts almost panicked while they are happening. She likes to be with me but then afterwards she will usually go to her crate and lie down for a while. Does anyone know if food allergies can cause this? Twice she had a seizure after eating cooked chicken livers but it was almost immediately after, not enough time for them to digest. My vet does not seem worried about them and has not suggested blood work or anything. Should I maybe look for a new vet? We moved here a year ago and he is the closest but I do wonder. Thanks.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Seeking a second opinion is never a bad road! If you aren’t satisfied try someone else!

    [Reply]

    Anne Botwin Reply:

    My dog had exactly the same type of seizures and post-seizure behavior for years! I recommend you ask your vet check your dog’s thyroid levels: there is a strong correlation between mild seizures and low thyroid. I have become convinced that food allergies DO play a role in mild seizures like your Sheltie’s, because when I removed ALL glutens (wheat, corn, rice, etc.) from my dog’s diet, Bailey went from having seizures 2x/week to once every 2 weeks almost immediately! (Check out the website Epi Guardian Angels for more info.) Unfortunately, I have not met any vets who seem well-informed about nutrition and allergies until I consulted with a holistic vet who practices TCVM. I added more protein, extra vitamins, and fresh veggies to his daily diet at her suggestion. Then my regular vet learned about a new HUMAN anti-seizure medication (Zonisamide)deemed safe for dogs. With all these interventions working together, my dog has been completely seizure-free for over a year now! (See my previous post.) Good luck on your quest for a better vet.

    [Reply]

  20. my neigbor has a dog name otto.i am trying my best to spell my best.i think he is eight year’s old.i think i’m not sure.but he been getting them.whate schould she do.

    [Reply]

  21. Diane says:

    My male weimaraner began having grand mal seizures when he was about 8 years old. He passed away in April at the age of 10.5 years from another problem. His seizures typically lasted about a minute to two minutes. If you put an ice pack on the back of the dog from around the shoulders back, it lessens the duration of the seizure. He would lose control of his bowels and bladder and often bite his tongue. Poor guy was worn out for about a day. He was also famished afterward and I read that having a grand mal seizure burns enough energy as if he had run a marathon. So we gave him honey, and ice cream immediately afterward as soon as he was aware enough to eat. That was followed by a large bowl of his food. He was always ravenous afterwards. He also seemed disoriented and did not know who we were for about an hour afterward and would pace nervously. Yes, the first seizure is traumatizing as we thought he might die. But he had seizures up to twice or three times a week – and some times he would go a couple of weeks without them. One remedy that often works is potassium bromide. It can greatly reduce the frequency of seizures. Unfortunately for our dog, it made him so out of it – almost drunk like, that he could barely function. So we just dealt with the seizures. We had him on some other meds, but am not sure they helped at all. Sometimes a neurologist can pinpoint the cause. In our case the cause was never determined.

    [Reply]

  22. Shari says:

    Thanks so much for sharing this important information! For people, any seizure lasting over 3 minutes is an emergency situation. I am surprised that for a dog it is 5 minutes!

    [Reply]

  23. Kathie says:

    I had a dog that started having seizures when she was 4years old I had her mother she had a brother he was dropped and hit on his head he had them too but he didn’t live as long as my dog Poohbear. One day she had 14 of them I thought I was going to lose her but my vet kept her a couple of days and kept her doped up. She came through it she to some meds for eptilepsi I may have spelled it wrong she had to take them twice a day she lived to be 14 in our years and I sure do miss her I have a A.K.C. mini Schnauzer but she thinks she is human not a dog. I had papered mother and father their both dead he lived 14 years the mother 12 years they become like your kids not pets it is hard when they have things wrong Mylady has lost the site in one eye and is losing the other eye she is 10 years old

    [Reply]

  24. Dane wilson says:

    Thankyou for sharing. Power is knowledge
    Hope you and your dog are ok now.

    [Reply]

  25. M W Law says:

    Is there nothing to do beside watching, timing, taking records and eliminate surroundings of possible danger?

    Anything like cover up with blanket, open window, turn on air con,
    spray with air mist water ?????

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    No blankets, unless it is to protect the dog from rolling away or being injured. Seizures can already increase their temperature to a dangerous level. So monitor their temp.

    I would not recommend water spray! I would simply carefully talk to and stroke them while timing.

    You may open a window or turn on some air if you would like, I am sure that would not do any damage.

    Just make sure your dog is safe!

    [Reply]

    Anne Botwin Reply:

    Talk soothingly to your dog and try putting an ice pack on your dog’s neck or back to see if that helps.

    [Reply]

  26. Debbie says:

    Thank you so much for this informative info. it’s so good for people to learn and understand these key points about seizures.
    I am so sorry that your “baby” is going through this. I know just how you feel. My sweet golden retriever, “Marley” just passed away in March. (she had her name way before the book and movie came out) She had been having seizures for the last two years of her life. She really fought to stay with me, and she was amazing how well she accepted her situation. (a whole heck of a lot better than me!) Her hearing and her sight were getting worse as time went on, so I stayed close to her and my touch seemed to help guide her to me, and what I wanted her to do.
    Whenever she had her seizures. i just got down on the floor with her and stroked the back of her head and down her back talking softly to her telling her that “I am right here” and that she will be OK, and that I love her. I just stayed there with her until she came out of it… But unlike your dog, she was very restless after her seizure, and would want to walk all around for the next 10 to 15 minutes. So I would go outside with her and walk around with her (keeping her safe) until she settled down.
    I rescued Marley when she was 7 1/2 years old. I miss her so very much!!! She was an such an “angel” and “pure blessing” in my life!!! Marley was 15 1/2 years old when she passed. She will forever be with me, and in my heart.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    You are the angel to take in a 7.5 year old and love her like you did!! She was one lucky dog! And, I know what you mean, it is hard to watch your “child” suffer! He too is my angel and I love him with all of my heart!

    [Reply]

  27. Laura says:

    I have a Jack Russell Terrier mix. He ran away for about 3 weeks when he was about 6 to 9 mths old. About 1 month after I got him back he started having seizures. He is now 4 1/2 yrs old. He continues to have seizures. Sometimes he has cluster seizures. 3 or 4 back to back. Sometimes they are so bad if he is standing it will throw him to the ground then pick him back up & throw him back down again. We have to pick him up & hold him fairly tight to keep him from getting hurt. Sometimes we can go weeks without them & sometimes he might have a couple of weeks. The Vet thinks he might have a brain tumor. He has been on meds that they give humans for seizures. Its a controlled substance. Vet says this 20lb dog takes enough meds in a day to knock at a 22 yr old human. But if we lower the meds he has them more often. The only thing we can do is take care of him while he is having one. Give him his 2 1/2 pills a day on as close as a strict time table as possible. And give him the best life we can. We know someday he will probably go into one & it will take his life. So we just love him as much as we can & give him the best life we can. It is quite scary to see part of your family go through such a thing.

