How to Create an Aggressive Dog

Thanks to Lances Curve for the photo

Okay, so that was a little tongue in cheek… most people don’t want to create an aggressive dog, protective maybe, but that is a whole different article for more on creating a dog that intimidates people click here!

But sometimes we silly humans do things to our dogs that they don’t understand; or for them so clearly breeds aggression because although we expect our dogs to understand us and learn our language; we so rarely learn theirs!

I have gotten quite a few comments lately about dogs being left on a tie out, or tie down, or tether or *gasp a chain (I hate, hate, hate chains that denotes a permanent tie out to me, but however you want to put it) and becoming overly aggressive; “For no apparent reason”.

So Let’s Break This Down

What The Human Thinks

Chaining can also create sad dogs.

Chaining can also create sad dogs.

  • I want to put/leave my dog outside but I am having trouble containing him.
  • I don’t want to leave my dog inside while I am gone.
  • My dog chews on things so I must leave him outside (then this, sadly, becomes permanent).
  • My dog needs to be outside.
  • Crates are inhumane; I would rather leave my dog outside where he can get some exercise.

What the Dog Thinks

  • At first: Wooo Whoooo I’m outside!!!
  • Why am I tied up?
  • Why can’t I get away?
  • What did I do wrong?
  • I’m bored… maybe I will bark to entertain myself
  • This is MY territory!!!
  • … What was that noise?
  • …. Who is that?
  • …. GRRRRR  BARK Get away from me person I don’t know…!!!!
  • I’m so scared, why am I alone and tied up??
  • Why doesn’t anyone come and visit me anymore?  Where are my people?
  • Look my barking scares people away!  This is a fun game!
Aggression comes naturally to a chained or restricted dog

Aggression comes naturally to a chained or restricted dog

Tie downs often create aggression in even a normally social dog.

I could take a normal, very social dog and tie him up to a tree or a post for several days and you could watch his behaviors and sociability deteriorate at a very rapid rate.  Some dogs, in high traffic areas, can get very aggressive very quickly.

It is frustrating, confusing and sometimes very scary to be tied up and feel like you can’t get away!

So at first when he sees a person, he might be simply frustrated that he can’t get to the person and be petted.

Then, he is confused.  Why can’t he get to that person?  Why doesn’t the person stop and talk to him and pet him?  Why does everyone just keep walking past?  What is wrong with people?

Confusion leads to agitation and irritation as he continues to ask himself these questions.

Now, let us all admit that some people, especially children like to tease a dog on a tie down.

This teasing leads to more frustration and agitation which quickly leads to aggression.

Pretty soon it doesn’t take anything other than seeing someone walk by for the dog to get defensive and irritated.

And remember, that was a normally social dog.

Now imagine a nervous or fearful dog, or an already aggressive dog… and you have a faster recipe for disaster.

What People Don’t Realize

A Secure Fenced Yard is the Only Place to Safely Leave Your Dog Unattended!

A Secure Fenced Yard is the Only Place to Safely Leave Your Dog Unattended!

Dogs are easily visually stimulated (by almost everything… squirrels, kids, people, bags floating past) and when they realize they are stuck in one place they become easily frustrated.

Frustration leads to barking and that often leads to more barking and pretty soon some aggression.

Boredom leads to more noticing of everything else that is going on; so in other words he might not have seen that squirrel 3 houses away, except he is bored so he begins noticing everything going on around him.

The dog feels like he has nowhere to go, no way to get away and most dogs are territorial (this is why they bark ferociously when someone comes to the door) so putting him on a tie out multiplies these feelings by 1000 or more!

Dogs don’t want, nor do they need to be constantly overstimulated like this!  This type of constant overstimulation leads to a dog with serious aggression and over excitement issues.  It is like a person with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder PTSD the dog ends up living in an almost constant state of panic and over stimulation because he feels bombarded and under attack almost continually.

Even a dog left outside in a chain linked fenced area can develop some of these problems; but at least they feel like they can better protect themselves because they are not tied up!

A Dog can Be Very Happy and Feel Secure in His Crate!

A Dog can Be Very Happy and Feel Secure in His Crate!

What a Dog Really Needs?

I, personally, don’t believe in leaving dogs outside while you are gone; too many bad things can happen.  And, as a professional dog trainer I have learned that dogs left outside often bark and barking dogs very often get poisoned (you would not believe how many!!).

I like leaving my dogs at home, either loose in the house if they will not get into trouble (but with the blinds closed so they don’t over stimulate themselves).

Or, in a crate where they can feel safe and they are not over stimulated.

A crate is a place to chill and sleep and maybe chew a bone until your family returns.  Being left in a crate keeps you from worrying who is coming up the drive or what is going on around you.

I Use Tie Downs

I Use Tethers Even in My Home, but NEVER Leave My Dog Alone on One!