    [Reply]

  28. Theresa says:

    My dog Mojo has had seizures for the last 4 years. His appear two different ways. Some of his siezure look like you hit a pause button on the TV and he completely freezes in place (standing or laying down), his jaw clinches shut, he drools and he toppels over. These last about 5-10 min for him. The other type he will lay down no matter what he is doing and you see his jaw clinch, drooling and the rest of his boby clinches up so tight that all four legs begin to pull up above his head and butt. These appear to be the most pain full and taxing on him and last about 10 min. The vet now has him on phenobarbital due to his intense and frequent siezures and it has drastically reduced them. He use to have them twice a month and now I only see them a couple times a year. His trigger seems to be stress or over excitment.

    [Reply]

    Anne Botwin Reply:

    Theresa,
    Are you aware that phenobarbital can be very damaging to Mojo’s liver and kidneys over time? Ask your vet about a HUMAN anti-seizure medication, such as Zonisamide. Studies have shown it to be safe for canines and it will not damage to your dog’s organs. You can then wean him off phenobarb very, very gradually. Along with improved nutrition, Zonisamide has helped my dog become seizure-free!
    Also, are you aware that seizures lasting more than 5 minutes can be life-threatening? I am so glad they are not occurring so frequently, but I would take my dog to an emergency clinic if he had a seizure lasting over 5 minutes.

    [Reply]

    Peggy Powell Reply:

    I have an Otterhound with similar symptoms. He has been seizing for several years now, though they are infrequent. My vet diagnosed low blood sugar from stress. It would happen if I changed his diet or if he was frightened by thunderstorms and the like. The cure to bring him out of it was to force corn syrup or honey into his mouth. Unfortunately, I have the only dog in the world who doesn’t like sugar.
    Nanuu would always try to head for the basement when they were coming on but he has fallen down the stairs during one so we always try to catch him first. He stands shaking and drooling, all muscles seized right up. He has only fallen over if he’s banged into something that caused him to lose his balance. Once the sugar kicks in and he can move again we get him right outside because he will have to pee immediately. He is weak for awhile but at least can move on his own. We add corn syrup to his food for a couple of meals to make sure his levels stay up after it happens and never travel without taking some with us.
    Just a suggestion to what may be the cause in your case.
    Food can definitely cause reactions. Nanuu has a really high metabolism and only a few foods are tolerated by him, unfortunately none of them are the really good brands. He didn’t gain weight until he hit 7 which is why I kept trying new types. My vet finally told me to stop.

    [Reply]

  29. Jana Rade says:

    @Mel

    I tried replied directly but it didn’t go through twice. Didn’t go through here either, I guess the comments don’t allow links.

    As the long name indicates, it is based on Traditional Chinese Medicine. It is really a holistic approach, rooted in Eastern philosophy.

    In fact, some holistic vets include it in their tool box. Some modern vets also include it in what it’s called integrative medicine approach.

    It involves different type of diagnostic, food therapy, herbal therapy and acupuncture.

    I have a few articles on the subject on my blog, as we also include TCVM in Jasmine’s health care. It’s under Alternative Solutions in the Table of Contents.

    You can also visit a related dog forum, the link to that is under Cool Stuff: Dog Community
    it has several seizures related threads.
    You want to look for responses by calliecritturs

    [Reply]

  30. Gilliane says:

    Hi
    first i am so sorry that your little baby is prone to this horrible thing.

    I just got this email reg seizures and i started getting worried.
    I have a 1 1/2 year old pom and 1 week ago i just noticed that his head started shaking and his upper body for maybe 1 min or less.then it stopped as suddenly as it has started.he started barking and was back to his normal self again.

    after some time i noticed that he has been chewing a pen to pieces so i thought maybe he swallowed a piece and it triggered the shaking ..and just before the shaking started i was removing his t shirt i thought maybe he just got the shivers from the sudden cold after his t shirt was removed.

    nothing happened since then..so is it seizure or not??

    please let me know what you think cause i have never seen a dog having seizure before and i dont know how it looks like.
    also if it was seizure do you think that the toxin in the pen caused it and if so is it just a one time thing or should i take him to his vet.
    i will definitely talk to his vet about it when i go see him for his annual shot soon
    but please if u can help informing me i would be more at peace.

    thks a lot

    [Reply]

    Josh Reply:

    Have you found out anything about your dog and this “cold seizure”? My dog did it the other day when we were staying in Idaho in a cold room, and then today when it was cold in the house. I haven’t heard back from my vet yet but am always nervous about everything.

    [Reply]

    gilliane Reply:

    Hi Josh
    No unfortunately i did not find anything about it cause it was only a one time thing and it never happened again..so i think either it was the cold or the toxin in the pen and anyway I have been taking extra precaution of not exposing him to the cold and not leaving anything with toxic stuff within his reach.
    Always checking everything when I am not with him in the same room.
    Sorry for not being able to help.
    If you do find something please let me know cause it’s always good to be on the alert.
    Hope your vet can help

    [Reply]

  31. Elden says:

    So nice to see that I am not alone in trying to deal with my 3 & 1/2 year old puggle’s (pug/beagle cross) seizures. Roscoe’s first seizure when he was about one year was likely a grand mal in the middle of the night in my bedroom. Freaked me right out. Rigid legs, clenched jaw, rolled eyes and drooling foul smelling bile. He has about two or three a year at the most and they occur any time of the day or night and usually last two to three minutes. I just stay with him, talking calmly and stroking and petting him. Telling him I’m there for him. Afterwards he has minor tics or body shudders occuring every 30 seconds or so for awhile till he falls asleep again. My vet says to monitor and keep records but likely isn’t too serious now. As he gets older?? We are trying different food now and he is on hypo allergenic food (for a different reason, (periodic groin skin rash)and hasn’t seized since. I too believe it is all in the nutrition (reluctant to do drugs) and will continue to experiment. Nice tip on the holistic food and chinese medicine. Thanks!

    [Reply]

  32. suzanne goodson says:

    My dog has frequent seizures for 6 years. It still upsets me so much to watch her. I have her on 3 anti-seizure medications. It’s very difficult being the Mom, and there’s nothing i can do. 🙁

    [Reply]

  33. ingrid simke says:

    My 11 1/2 year old border collie had his first and only seizure 3 weeks
    ago, when we were on a pet therapy visit to our local hospital. He fell over, and couldn’t get up. It was like his rear went out. A nurse called for a wheelchair. I placed him on it, and we took him to my car. I took him right to the vet…blood work and heart and lungs were fine. No repeat. Idiopathic? He continues to do pet therapy, and is his old, wonderful self. We love Luke so much. He is a gentle soul, who we adopted from our local shelter 7 years ago. He was the first dog we had in 25 years…we were always , and still are cat lovers. So now we have 2 dogs, 3 cats, and foster kittens year round.

    [Reply]

  34. Melena says:

    My Yorkie, Linus, had his first seizure last Wednesday, then one at 3am Monday morning, 4pm Monday afternoon and 6pm Monday night. He’s a rescue, so we’re not sure how old he is, but around 10. We’ve had him 4yrs.

    A friend of mine had a JR the same weight and had some phenobarb—she brought me some tonight and I gave it to him (we’re going to the vet first thing tomorrow)

    I HATE the phenobarb. He’s like a totally different dog. I had to literally put his face in his bowl so he could find it. He was so confused outside, he didn’t know where to go. I hate it.

    Thank you for this post–it has helped me a lot to know what info to tell my vet and ask my vet.

    [Reply]

  35. Melena says:

    Is there a group/discussion board anywhere that you can post/discuss your dogs’ condition?

    I checked the epi guardian angels site, but I would like to post Linus’ behavior and see if anyone else had this happen when they first started on the phenobarb.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    My best advice is to talk to your vet. Although other owners may have had similar experiences or taut information or cures, only your vet has been to veterinary school and is knowledgeable about drugs, side effects and new drugs that may be offered. Call and talk on the phone or make an appointment.

    Phenobarb often makes dogs act “drunk” and disoriented when they begin to take it, but this usually diminishes after about 2 weeks when it builds up in their system.

    If you think the dose is too much or some of the side effects are not normal, only a veterinarian can really help you get Linus’ dose correct!

    [Reply]

  36. Yvonne says:

    I’m very sorry to hear about your dog and I hope the seizures do not continue.

    We had noticed that our dog (long haired chih) had been having some rapid breathing spells and at the same time he had also developed a cough. Concerned he might have heartworms I took him to the vet this past Tuesday (8/9/11). The heartworm test came back negative but she did diagnose him with a heart murmur. She said that on a scale of 1-6 with 6 being the worse he was at about a 5. This broke my heart as Courage has been a part of our family for just over 10 years. The vet went on to ask me if he’s had seizures and I had told her no. I asked her if he was hurting when he had his breathing spells but she said no, just that he was probably uncomfortable and the best thing we could do was just try to soothe him and calm him down to slow his breathing. I asked her if we should consider putting him down and she said not yet, she figured that he had another 6 months to a year and recommended a medication we give him to help the blood flow to his heart.

    We purchased the medicine for him and have managed to get it in him the last few days.

    Courage sleeps with my husband and I and this morning my husband woke up and I could hear him calling Courage’s name; naturally I became alert and my husband told me that he thought something was wrong. I turned on the lamp and looked to where he was lying and there he was on the bed lying in his body fluids not moving at all. In my heart I knew he had passed away during the night and we weren’t there to see him through. His eyes were wide open and his tongue was hanging out to the side. My immediate reaction was to grab him and hold him and just cry. I held him and rocked him for about 5 minutes before I noticed his eyes slightly move. Then I noticed he had been taking slow, steady breaths. I held him and loved him for at least a good half hour before laying him back down on the bed (of course we had changed the sheets). He didn’t want to be near anyone as he kept moving away.

    A little bit later he jumped off the bed and went and relieved his bowels in our loft – Courage is potty trained and when this happened I knew it was because something is very wrong. A little bit later I asked him if he wanted to ‘Go Potty’ – his favorite words to hear and he perked up a little bit. While we were going down the stairs I did notice that he was bumping into the wall a little bit. As he was outside taking care of his business I noticed that it must have gotten to be too much for him because he used the restroom and then lay right down instead of coming to the door as usual.

    I got him back in the house and carried him up the stairs and laid him on the floor on one of his blankets. I guess right now he wants to do things his way because he got off the blanket and curled up on the floor on the side of the bed. I did note that when he first got up off the blanket to move he was almost stumbling. As I’m typing this right now he is just lying down curled up in a ball on the floor. I’ve already left a message to speak with the vet but she won’t be in until 8am. I don’t want Courage to be miserable and I definitely don’t want the boys to have to see him go through this – I have 3 boys that are 14, 12 & 9. Right now I just really don’t know what to do.

    [Reply]

    Peggy Powell Reply:

    So sorry to read your post. I gather the vet said it was time. Unfortunately we lose our furry babies way to soon to the rainbow bridge.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Actually, it turns out that he has meningitis so he is on prednisone and phenobarbital and hasn’t had a seizure since! We welcome his 12th birthday next month! He is at my feet as I write this 🙂

    [Reply]

    Peggy Powell Reply:

    You’ve made my day. Thank you so much for replying.

  37. DILMA says:

    WHEN MY DOG GOT A SEIZURES I JUST GIVE HER HONEY AND BEFORE I COUNT TO 6 SHE GET UP AND GO TO PLAY AGAIN!! SO NEXT TIME TRY IT MAYBE IS LOW SUGAR . GOOD LUCK.

    [Reply]

  38. Penni says:

    My three year old lab, I think had her first seizure tonight. she was shaking her back left leg uncontrolably for about thirty seconds, during this time she was looking right at me as if trying to tell me, Mommy make it stop. I plan on calling the vet tomorrow. She is acting fine now and appears to be comfortably resting. Not sure if this could have been brought on by stress, but we just had five house guests that left last night and I know the week that they stayed was stressful on my dog. Advice would be appreciated…..

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Usually a seizure affects a whole side of the body or the whole body as a general rule. Sometimes injuries and muscle spasms affect a leg or other body part like that, but as i always do…I would recommend calling your vet and having it checked out. Even if it is something else, it could be something else serious and it is better safe than sorry…that is my theory with my dogs!

    [Reply]

  39. Adri says:

    Hello all, my three year old lab had his fourth seizure last night. The third one was about a week ago, and his First and second happened in the spring. I took him to the vet when he first started seizing to get him tested for epilepsy and it came back negative. The vet told me he was perfectly normal… So now that the seizing has started again i have no clue what’s wrong. After Jacob had his first seizure he started getting droopy eye lids and behaving different,kinda lethargic on a monthly basis it would last for about a couple Ofdays then he would be back to normal. I really don’t have money to visit the vet again since I’m living on my own and working part time. what do you all recommend I do? I feel so helpless…

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    The only one to give you information on your own dog is your vet. No one else knows your dog and information given even out of the kindness of their heart could hurt your dog. Call your vet and see if you can just talk on the phone about what happened and what he recommends. As long as you have been there within the year, he should be willing to conference with you to some degree.