I Use Tethers Even in My Home, but NEVER Leave My Dog Alone on One!

They are not totally evil!!

Tie downs are perfectly acceptable means of restraining your dog IF YOU ARE THERE with them!!

I won’t even get into how often dogs break off these, or strangle themselves to death with them or how leaving them permanently to live on one is cruel and abusive!

Tie downs and tie outs are meant for restriction while you are with your dog but are not for leaving your dog on for any significant period of time.

I use my tie outs for training purposes (to frustrate them into barking for that article click here).

And, I also use them when I go to the park with family and friends to keep my dog contained in one specific area if I need to or can’t trust my dog off leash.

I even use tie downs in my house to contain crazy dogs so they don’t chase cats or get into fights.

But, I NEVER leave them alone or unattended on a tie out.  It is just not worth it to me!

I don’t want an aggressive… or a dead dog!

Want To Learn How To Eradicate Nearly ALL Your Dog’s Aggressive Behaviors?

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Comments

  1. Laura says:

    Thanks for addressing this. Many people don’t realize how dangerous tying dogs out can be…especially to unsuspecting children.

    [Reply]

  2. THANK YOU for the GREAT INFORMATION and INSTRUCTION. GOOD, NO GREAT JOB !!!!!!!

    Neil

    [Reply]

  3. I run a dog kennel in SC and like to stay apprised of what people are saying about dog training and whatnot. This is great information for me to pass along to my clients. Thanks for the post. I agree with you totally about not keeping your dog tied up outside!

    [Reply]

  4. Koby says:

    Thank you for all the great articles, and advise!!!
    I am so blessed, I must have the most social, and obedient dog I know
    especially when I read some of the articles. I drive a hatch back, and
    my dog Lucy, which incidentally I adopted from the SPCA. has her “car”
    bed in the back space, where she travels when in the car, and she loves
    that!!! I can go shopping and open the hatch, I tell her to stay and guard the car, and she does not move, she lies down and is totally relaxed when I return. On hot days I leave my garage door a quarter lifted
    so air can flow thru the house, and because it is the coolest place, Lucy
    will lie there and watch people pass by, even when her “playmates” walk
    past with their people she does not go out to meet with them. All this
    happened with very little/no definite training!!! Would you say then she
    is a happy/content dog? And maybe we understand each other very well, and
    she feels secure!!! Just thought I would like to share with you, how great
    and intelligent Dogs really are!!!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Dogs are the BEST!!! She sure sounds happy.

    And, you are very lucky!! Even I have a couple of naughty dogs lol!

    [Reply]

  5. Syl says:

    Great article! Lots of information. Good instruction. Great job I agree! Enjoyed reading it. Closing the blinds is a good suggestion. Our babies go ballistic barking at things out the front windows. Why have a dog at all if you’re gonna keep it tied out all the time???? Cruelty I call it!

    [Reply]

  6. Heather says:

    I live in France and the number of dogs that live their whole life on a chain out here is staggering. I wish I could get the owners to read this article and understand what they are doing to their dogs. Unfortunately most would just give a shrug say it’s a guard dog and do nothing!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Guard dogs are no good at all if they are tied up. I have 3 protection trained/police dogs.

    But if they can’t get to the bad guy, they do me and my family no good 😉

    [Reply]

  7. Sandy o says:

    Before we had a fence, we had a golden retriever. We used a runner that was attached to a tree and the other end to the house right by the back porch. He could get up the porch when he wanted to come in. Though this was not the best situation, he did not have trouble with this set up, he stayed a mild dog and hardly ever barked a people going by. We did, however, fence in the yard as soon as we had the money.

    Now we have 3 dogs, 2 chihuahua’s and a dauschaund. They do like to bark at people going by, especially the 2 males, but we don’t leave them out long. In the cold NE winters, they are out for maybe 3-5 minutes. In the summer, they like to go out until they get warm, come in to cool off, back ot to warm up…on and on, lol

    Would the males be considered agressive since they do bark at passing people and dogs?

    Thanks, sandy o

    [Reply]

  8. Judy Jones says:

    Very interesting. I have used a tie out only for potting purposes because I didn’t have a fenced yard. Today with my new dog I use a crate for only when I’m gone. I hate to see dogs chained up and left alone all the time. Thanks again, Judy

    [Reply]

  9. Andrea says:

    I hate to see dogs tied. I know of some who seem to be tied to their dog house for their entire life. I don’t know about the rest of the country but where I live the law is you can only leave a dog chained for one hour a day. I recently called the SPCA and reported a neighbor who left their dog chained to its dog house with a 2 ft tether where it could not move. It could not even get into its dog house and it was sleeting outside!! I am well aware of the huge problem this is.

    [Reply]

  10. Carrie says:

    Thank you for the insight. It makes sense that we feel like we are doing something nice for our dog & he is getting over stimulated. I don’t allow my children to be over stimulated by their environment. Now I learned – not to allow it with our dog either.

    [Reply]

  11. Betty Bakken says:

    It,s to bad the tables cannot be reversed. Put the pet owner in a 6×10 run and come out of the house in the evening and bring food and water and maybe in the morning, too and see how it is for the owner to wait all day and watch the house door for food and water to appear. No one to interact with or show any reason for you to be alive but to feed and water you. Perhaps these pets would be more appreciated.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Exactly!

    [Reply]

  12. Bree says:

    Hi. I have a few problems with my dog.

    1. My dog nips when he is bored or he does not want to do something. When he was a little pup I thought it was cute. Now he bites hard. Why is he doing this? How can I stop him from doing this?

    2. My dog hates his crate! It takes like 10 minutes to get him in his crate. Pushing him is not working (he nips at me) and treats work only half the time. How can I get him to like his crate?

    3. He also jumps on people.

    [Reply]

    Carol Reply:

    We have a little dog that bites people..not us. and Barks aggressively. We have tried Barkbusters and our trainer did a good job so our problems are much better. About 75%.

    We are gaining ground using her techniques but there is the point of ?why do we have dogs? We like them on our laps(beside us mostly). We love them and want to encourage the return of same.
    I’m sure we lost her interest when we said that one dog still rolls up in his blanket at the end of the bed at night…the other stays most of the night in his crate then in the morning is allowed up on the bed for about an hour.

    This cant be the only reasons he still acts out around people and bites(nips) strangers.

    All help is welcome. Thank you.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Not all dogs are social.

    One of mine barely tolerates me, and he’d love to get a piece of someone.

    So it is my goal to make sure that never happens. So I keep him on a leash always (even when people are over) or I put him in his crate.

    And sometimes I use a basket muzzle so an accident never happens.

    As aloof as he is, even with me, I would be devastated to have to euthanize him for biting.

    [Reply]

    Lindsey Reply:

    Treat the dog only when he is IN the crate. Leave the crate open and make it a safe place. If you treat him once he goes in he will want to go in. Feed him in there. Check the website for crate games. It takes time but is well worth it as eventually you will find your dog will go there as a safe place. Use a clicker to train him/her

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    He nips because at one time you thought it was cute and it sounds like he has always been dominant/aggressive. I would keep him on a leash and exercise him A LOT!!!!

    I would also play crate games. Go back to the blog and search crate for more articles.

    And, a leash can help you keep him off of people!

    [Reply]

    Gerry Reply:

    I had an agressive wire haired fox terrier that hated crating. First, I cured her of some of her aggressiveness. Keeping her out of the her crate helped a lot with that. In time, she learned that agressiveness meant crating.

    An alternative to crating that I used was a fixed lead in the house. I hooked the end of a chain lead under a counter where it could not be seen yet easily removed. This was by a doorwall where she could still see outside. I placed her bed in this area and she loved it. She had about a five foot radius to roam and did not feel “locked up.” She came when called and went right to the area happily. She slept here on the lead at night, keeping a watch for anything outside and became a great watch dog. If I let her roam the house freely at night, she terrorized the cat and eventually ended up in my bed and that is NOT acceptable!

    She was never my favorite dog and I wasn’t her favorite either. My daughter and wife were very close to her. She passed about two years ago very suddenly. I now have a Wire Haired Dachsund that is without a doubt the smartest and best dog I’ve ever had, and I’ve had over 20 dogs. No crate or lead necessary. Close training has him developed superior manners in him yet he is a wonderful watch dog with the bark of a dog three times his size.

    The tie down in the house was the best thing I could have done for for my aggressive dog and was necessary for her health and safety.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I still don’t think it is safe to leave dogs on tie downs, it is risking their death by choking or getting tied up and injuring themselves.

    [Reply]

  13. Deborah says:

    There is a dog (German Shepherd male) in my neighborhood (3 houses away)that is left out at ALL hours of the day and night and at all temperatures also. It can be 2 degrees like the other night here in Illinois – (God knows what the “it feels like” temp is to this dog!) The dog barks CONSTANTLY. I don’t know how the people closer handle it but it is very disturbing to me personally and emotionally.

    Because of the yard’s position my back door is facing the side of their “short in height” chain link fence so that when I come out my yard (that is not fenced-he has a straight shot if he jumps the fence) he comes to the fence and precedes to heighten his bark at me, jumping with his paws on the top of the fence. I am the lady that has the good animal energy too! It is just a matter of time that this dog figures out that he can jump that fence and get me or something else. This is a frustrated dog.

    The question is: What do I do?

    If the owner is STUPID enough to leave their dog out, and let them bark constantly with no discipline then they will not be SMART enough if they are personally told about how annoying their dog is and what kind of danger they are putting their dog in.