    [Reply]

  40. Sonja says:

    I know this was posted a while ago but I wanted to coment and just hope I’d get a response. My dog has reoccuring seizures and the vet won’t medicate him for it or help at all. He has one a week for a few weeks, then a few weeks off.
    I just wanted to know if anyone had any ideas of something that would help that I don’t have to get from a vet.
    Also, can you anyone tell me what happens as a cause of seizures(like problems that come from having multiple ones)? Everytime he has a seizure it takes him longer to have control of his limbs, will he just stop walking one day? Also is loss of bladder control(outside of episodes) common?

    I would really appriciate a reply.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Find a different vet! Only a vet can run test and give you the true information that you are seeking!

    [Reply]

    Anne Botwin Reply:

    My vet had a cautious approach at first too, and I know it is agony to just wait and see if the seizures stop. How many weeks has this been going on? (If it’s been a long time, I agree with Minette!)

    In the interim, though, it would not hurt to put your dog on a completely grain-free diet (including his kibble and any treats you may give.) I saw a dramatic improvement within 2 weeks of switching to Taste of the Wild and limiting treats to cheese or freeze-dried liver — from twice a week to once every two weeks.

    Ask your (new) vet about using a HUMAN anti-seizure medication, rather than phenobarbital. When I began giving my dog Zonisamide, his seizures became infrequent and then stopped completely… he’s been seizure-free going on 2 years now.

    [Reply]

  41. Miya says:

    My dog is a Shitzu. he is almost 12 and has had 8 legitimate seizures in the last 24 hours. He has a heart murmor pushing against his lungs, causing him to have trouble breathing, causing him to have seizures, causing his heart to swell. This is a problem and we are going to get medication for only $4 a month. Our vet said it would stop the seizures, and the murmor. The rest is in God hands. I will pray for oyu because my last dog died while having a seizure. So sorry…

    [Reply]

  42. Saul says:

    my dog had 8 seizures yesterday and i dont know whats causing it.he had the seizure when he ate egg ( not much ) about 10 after he had seizures but hes better

    [Reply]

  43. Samantha Watkins says:

    My dog had a litter of puppies and on of the 6 has seizures quite frequently for about 6minuets each episode his whole body reacts violently and hes only 3 weeks old is there anything further i can do to help this young puppy its quite upsetting knowing nothing and not what to do when hes in pain or trouble, i’m not home during the day so i don’t know how many times a day he has one, he gets them often and randomly. PLEASE i need to know what to do hes to young and i don’t want to put him down if it comes to that.

    [Reply]

  44. Sasha loves Taina says:

    Hii everyone, my maltese is 9 yrs old and for the past week, she’s been getting back to back seizures. First, she was getting them like 7 times a day but then it narrowed down to 3 a day but lasting less then one minute. She would first come to me for help, starts shaking in fear and then her legs and arms gets stiff. This will last less then one minute. We put her on phenobarbital but it has made her clumpsy and disoriented. I decided to stop giving her pheno before her body gets addicted to it but now am just scared to see her go through those frequent attacks. I need advice =(

    [Reply]

  45. Linda says:

    I have a 7 yr old German Shorthair/Lab mix, she started having seizures at about 1yr 1/2, her first I think was a Gran mal, she was really out of it,not sure how long, we were out doors and very upset,seemed like forever. Now every year in the Spring of the year she has 1 or 2 and do not see any the rest of the year. We have her on a Lamb and Rice dog food thru (Diamond) and it is free of wheat,soy, and corn. She just had a seizure last night, lasted about 30 min., but only for a short while did she seem unresponsive, we kept talking to her and holding her and petting her. She would move her eyes when we talked to her and would come out of it and go back in about 2 or 3 times, even walked around a little after one, but was kind of disoriented and then went into again, but why does this only happen in the Spring of the year, always at the end of Feb. or in March, this seems so odd. Vet said we shouldn’t put her on medication since she has only a few a year and it will change her personality so much and she won’t be the same happy dog. We did do a blood test after the very first seizure and it was ok, I am wondering if the dog food needs to be changed more, is the Lamb and Rice good and what about vitamins. Tally is almost human and very loving and caring would never even hurt a fly and beautiful, we don’t want to lose her, please let us know what any of you think from your experiences. Thank You, Linda

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I doubt it has anything to do with food.

    My dog is only on one phenobarb a day and it has helped we started with the high dose and he was drugged for a while but were able to decrease his dosage.

    I would go back to the vet or find another to do more tests! And, I would consider going on medications to help!

    [Reply]

    Michele Reply:

    My German shorthair started having seizures after switching his food to a lamb and rice dog food. Most dry dog food with lamb or other expensive meats also seem to have either salmon or fish of some sort in them. After several seizures , the running type and being diagnosed with epilepsy, starting phenobarbital, we found the dog to be allergic to most likely the lamb and perhaps the salmon in his food. We have since switched him to a chicken and brown rice dry food, his food has always been grain free, I myself am allergic to gluten. He has been seizure free and medication free now for nearly a year and a half.

    Interestingly enough, his family has no history of epilepsy, but when his full brother from same litter was switched to a lamb dog food he too developed epilepsy, with running seizures also. He is currently in the process of being weaned off from his medication after being switched back to a gluten free food and lamb free. He has been seizure free for nearly a month.

    My dog was 18 mos. when he had his seizures, sometimes as many as two a day, and his brother is 32 mos. when he started his seizures.

    [Reply]

  46. andrew says:

    SOME ONE PLEASE HELP, MY DOG GOT A SEIZUR AND I BROUGHT HIM TO THE VET IMMEDIETALY, THEY DO KNOW WHAT CAUSEED IT BUT DOES ANYONE KNOW IF THIS ISSUE HAPPENED WITH THEIR DOG, AND IF THEIR DOG SUVRIVED

    [Reply]

  47. Linda says:

    Andrew, My note is just above yours, my dog has 1 many be 2 seizures a year, some dogs have some everyday, it can either be Epilipsy, just like people, or can be from a head injury, infection or from many other things. Some dogs have seizures all their life and are just fine, others can have many seizures or Grand Mal and have to be on medication, my sister had a Siberian Husky that had such severe seizures he was on medication and he still had them and it did kill him, but don’t hear about as many dogs that have it that bad. I am sure your Vet will do some testing and let you know what is best for your dog, my Vet told us that since our dog doesn’t have but 1 year we might not want to put her on the very strong seizure meds because they change the dogs personality and walk around like a zombie, and not be the happy dog that they were. Let me know what the Vet said, I am sure everything will be ok, it is hard to see our kids go thru seizures, they are very scary.