    Note: I also have a “next door” neighbor that has two dogs that run the fence barking constantly all summer long. She thinks that it is “what dogs do.” People walk down other streets due to these two dogs. So as you can see I am worn out with out of control dogs! Help!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Utilize animal control and keep making complaints. Hopefully they will step in and the dog is not too far gone to be adopted by a normal family that would love him.

    [Reply]

    Sandy Reply:

    Many people do not know about the alternative of calling the purebred rescue – in this case G. Shepard. These are expert pet owners running non-profits that love that breed. They will help you hound the SPCA to do something. A watch dog on a chain is something to NOT ignore. It takes a village if the owners are being that negligent and abusive.

    [Reply]

    birgit Reply:

    I live in Irbed/Jordan. We have two german shepherd mix dogs ( male/neutered and female 9 months old ), both under training and doing very well.In our neighbourhood it became a fashion to get big dogs but alas without any sort of training. So you can imagine the nights we are having because everyone keeps his dog tied down in the yard and they do nothing but “communicating” the whole night through to kill the boredom. For me, coming from Austria where we are used to having dogs who are trained and taken care of (in general), it is sometimes hard to see what is going on here, but what can you do? There are no authorities to contact, and if somebody complaints, the whole dog-owner-community in the area is affected and the municipality will destroy everything on 4 legs. And to talk to the owners generally has similar results.

    [Reply]

  14. Ray says:

    I have a 15 lb. Boston Terrier and am not sure what size crate I should by for him? At the moment he is sleeping in his travel crate but I want to get him a regular crate so I can crate him while I am at work! Can you please give me your recommendations? Thanks very much!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    It needs to be big enough for him to stand up and turn around, and lay comfortably; but it doesn’t need to be huge 🙂

    [Reply]

  15. Valerie says:

    Thank you so much for making sure you talk about the POSITIVE POINTS of using a tiedown.

    I have raised 18 Guide Dogs for the Blind puppies and the tiedown is a fantastic tool to use in potty training. I am a private trainer also and very strongly instruct my clients on how to and HOW NOT TO use the tiedown.

    Hopefully everyone is reading the “whole post” and get down to the “positive” portion of using a tiedown!!!

    Thanks s much for all the information you share!!!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    My youngest is still on a tie down lol. He is a monster so a tie down keeps my other dogs from wanting to kill him 😉

    I love tie downs, I just would never leave a dog on one!

    [Reply]

  16. Donna Kerr says:

    I raised Shih-Tsu’s for 22 years! My dogs were always in the house with me because I loved all of them! My last 2 Shih-Tsu’s die of old age 3 years ago! I was devastated when they died! I am living on SSI and have been looking for another Shih-Tsu but have not had any luck yet because I can’t afford to pay $200 to $400 for one! I made sure my dogs never got fleas or ticks by giving them a Comfortis pill every month!

    [Reply]

  17. Don Robinson says:

    What breed of dog is the brown one pictured next to “tie downs?” I have a dog just like this. I was told once what it was but I forgot and haven’t been able to find it on the net. Thanks, Don

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Honestly I think that is a little mix 🙂

    [Reply]

  18. Daryl Demmer says:

    Hi

    I don’t want to but my dog is the ultimate escape artist as I have raised the wall in the one section of my property to just over 2meters and one she jumps this she gets over the other walls which are over 1.5meters high, what else can i do?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Invest in a taller fence, or utilize invisible fence.

    But when you are gone make sure she is left inside in a crate if you need to.

    [Reply]

    Ethel Reply:

    My lab,chow mix ,Sister, gets tied down once or twice a month when I go grocery shopping. I have to do this to keep her from digging under the fence and getting out into the alley.I live in a little house off the alley. She has dug out twice and came with in a hairs breath of getting hit. The cars and trucks that use the alley seem to think it is a freeway. She is never on the chain more than two to two and a half hours.

    [Reply]

  19. Judy says:

    We adopted our dog, Cooper, from the local Animal Shelter. He was listed as a “Shepherd mix” but we think he is part Irish Setter/German Shepherd. We were told he was kept tied in the yard during the day. At almost 3 years old he is very aggressive on leash and seems to be frightened by squirrels, chipmunks, other dogs. He is gradually becoming more trusting and less aggressive, but it is a long process. Do you have suggestions for socializing him with other dogs and humans without endangering them?
    Thank you–

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    There is no shame in getting him use to a basket muzzle and then having him happily wear it. It takes a while to get use to, but it keeps everyone safe until he can be comfortable.

    [Reply]

  20. Irene H. says:

    Oh my goodness, I think our rescue dog is a product of this type of abuse, he exhibits the overstimulation and over-easy barking at every little thing even though he has been with us since September 2012. Can anybody tell me how to start to un-ravel the damage that’s been done?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I would work on eye contact and focus behavior so when he gets over stimulated you can have him look at you!