    [Reply]

    andrew Reply:

    my dog is fine, his head isnt that stiff anymore and his eyes do not twich, but he is not eating, like barley anything, being that he dooes not digest (poo) but he does pee normally

    What should i give him to eat or what should i do?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Take him to the vet!!

    [Reply]

  48. Marina says:

    My lil pug just had a seizure last night and my daughter is texting me now that he just had another small one just a few moments ago. He’s been a healthy boy and never seen this but last night he foamed at the mouth and collapsed it was scary to see but when he came out of it he seemed a bit confused and started growling and then he did his normal barking and spinning around his tail and was like nothing happened after. I’m getting nervous since he had a small one just now, so, I’m going to make an appt with the vet and try to find out what is going on. Is there anything I should do until I can get him in to his dr to prevent or help him when he does have a seizure? are there any warning signs to watch out for??

    It’s harder for me since my daughter does have epilepsy and now my lil boy is having seizures… he use to bark before my daughter has a seizure and now no one noticed when he was having one until we heard him moaning 🙁

    thanks for your help!

    [Reply]

  49. Patrick says:

    My boy Dobby died just a couple years ago. He started having seizures and our vet put him on phenobarbital. It changed him totally and then finally killed him. He started gaining weight and having to pee a lot but our vet acted like that was normal. When his liver started to fail our vet couldn’t figure out what was wrong with him. We told him we wanted to take Dobby to the Univ of Mo small animal hospital to check him out and he kept telling us to wait another week. He never even told us that liver damage was a side effect of PB. We finally made Dobby an appt at the University and they diagnosed him within a minute and he died a few hours later. His little body (he was a Yorkie) was destroying itself. Liver problems that helped to cause lung and nervous system problems. IMO our vet was criminally incompetent. We’ve never been back. I wish someone could have told us about something like Zonisamide back then.

    [Reply]

  50. Mark says:

    Our dog, Bing, 11ish yr old Italian Greyhound, JUST had a seizure, as of 60 minutes ago. I had never seen a dog seize before and I just completely freaked the F out! I should start off saying I’m a caregiver for my disabled fiance who has epilepsy, but has non-convulsive seizures, anywhere from 3-7 times a week, until we started him on medication after 6 years of desperately trying to find an answer, doctor after doctor, etc etc…

    I thought I would have had my shit under control… but I just freaked out! After his seizure was done, I didn’t take my eyes off of him for the next 15 minutes, my fiance is looking after him right now, as I comb through Google and try desperately to find something similar to what just happened!! I’m, sadly, not entirely sure how long it lasted, he is normally in his blanket bed, and sometimes he digs at it, I recognized the sound and so I turned to check on him and it was happening, but if it had just started it was UNDER 2minutes, however, I cannot be sure how long it lasted.

    So, he had his seizure, convulsions, drooling *some of it frothing*, even urinated on himself. Once it seemed to have passed he just sat there for about a minute, as if he was completely oblivious to anything, then he suddenly snapped out of it and turned around looked at me and started wagging his tail… After about 10 seconds he was up and walking around like nothing had happened, he was acting a bit, “strange” IF that is even possible for an Italian Greyhound!

    So, his symptoms during the seizure were convulsions, drooling /partially frothy, jaw opening wide and almost closed, urination, disorientation, unaware to his surroundings, almost as if he wasn’t passed out during it. When he stopped convulsing he laid there for about 30 seconds completely out of it, I kept talking to him, then he turned around and looked at me and started wagging his tail. 10 Seconds later he jumped out of his bed and was walking around like nothing happened, but will NOT lay down, he is constantly walking around in circles, big and small, stopping and walking just like normal, but randomly loses his balance on his back left leg and falls over, but it is as if he doesn’t realize it… If he starts to stand still it’s almost as if he is almost drunk, like he can’t stand so he keeps walking to keep his balance and feels weird or the room is spinning so he won’t sit still…

    Calling the vet right now to set up an appointment and get EVERYTHING done that we possibly can, thank you everyone here for your help and advice, ANYONE with ANY other information PLEASE TELL ME!! Thank You again!

    ~ Mark

    [Reply]

  51. Anna says:

    I too have dealt with seizuring patients as a veterinary nurse, including a colleagues dog, whilst she too became very upset. Having now just experienced it with my own dog it brings a whole new light to what the owners experience. I felt calm during the seizure but I too went to pieces after he had recovered. My 5yr old cross breed is a very nervous dog and can become aggressive in certain situations including his seizure recovery where he became very aggressive towards me. Unfortunately his seizure occurred in the boot of my car and during his recovery had flung himself out onto the floor, having no lead attached it was vey difficult to do much as I couldn’t get hold of him, until he vision and properly returned and he could focus on me. I’m in the process of waiting for blood results.
    So I would like others to be aware of taking care during the seizure and during your dogs recovery,

    [Reply]

  52. Avery says:

    im 14 years old & ive had a seizure disorder my whole life until my parents bought me a pet poodle when i was 8 years old…i started to notice that my seizures had never come back & then one night when there was a full moon my poodle had his very first one. he gets them everytime theres a full moon & this has been going on for a year now. & tonight he had 4 in a row. when my parents arent home they tell me to just watch him. im really afraid he will die from this. is that even possible? …i just read this right now & it really did help & im sorry about your dog. im going through everything your going through too. this just cant be happening. i would rather me have them then have my dog suffer.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Avery

    I’m sorry for you and your dog as well.

    The only thing you can do is to stay calm and time how long they last.

    Take his temperature if you are worried.

    Move anything that he might bump into and just be there for him when he comes out of it.

    But always be careful not to get too close as some dogs can get aggressive because they are disoriented.

    If the seizure continues longer than a minute or two, you can take him to a vet.

    There are medications that keep my dog from having seizures. Since he has been on medication he has probably only had 3 seizures in the last year!

    [Reply]

  53. Bellebelle says:

    thank you for your stories… i have found so much information here. my 9 y/o maltese just started having seizures up to 5 mins long this year. BUT today was the first day she lost bowel control..

    the bloodwork keeps showing as normal, and the vet has been reluctant to put her on anything.
    she eats an organice , gluten free , holistic dog food, i believe , sensibites.
    But i am open to changing it … ANYTHING<<<
    I heard my other dog squealing at her.. as she lay there on her side… unable to move.. HER TOnGUE was white and ice cold… she took longer today to come out of it than any other.
    I'm determined & traumatized… I just don't want her to suffer, and of course want her to stay here with us !
    Please any more info on holistic vet medicine , nutrition…. is appreciated

    [Reply]

  54. suzanne says:

    my 14 year old bichon started taking seizure 5 months ago, she was put on potasium bromide…..she has taken about 1 focal seizure a month while on the neds.
    i noticed her breathing was getting labored, wheezing, now she coughs – hacking cough. The vet says she has congestive heart failure…..so meds for that and fluid pills. She still coughs. I think its the potasium bromide.
    last night i didnt give her the potasium and she slept trough the night no coughing.
    has anyone had this reaction????
    i’m so worried. she eats well, pees and poops, and is happy except for the wheezing and coughing……

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I have never heard of this. The heart and the nervous system are not really related.

    If in doubt I would seek a second opinion from another vet, namely a cardiologist.

    [Reply]

  55. Rachel says:

    My beloved Jasmine just turned 13 and had her first seizure last night. It was horrific, frightening and very, very scary. I thought she was simply having a stroke and passing before my eyes so I prepared for the worst. Thankfully a vet tech at the emergency told me it sounded like a seizure and she helped me calm down and respond accordingly. Since it was 2 a.m.and they told me there was a long wait…and her episode was not considered an emergency …I monitored her at home. My Mom, 70 years young…was an RN many years ago. She came over immediately after to check get vitals. All good. Took her first thing this morning to see vet, right now, no idea what caused this to happen to my darling. Waiting for blood results and keeping my two year old away from her to give her a break. Prayers welcome!

    [Reply]

  56. claudia says:

    my choclate lab harvey had his first fit 2 years ago when he was 2 when they increased the vet put hin on phenabarb low dose as his fits were mild jaw clenching siezen up couldnt walk but was always concious n wagging his tail eyes pleading whats happening it was afawl but i just soothed him n kept him calm he hasnt had one scince n is his lovley happy self but iam really worried now hearing about liver damage the vet wont give him the human epilepsy drug zonismide n wont take his blood as there seems to be nothing wrong with him im not happy about thisas dont want to wait untill its to late if his liver aint rite where could i get it n what dose would i give him

    they tell me its dangerous to stop the phenabarb any advice i love my boy n want to do the best 4 him thanks claudia from england

    [Reply]

  57. My Shep mix just had something that I thought was a seizure but now I’m not as sure. I looked out my window and saw his body arched, legs straight and stiff, he was backing up, and the other dogs were going crazy. I ran out to him his mouth was open and his tongue was hanging to the side. He was breathing rapidly (which doesn’t mean much cuz he’s a runner, as in he runs the length of my fence everyday for as long as you’ll let him). He was salivating pretty heavily which was different and his muscles were trembling. I pretty much thought Seizure at this point, not that he’d ever had one before. But he didn’t fall, I coaxed him into laying down, his mouth never clenched, he tried to lick away the saliva several times while he was laying down. His body remained stiff, legs stiff and unmoving, and his muscles trembled. He would attempt to get up but couldn’t, and I tried to keep him down, he would put his head in my lap, then take it out to try to lick the saliva again. At one point my other dogs were around him and I tried to shoo them away and he wagged his tag. My son came out to see and he wagged his tail again. I picked him up to carry him into the bathroom and he wiggled himself out of my arms, then did a leap/falling thing into the house. I got him into the bathroom and closed the door. He sat the entire time, muscles still stiff and trembling, legs still unbending. Rubbing his head against me. It ended in about 10 mins or so, but I wonder if it was a seizure because he didn’t really have any of the pre symptoms I’ve read about. He was his normal self until it happened. Then he never loss consciousness, he knew what was going on around him, he knew I was there, he wagged his tail. His legs didn’t do the moving or paddling and besides falling because his legs wouldn’t bend he didn’t really collapse, and he never clenched his jaw it remained open the entire time. It was like he was paralyzied for a while and then came out of it…

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Sounds like a seizure, but I would call your vet and make an appointment for blood work and make sure everything is okay.

    Always time something like this and write it down on your calendar so you know when it happened and how long it lasted in case at some point he needs medication.

    [Reply]

  58. kristen says:

    I’m sorry about ur dog but I have one question….We are watching my aunts dog and he has an anxiety disorder well he was in the cage and he started like freaking out and it woke me up.Well I saw him in the cage opened it up and pulled him out.He started like drooling massivly and peeing.I called my mom and she didn’t know what to do and she said just let him be.After he was scared of everybody of course only my sister and I are home so yeah.Well we went to go wipe his face and he backed up.He was fine for 1 and 30 minutes or so and then he did it again but on an open floor.Was that a seizure or something else???

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Sounds more like a seizure to me, but call and ask your vet!

    [Reply]

  59. kristen says:

    He has had three so far today and I ddon’t know what to do I have timed them and all of them are under 1 minute and I stayed calm the last two times but the first one I kinda freaked out because I didn’t know what was happening and so will he be ok??

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    call your vet

    [Reply]

  60. Krista says:

    Not sure if this is seizure related or not. We met with the vet today as well. This morning my dog vomited before my husband went to work, just a kind of mucousy/foamy and it has happened in the morning in the past and I know when it is going to happen because her face/lips look like she is smiling/evil grin but her skin is taut all around her lips. I always thought this was just like a gag type thing. Back to today about an hour later I was getting ready to leave the house for a dentist appt when she whimpered and then jumped off the couch and just kind of layed on the floor for 30 seconds or so and her back legs looked to be shaking and she was laying in a awkward position I have never seen her in before, I didn’t notice her to be unresponsive and she was conscious this is the first time this has ever happened after the facial tightness/vomiting, although after she vomits she does seem scared or something for a few mins after but the first time for this sequence. I called my husband and he works close by and when he came home she vomited again and then seemed to shake for a while after and seemed scared and just “off” by the time we could get in to the vet an hr later she was a lot better. I didn’t tell the vet about the face tightening up thing because I didn’t think anything of it til I did some research about partial seizures in dogs. She thought it was just some type of gastritis because she did whimper when the vet pressed on a part of her stomach area and said to keep an eye and feed bland diet. Dog info 2.5 years old, mutt but has jack russell and beagle in her. Just wondering if I should call the vet and tell her about the facial thing to see if anything should be done to check for epilepsy. She had said if it happens again within the next 6 weeks with her laying with what i called tremors to call her and than they would do more tests. I am just not sure if maybe she has been having them all along or if it’s just normal for a dog’s face to look like that before they vomit.