    [Reply]

    Irene H. Reply:

    Our rescue is 6 yrs old. We were told he had been left out in the back yard his entire life, so it seems perfectly possible he was tied up as well. He’s not terribly big, 40 pounds with a Corgi lower body, but the growl of a lion and everything sets him off, from an animal sound on TV to our teen children coming thru the door. On the positive side, I have been able to reduce barking Significantly with sirens with heavy use of treats. Is this the kind of focus you are suggesting? I could apply this to other areas? We truly hope he’s not “ruined”.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/eye-contact-focus-behavior-broken/

  21. May Doyle says:

    Hi Chet, My two terriers are very well behaved in every way EXCEPT when they see me putting on my coat to take them for a walk. One of them goes hysterical barking. I have claimed the doorway and this works until I step outside and tell them to come out. I paid for your book last year but it never arrived (or it could have been the year before) I enjoy my dogs but I would be grateful for any tips on how to stop their excitement barking when we are preparing for a walk. I also have a 2 year old Golden Retriever whose manners are impeccable.
    Many thanks,
    May Doyle
    Wexford
    Ireland

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Put that coat on and do the same things you would do before you go on a walk, then don’t go.

    Do this often!!

    Eventually the trigger (you putting on your coat) will mean nothing and they won’t know when you plan a walk and when you are just running through the motions.

    [Reply]

  22. I hated the thought of crating a dog til I got my shiba inu he puts himself in the kennel and barks for us to give him a toy and close the door AND cover it. I am amazed. I don’t tie my dog anywhere I have always been worried they would strangle themselves or tip water over and have nothing to drink. This is my first purebred. I am retired but in my life I have had many dogs and never tied them. If I were to take them to a park I would use a leash (which is required even to walk a dog) I liked reading the article. thank for e-mailing me.

    [Reply]

  23. els says:

    The best thing we ever did was spend $3000 on a fence. Now the dogs can be outside when we are home and they love it! When we are gone, they come inside, the two big dogs (a yellow lab and a pittbul/lab mix) hang out on their couches and the little one (an American Eskimo puppy) stays in her crate since she is still chewing. The kitchen/family room is our “dog room”, the rest of the house is off limits, 3’gates block the doors out of there. Even though all three dogs could easily jump the gates, they don’t. They are happy with their space and the rest of our house stays cleaner. It’s a win-win situation, especially if we get guests that are not into/or allergic to dogs.

    [Reply]

  24. lostalien says:

    if you can’t take care of an animal without putting them on a chain then you don’t deserve one!!

    [Reply]

  25. Meisam Dost says:

    Hi, i have a dog, he is one and half years old and i am his third owner. he is very clever and lovely but i have a very big problem.. he is so aggressive on people , even those he knows.. he keeps barking when he sees my friends and family for like 2 min and then he calms down.. even when he meets someone who’s just gone and back in less than 30 mins.any way,, he is also so sensitive on my neighbors .. i am living in an apartement which has 8 unit in a floor.. so when some one come in the corridor or open or close the door of their flat.. he starts barking again and again.. i really have to idea how can i deal with this .. and was wondering to find out a solution in this regard here..
    his last owner handed him to me it s about 2 months.. he is so nice and great and calm to me and i can feel he loves me SOOOO much..
    plz let me know what am gonna do to deal with his nervous barking on people and neighbors.
    thank
    meisam_md@yahoo.com

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Teach him to be quiet on command.

    Watch how easily I command my dog’s mouth http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/top-5-reasons-dog-quiet/

    [Reply]

  26. lostalien says:

    I can’t imagine a person that thinks they love their dog but chains their best friend up. They don’t deserve a dog. It needs to illegal. Every state,city,county should have a license fee of 25-100 pr animal so we can take care of all the abused animals. If you can’t afford the vet bills and flea medicine and all the other cost then you don’t deserve to have a animal they depend on you just like a child to take care of them. I grew up with working cattle dogs and they were care for like family because they were family and they took care of us. I’m done speaking out but I’m just really PISSED OFF SEEING THESE PICTURES. I have a neighbor that say’s he is a dog lover but he chains his dog! Yeah a real dog lover!

    [Reply]

  27. Julie Roberts says:

    I grew up in the 1950s and 60s. We always tied our dogs when we let them outside. As did everyone else back then. Not one of our dogs ever turned mean. “just sayin”. I think it has MORE to do with where they are, and as they say, whether people have access to tease them, or whatever.

    I have also had dogs in a 6 foot high fenced back yard, and others in wire fences, and others on runs. but, part of that time, we lived out in the country, so there were no passers by, that came close. I think a dog would purely die of boredom if left in a crate more than a few hours. My dog heads for his crate at bed time when he’s tired, but, he is none too happy about being put in there in the day time, when I go to the grocery store.

    I would not ever give a dog to someone who was going to leave it tied out. Nor would I give a dog to someone who was going to leave it in a crate for more than a few hours a day.

    [Reply]

    Don T Reply:

    I was born in 1945 – so the 50s and 60s – 35ks east of Melbourne Australia, seen a majority of dogs on varied lengths of chain – tied out. Chained up – I recall, was the common term.
    So frustration and aggression was rife. Can’t recall all that many that had even a modicum of training – so any aquired no no’s like; terrorizing or attacking livestock, poultry or passers -by, was addressed with chain it up – as was the dangerous traits; chasing cars, motorcycles or bicycles.
    Witnessed and knew of many that were killed instantly, or died later of internal injuries – being left to wander around the countryside – and coming to grief after being hit or run over beneath the wheels of; cars, trucks and farm machinery
    It’s sad that old habits die hard – but the information that’s at our fingertips – thanks to Minette and other experts – will hopefully be accessed and utilized
    Regards Don Thompson

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I’d rather see a crated dog than a dead or aggressive dog.

    Yes, in the 50’s there was more space and less common dog torment. But it would have happened if the dogs was in a city setting.

    There is no problem crating dogs if they are given training and exercise prior to crating.

    Lots of dogs that are left outside that bark are poisoned. I prefer a crated, happy, live dog 🙂

    [Reply]

    Jeri E Reply:

    We have a 4yo lab. He loves being outside in the fenced yard. When he is in the house, his crate is always open. We often find him sleeping in his crate during the day. When we leave him home he goes to his crate and stays there without the door being shut.
    When we are camping, we use a tie-out attached to our trailer to keep him safe. He is not left on the tie out if we are away from camp. He either goes with us or stays in the trailer on his bed. Outside, his crate is available to him at all times.
    We also have a year old Shih Tzu, He goes most everywhere with us, but when left at home, he resided in a childs Pack/Play pen. Has lot of of room to move around and his food/water available.

    [Reply]

  28. Patrica Mena says:

    I have a Lab mix..he is one year old…he has a few of the traits that you mentioned…We have a completely fenced in yard…I have a problem, he likes to chase my chickens..he hasn’t killed any,but he has grabbed them in his mouth…so we tie him on a rope on our porch during the day when the chickens are out during the day then at night he runs free..He is close to us all the time and never neglected..
    He barks when he see someone come to the gate and also if the neighbors dog bark…and sometimes at least to us for no reason at all..he was never tied until we got the chickens…he does have a fear of people he doesn’t know especially men..he does try to nip at there feet, and of coarse it scares a person. He also like to jump on people and loves little kids a lot..
    He gets a long walk in the morning and the evening… I would like to let him run free, but haven’t figured out how to stop him from chasing the chickens. He listens when he feels like it.. He is very strong and full of vigor..

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Build a place for the chickens to be safe and then he won’t have to be tied.

    OR crate him in the house.

    AND, he probably needs to be taken out on a leash when the chickens are out and taught how to behave!! If you teach him control eventually he will learn how to behave around the chickens…. he is a bird dog after all 😉

    [Reply]

  29. Pat says:

    Why can’t/won’t the Humane Society/local branches do anything about this? As long as it has ‘shelter’ a barrel!! food/uck, water, often empty dirty, dumped, AND the animal lives in its own waste, and mud, grass long gone. I have reported many sad dogs in the tie down situation and they come out and say, the above, had shelter/tags/ food & water. I guess you can’t mandate a person to love their pet and be social w/it.
    I would rather see these animals taken and adopted, and some if not adopted are better of put down. I also hate shelters that tie does (the big ones) to a dog house outside, we have a shelter like that in SC, and the dogs dig under their houses and hide under there, who is going to adopt a dog that has developed traits you described above.
    So sad.

    [Reply]

  30. Albert Mangion says:

    I am totally against having dogs chained up. I happen to own a mixed breed male Huskey/Malamute (53kgs) who runs freely around the house and never gets ito trouble because strangely enough he is an extreemly calm dog. I have however a pure breed 1yr8month old male Samoyed who is in constant agitation, always looking for things to destroy. this of course happens when he is left alone ( with the other dog) at night time because i leave them both inside a big garage which of course forms part of the house. being big dogs its unhealthy leaving them inside at the house at night and its too cold to leave them outside in the garden. Any ideas how i could possibly go around this problem as it is getting very tedious.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Why is it unhealthy to leave them inside?

    I crate my dogs when I am gone if they can’t be trusted in the house alone.

    If you need to run him prior to leaving so he is exhausted when you leave.

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  31. Jeannie says:

    I have a one year old Maltipoo.When i go away,she sleeps the whole time I’m gone,even for hours.I can tell because not one thing is out of place,not even her toys.Maybe it’s because I leave the tv on and she doesn’t feel so all alone.Whatever is the reason,it works.

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  32. Julie Roberts says:

    I become very frustrated when people assume that, because you live in the country you can let your dog run loose. I see ads in the paper all the time for people who want to give their dog to a country home where it can run free.