    [Reply]

  61. Jasmine says:

    My Pomeranian had seizures daily. He never had just 1 a day, he had them multiple times a day. I witnessed one and it broke my heart. It was so sad to see him look at me and whine and not be able to move and me knowing I couldn’t do anything about it. We had to put him outside because there was poop and pee all over the walls and his cage and it got hard having to clean that up multiple times a day. And he always had stuff all over him so I got scared to even touch him. One time during his seizure he had blood come out of his mouth after the foam. It was so scary and so upsetting. Then one day I went out and he wasn’t anywhere to be found.. I don’t know what happened.

    [Reply]

  62. bob says:

    My dog hurt his back this weekend and the vet gave him a sedative and then put him on buprenorphine and methocarbamol for four days. He was in a coma like state. His joints and legs began swelling and then the vet said it was time to unwind the drugs and get him moving. He woke him up on the 5th day to find a happy dog. When he stood him up he went into a massive seizure and passed. I spoke with his primary vet, who is in another state, who said he must have town a blood clot to the brain. this vet said he must have had a brain mass. My primary vet said he would have never let him lay down at 13 years old for 5 days. He would have administer fentanol and made up get up daily. I feel bad and I am rally confused about what really happened. Does anyone have any knoweled of this ?
    Thanks,
    Bob

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    All vets react differently. Your primary care doctor in another state has all of the information that the vet who provided the care did not. It is much easier to know what to do after the fact.

    If you want to investigate further you need the body of your dog and a necropsy done by a 3rd part vet.

    [Reply]

  63. jan says:

    My 4 yr old staf, has been sufferjn from fits since last aug, he has been put on the highest meds a dog an have amd succesfully from the 27 nov 2014 he has not had a fit, which was fab news, badly sadly today he has nad 8 fits from 2am the morning till just 20mins ago he had his last fit, he has not slept since 2am and every time he does he has another fit. It seems now wen he wants to sleep the fits start. His brain had been damage from toxins in his body from he was posioned last aug.surely a dog is allowed some sleep with out triggering another fit. I feel tonight is going to be a long night. As he wont settle at all, he just constantly pacing the house. My pood baby. So sad amd so tiring, but we nere for him no matter what.

    [Reply]

  64. jeanne hynson says:

    my 4 yr old Yorkie had his first cluster seizure’s 6 mo ago he was doing fine on phenol B he had a grand mall lasted several hours they upped his meds and a week later having small ones foaming at the mouth for the last 2 mo I cant hardly pet him or pick him up he screams in pain this is the 2nd vet they aid its normal um screaming is pain has anyone heard of this he seems to be very tender at the slightest touch could he have a brain tumor?
    please help as long as he is stiil he wont scream but if I lift him a certain way he yells even when I clean his face and the corner of his eues he screams its like his pin tollerence is real tender

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Dogs scream for all kinds of reasons. One only has to own a Husky to realize screaming and vocalizations can mean anything.

    I once had a dog who was to receive surgery the next day. We put him on a Fentanyl patch that night and he screamed and cried all night… he wasn’t in pain… he was high. Different things cause different reactions.

    However I have never heard of a seizure lasting that long, find a veterinary neurologist and get a second opinion if you wish.

    [Reply]

  65. Sharron says:

    On January the 21st 2015 my Sweet companion, Piper, a Boston Terrier had surgery to remove a t
    mammary tumor the was in a sack. Surgery went well, she healed, was happy. Two weeks later February 9th at 2:30 in the morning she started whimpering. I thought maybe she had some pain from the surgery so I checked her and she had a rash all over her belly no temp. so I gave her some benadyrl 1/4 tsp. she went back to sleep. At 4:30 she woke me up she was throwing up and had her first seizure of 6. my daughter came downstairs and Piper started screaming everytime she had a seizure they were small at first and were about 2 minutes long. She continued having them until 7 o’clock
    I thought they had ended and was getting ready to take her to the vets office when she had a bad one she threw up lost her bowels it was a bloody stool. She went stiff and screamed her breathing was shallow. When we got to the vets office they took her from me and put her on oxygen. She came around but was in a stupor then she started screaming again. I later was called by the vets office and was told to transfer her to a hospital. she was sedated but woke up half way there. The vet hospital kept her that night she was sedated and diagnosis with Inflammatory Gastroenteritis. She still was screaming alnight. I came to take her back to the vets office and they told me she had been sedated with a drug that would keep her quite for the ride it didnt and again she was screaming. She had no eye movement or dialation in her eyes..Piper was my co pilot in life. Her screams tore my heart up. I waited a few minutes for the vet as Piper was screaming and decided to put her down. I felt guilty that I was keeping her alive for my own selfishness. It was the hardess thing I have ever done and is haunting me. What happened to my sweet babies why was she screaming? My questions is was she brain dead when I first took her too the vet? Was She in pain? The vets say it was the best thing to do. an you give me any answers as to why she had these seizures? Was it the cancer surgery? ~ miss her so much

    [Reply]

  66. Donna says:

    My 18 month old Yorkie Harper fell down the stairs and landed on her head, she had a seizure right there, but never had one since, it’s been 3 months and she’s still wobbly on her feet and looks dazed and confused all the time, she’s still on meds, but the last 3 weeks she’s stopped chewing, drinking water and barking, I have no idea what to do anymore, I give her water with a syringe every hour, but what if I’m not around, the vet doesn’t know what’s going on, I’m totally lost.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    It’s time to get her an MRI she may have brain or neurological damage that only an MRI can diagnose.

    Having gotten an MRI for my dog, I know it is expensive and sometimes a drive but it is worth it. It saved my dog’s life.

    [Reply]

  67. Allison says:

    My 11 year old Lhasa Apso had her first seizure tonight. It was terrifying. She also lost control of her bladder during. My husband rushed her to an emergency vet to which they took vital signs and a blood sugar test and told us that it was normal. They advised that we watch her overnight and take her to our regular vet in the morning for blood work. Now that she is home, she seems to be breathing weird. It sounds like her nose is stuffed and makes a gurgling noise. She sometimes shivers when she breathes in and has also hacked/gagged a few times. I’m so worried that she’s going to die overnight but the emergency vet sent her home. Has anyone else experienced strange sounds or weird breathing from the dog after a seizure?