    Country dogs can not run free, they are subject to a lot of dangers, such as porcupines, skunks, racoons, and we had a cougar on our property, not that it ever killed one of our dogs. But, a dog may wander over to the neighbor’s and kill their chickens, lambs, calves. And they form packs and run around killing things, and possibly getting poisoned or shot by an angry farmers.

    [Reply]

  33. Maryann Beatty says:

    What about dogs who are left in a kennel with an indoor and outdoor area? not tied but fenced.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I wooden fence or a fence that they can’t see out of is best.

    Even chain link or invisible fencing can create a reactive dog.

    [Reply]

  34. Marie says:

    I likke this info!

    [Reply]

  35. betty bakken says:

    When I see a dog tied out of in a small kennel by itself I wish I could have the dog and the owner change places. So the owner would set in the corner of the pen waiting for someone to come to him/her. It is so sad that these dogs are left alone all the time, when theit desire is to be with their owner.

    [Reply]

  36. Wendy says:

    I have a Border Collie, and a cat. The cat has been terrorising (ie killing) baby birds in the neighbourhood, so he is now an indoor cat. The problem is how to allow the dog both inside and outside while I’m at work. I have been unsuccessful in my search for a doggie door that only my dog can access, but not the cat. I know my dog is miserable being confined to the backyard, the garage and the laundry, when she really wants access to the lounge and the bedroom. When I used to leave the back door open, my dog would ALWAYS be asleep on my bed when I got home. Any ideas anyone?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Do a search on line, there are doggy doors that only open for whatever animal has the “secret collar” 😉 it is a collar that sends a signal to the door to open so your cat would literally have to be under the dog for him to get out too.

    [Reply]

    Wendy Reply:

    Yes I’ve looked into those. PetStock (our local huge pet supplies store) has also looked, and they can only get them cat-sized. ie to allow access to your own cat but not neighbourhood cats.

    [Reply]

  37. P.moller says:

    I hired a professional dog trainer for my boxer. He suggested that I crate the dog when I leavE the house, this way he wouldnt do any damage. He said he uses a crate on his on dog. What is the right thing to do?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    yes I crate 2 out of 3 of my dogs when i leave also. Only 1 can be trusted right now the other 2 are under 1 & 2 years old and still need to mature. I love crates!

    [Reply]

  38. Mircea says:

    THANK YOU for the GREAT INFORMATION and INSTRUCTION.

    Mircea

    [Reply]

  39. Dawn says:

    My first dog, a gorgeous red brindle border collie, could not be contained by a 6 foot fence. He’d fly right over the top, barely touching it. He’d do it whether we were there or not, in the house or in the yard with him (he was usually inside with us anyway). So we added a rope. He hit the end of the rope, snapped it, and was over the fence without missing a stride. So then we went to one of those ‘dog chains’ with the rubber coating. That seemed like it snapped easier than the rope! Once again, missed not a stride, flew over the fence to the joy and adventure beyond. We went through a few of those chains, not believing how easily he snapped them and how little he was phased by it. Eventually, it went to a tow chain, it was the only thing he couldn’t break and make over the fence with. We never left him out there for very long (he was a very smart and social dog, we did a lot of training and some shows), but if he thought he could make an escape, he was going to find a way to do it!

    He was great once outside of fences. Not just highly trained and trainable, but a dog who could actually understand what you would mean if you just pointed wildly at the subjects of the task and repeated the command enough times. Wildly intuitive. He always stuck around when we were out on the farm or doing work.

    Later, we could let him out of the house without a rope/chain/6 feet of fence and if we monitored him when he was going potty, then back inside, there would be no monkey business. If we weren’t careful though, he’d easily glide over our 4′ fence (different house, no more chain) to go play with the neighborhood dogs and roll in dead things by the river. Unfortunately he met his end when my step dad let him out one morning before work and didn’t stick around to bring him back in after he was done doing his business. Over the fence, to his dog friend, and then into the road where he died. 🙁

    [Reply]

  40. Teigan says:

    Hi this is a great article! I’ve been trying to convince my friends that tie-downs aren’t good, and I finally have something to show them to prove it! 😉
    Also, we recently adopted a puppy from our humane society. They told us that she is mostly German Shepherd, but that the rest is a mix of unknown dog breeds. We’re trying to figure out what the rest could be, and she looks exactly like the dog in the first picture! (Top of the article) The only difference is that she has white on the tips of her paws! Just wondering, what type of dog is that??? It would really help us out if we could know; thanks!

    [Reply]

  41. Phoenix says:

    While I agree with you, on principle, I have an issue with the neighbor’s dogs. He has two pitbulls that he keeps chained. They are usually chained in two different places and it looks to me as if they can’t reach each other. Now, they HAVE a fenced yard, but the gate is horrible. One side of the gate doesn’t reach to the other side of the gate, so when they close it, they have to attach another piece of what looks like horse fencing to close the gap. While I hate to see these guys tied up like that, I also do not want these pits to be able to get out of the fence and come attack me and/or my dog. The dogs usually bark like crazy when we walk past on the other side of the street, but at least the brown one has stopped lunging at us. I’m not a fan of pitbulls to begin with (don’t start with me, you pit lovers, you didn’t have a dog almost killed by one), but I do hate to see them tied up when the owners could simply do some maintenance on the fence so they could be free in their own yard. They have a little tiny dog as well that is usally in the house, but when the dog is outside, it often crosses the street in front of their house to go exploring. I don’t know the neighbors well, and wouldn’t feel comfortable talking to them about their dogs. My dog and I often walk that way, simply because the area behind the church is a great place to let my guy off-leash to let him run. (It’s a fairly secure “yard,” and it’s okay with the church. If you have any suggestions, I’d sure like to hear them.

    [Reply]

  42. mlou says:

    I will try the crate training again I have just recently put him on the bully and a stress … and over all he is a well behaved dog he… just turned one… reading about the ups or mail made me think of him … over and over … my mail lady jumped back 2 ft the other day delivering packages. He does know her on our walks and loves her… He will not allow any one in the house until I un crate him… he was a shelter pup at 1 month and when he was 3 weeks old my roommates dog attacked him we almost lost him … he had holes thru his cheeks and a whole rt by his eye and the one eye was drooping from the socket… it happened more than once, they are no longer here and he has been thru obedience classes and did pretty good and doing better as he gets older it is just the territoriality with me and the house,animals, ppl anything… he knows the crate so will and can go back to that but, somedays I am am gone up to 10 hrs hate leaving him in there that long with out food and water

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    pay someone to go and let him out and play with him on those days

    [Reply]

  43. Chris says:

    We rescued a dog over a year ago. We didn’t know his history. He attacked our neighbor yesterday. He has one puncture wound and rip on his arm. We figured things out after the fact. He doesn’t like being tied up or restrained on our property. He doesn’t like children either. Our neighbor had petted him before. He told me he did so while tired up too while I want there. I must have been in the barn with the horses. But yesterday he was on a double leash on our property (no where to go) and warned us by barking. He was protecting the other dog and myself. We LOVE him, but I don’t want to put anyone in danger.He wasn’t being provoked. The neighbor just wanted to pet them. He is fine with ppl off of our property even in a leash. The neighbor is not pressing charges. He is also fine in the house with others.U can write to gonethinkin@yahoo.com in case I can’t access this again. My We both want to keep him, but I want to be responsible. My husband said it was our faults. He was trying to warn us he would bite. He wants to keep him. What is your advice?

    [Reply]

  44. James says:

    I have a 1year old pit bull he loves people hes very loved by me and my children he like dog parks plays wirh other dogs walks well on his leash but soon as i tie him outside he trembles , shakes like hes cold , he wont eat can someone please help me help him . his name is maxx im james ,

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Don’t tie him out! Get a fence or a dog kennel run for outside

    [Reply]

  45. Aves says:

    Hi all! So I have 2 dog’s. A German Shepard and a german short hair. I have them both on 70 foot teathers most of the day. I am home all the time on weekends and gone a little but in weekdays, but spend tons of time with them both. They have food and water and shade. They are both really sweet dogs, and I don’t think tethering them aggressive, but they are a tiny bit dog aggressive. Is this why? I don’t have a fenced yard and don’t trust an electric fence. What other option do I have?! Thank you!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Yes, that would probably be why. I would get electric fence, leash walk them and keep them inside when you are gone. Many dogs strangle to death on tethers when unattended.

    [Reply]

  46. Mary Ann Gillis says:

    This is a good article on what not to do in the first place re: putting dogs on tie outs or whatever you want to call them.

    But where is the solution to correcting the obnoxious behavior if you get a rescue dog that has been chained outside for 5+ years? How do you fix all this anxiety over a totally new environment. Their life on a change might have been terrible but to be dumped in a shelter where everything is different and there aren’t enough people to property transition a dog. Now how as a new owner do you fix the aggression, barking, jumping etc. Please don’t tell me I have to buy ANOTHER one of your lessons!!!!!

    [Reply]

  47. Shelly says:

    We just adopted a dog from the shelter and he has been an extremely good dog. He does well with the crate and has had no accidents in the house at all. He seemed to do well with people also, until last night when he was outside on his tie-out (I was out with him) and a friend just happened to stop by. He got very aggressive with that person and did not seem to respond to instruction or discipline. Do you have any idea what would have caused him to act this way when he had showed no prior signs of aggressiveness? Any thoughts you could give would be greatly appreciated.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    He may have and has aggression issues. Without seeing the behavior I can’t really weigh in on that. I would recommend you take him to a veterinary behaviorist

    [Reply]

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