    [Reply]

  68. Sahir says:

    My Lhasa is a terrier mix and is about 12 yrs and 6 months. She has been diagnosed with Jaundice some or some liver ailment ( her haemoglobin was 20.4, PCV .54 was RBC is 57.6) just 2 days ago. The Vet gave her an injection that was some liver extract hormone, i feed her plain chicken stock with some chicken or some pedigree. Now, she hasn’t been eating all that well but ate well today. At midnight she had her first “fit” ever. Its been 20 min now and her vision seems to be coming back. She, however is howling and walking around restlessly, she even lost bowel control and peed during her 2 min “fit”. Now she is eating and wouldn’t sleep. How worried should i be? Am i doing the right thing? Is my Vet doing the right thing?
    Would really appreciate some insights on this.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Find a veterinary specialist. No one but a vet can give you good information, but getting a second opinion is always valid when you have concerns.

    [Reply]

  69. Cherie says:

    Hello everyone. I have a pomapoo who started having seizures at three months. I found a website with lifesaving information called nzymes.com. I have had my dog on these nzymes and never looked back. This is nothing short of a miracle because she has not had a seizure since. I wish you and your pets all the best..

    [Reply]

  70. Tracey says:

    Hi Suzanne- I realize this was posted several years ago but I wanted to see if you e we figured out if the hacking cough and potassium bromide were related? A little over 2 years ago my epileptic chihuahua developed a persistent hack that, after much online research of medical journals, I discovered was caused by an overdose of potassium bromide. I decreased the dosage slightly with approval of my vet and problem was solved…until yesterday, when the hacking started again. I’m convinced it’s once again related to too much KBr. Did you resolve your issue? Any insight is greatly appreciated.

    [Reply]

  71. Ang says:

    my beautiful golden retriever is 11 years old now yesterday she was giving her dose of advantage Multi within 2 hours of receiving that dose my perfectly healthy dog had 7 Grand Mall seizures 7. Now her veterinarian has put her on pretty heavy drugs one for her stomach acid and that drives with the ivermecton poisoning the reason why I know it is ever Mac 10 poisoning is because in Canada and more than likely all of North American they have been doing studies on this drug since 2009 because of all the adverse side effects that have happened things like cats losing fur or getting burns where the medication was applied. as for dogs there are no warnings on this package to not give two elderly dogs there are no warnings about it being a neurotoxin and this medicine that I gave to help my dog just may have killed her I am angry I am disgusted I am planning on phoning every single licensing I hope this available for me to call to let them know that the investigation that was started on May 5th 2009 on spot on free treatment products is taking a little bit too long dogs are dying animals are getting sick all with the medicine that is supposed to help them. I have a very tainted view of Big Pharma as well as several other people I know I do believe that all the money that they lose trying to kill off humans they are more than willing to use index but its to try to kill off our pets. Big Pharma has no scruples they will continue to give chemo and radiation to cancer even though they know it doesn’t work they will continue to tell you that your cholesterol is your problem even though they know that that’s not true they know it is caused by inflammation inflammation probably caused by your diet so why do I seem surprised that they may have actually done the right thing with our pets well I am surprised I am surprised that we continue to put faith into drug companies and all they want to do is kill us with their drugs they will give us one drug that will affect your liver and then when they need to give you a drug for your liver it will affect your heart and then when you’re your heart drug house to be administered your veins are going to go in their own your bloods going to stop flowing won the blood stops flowing your dad but Big Pharma has our money and that’s all than any politician in this country or any other North American country cares about I hope everyone read this and realizes how upset I am about the drugs that have been given to my dog kick your problem that was caused by drugs made by Bayer

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    The truth is that we need the big pharmaceutical companies. The good that they do out weighs the bad, unfortunately.

    The hard part is that not every individual reacts the same so there are bad side effects that sometimes risk our, or our dog’s health.

    I am sorry for your trauma

    [Reply]

  72. Wendy says:

    Trying to find out what other people’s experiences have been like. Our 11.5 year old dog had her first seizure in February. She experienced labored breathing afterwards for quite some time. At the emergency bet, they gave her oxygen, even though her blood was well oxygenated.
    She just had another seizure this morning, and 4.5 hours later, is still experiencing labored breathing. She’s settled now and has calmed down a bit.
    So yes, I have seen labored breathing after a seizure. It’s scary.

    [Reply]

  73. Christine says:

    My 11 year old shorkies has begun to have seizures. He has 1 every 3 months. He tilts his head, walks in circles then holds up legs. Stiffens and trembles. They las 2 -3 minutes. After he is docile and goes off by himself to sleep.
    The vet has done blood work and his work comes back good.
    It is terrible to see him and hold him when this happens, it breaks my heart.
    Does anyone else have this happen?

    [Reply]

  74. Alok Thapa says:

    That sounds like my 9 year old dog 🙁
    She was sleeping when newspaper guy came (his whistle irritates my dog) and while jumping off the couch she landed on her neck. She had cluster seizures that lasted hours. It’s been 5 days without seizures but she’s not able to stand and can’t use her hind-legs. She’s active though, eats, tries to jump whenever I visit her at the hospital.

    I’m thinking of getting MRI for her. Any suggestion??

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Listen to your vet, only they know your dog, history, and situation

    [Reply]

  75. gina martinez says:

    I own a 9 year old bull mastiff. about 6 months ago he started having seizures regularly. They have started getting worse as he has now started having more than one in a day. the vet can only send him to a specialist wich will cost 1000’s of dollars i dont have. I am wondering if its because of his age. (his life expectancy is bettween 8 and 10 years) and his life is simply winding down??? its traumatic….I dont know what to do

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    sometimes the vet visit will help you have more time. I spent $3,000 for a MRI after this article and had several more months with my dog. Money well spent for me.

    [Reply]

  76. Victoria says:

    My eight year old cocker mix beanie just had his first seizure opened his mouth like he was gagging earlier some drooling. Then rolled off the sofa stuff legged lay on his side turned when I touched him perhaps to bite? Over quickly two min lasted then he walked outside past his brother not seeing him though I will take him to vet in am I have noticed labored breathing lately. Loss of appetite It breaks my heart he is my favorite and my angel always watches my face. !!

    [Reply]

  77. Teresa says:

    I have a 18 yr old Border Collie “China”. She just had her 3rd seizure this evening this one has been the worse. We took her to vet on first one they said to watch her it was several days then she had another we did blood work her creatinine levels were too high. She was in kidney failure. We put her on mild seizure meds antibiotics and she is already on thyroid and a special diet of low protein and fiber. Try to find that in the pet stores
    You can get it from the vet’s office. All these dog food manufacturer want to promote high protein no grain but no one tells you when pup gets older she can’t process all that protein. So I was killing her thinking I was giving her the best food around. She is settled down now for the night we now have emergency seizure diazepam and God’s will to enjoy whatever time we have left with her. Dog food manufacturer s should promote all of the special food not just the big money makers.

    [Reply]

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *