What to Do When Your Puppy Won’t Stop Crying in His Crate

Your puppy won’t stop crying in his crate? Recently, I have had a few questions from those of you that have crate whiners! I HATE whining! 

I can almost tolerate full out barking before I can tolerate the sound of whining. I guess it is the pitch and my tendency toward migraines but whining is one of my biggest pet peeves, so I completely understand! That’s why I ALWAYS train my dogs these 7 Brain RE-training Games  to teach them how to keep this impulse under control.

But, it is important to understand crate training from your dog’s stand point before we go much further!

What it’s Like for Your Dog

Most whining and crying comes from our pups when we try to crate train them. 

Understand that they come from a world where they lived with their mom and their littermates in a fairly confined space. They have never really experienced being all ALONE and it can be kind of scary, at first.

Dogs are den animals that is true, so acclimating to a crate is somewhat natural for dogs. However they are never “locked” in their dens. This inability to get out takes some acclimation and the understanding that nothing bad is going to happen to them in this new environment.

Most of our pets are spoiled.  We take our dogs with us and spend lots of time with them, catering to their every need; so they can be taken aback when we lock them up and leave them alone.

Crates are CRITICAL

But, crates are essential to the safety of your dog and your “stuff”. Read more about why to use a crate and crate games here in my article The Joys of Crate Training. I will always crate train my dogs. 

It makes them easier to travel with, because their home can travel with them, and it helps them with separation anxiety and anxiety at the groomer and the vet hospital. At some point almost ALL dogs will have to be crated or caged somewhere. Just last week I had to drop my dog off for x-rays and I know she was put in a kennel to await her turn!crate training takes patience

So it is crucial not to give up! Remember it is normal for your dog to protest and how you deal with these protests will set you up for a lifetime of loud protests if you are not careful!

What Do You Do?

When you crate train a pup PROPERLY, you have to make sure you know…

—  How to make your dog THINK his crate is his sanctuary… instead of a prison

—  Your dog’s AGE appropriate bladder holding time limits

—  The correct way handle excessive Crate Squawking, Barking or Whining

—  Problem solving

—  Plus a few other fun tricks and games that we’ll cover later.

So to make sure we get started off on the right foot crate training YOUR pup, here’s the first thing you have to know:

Getting Started, it’s Time to Purchase Your Crate

choose the right size crate for your dog

When you are thinking about crate training your pup and purchasing a crate I recommend getting a crate that will be big enough for your adult dog. Yes, your little guy is small now, but that won’t last forever. Unless you have oodles of money laying around, I would not necessarily get a crate the size of your pup and then continue to get bigger crates as he ages.

And, don’t think you aren’t going to need a crate when your dog is full grown, because crate training has its benefits throughout the lifetime of your dog! Instead I would recommend getting a crate big enough for your adult dog and partitioning it off to be smaller depending on the size of your pup. If the crate is TOOOO big, chances are your pup can have an accident at one end of the crate and lay at the other end, which mostly defeats the purpose of crate training.

For some specific guidelines checkout this resource

Next, determine which type of crate you would like to utilize. Crates come in all shapes and sizes, from plastic crates that are darker inside, to wire crates that allow the dog to see more, to steel or aluminum crates that are impossible to break out of and often used for police and working dogs. 

Most often I have found that dogs prefer the darker environment of a plastic crate as opposed to their wire crate counterparts.

Plus, when you crate at night, darker crates offer a more inviting space for your dog to cozy up and relax compared to those big open ones.

Dogs go into their crates because it’s a space to chill out in and take naps and a darker crate is usually more conducive to leaving the cares of the world behind. 

Fearful dogs often dislike wire crates because they feel trapped while being visually overstimulated by the outside world.

Puppies Are “Den” Based Animals Who Crave A Safe Place to Go

So when we do OUR job, as pet parents, and help our young puppies understand that their CRATE is a safe place that they can call their den, a WHOLE lot of wonderful behavior changes start to happen in your dog.

For starters, young puppies are taught by their mothers to NOT pee in their den. So when we create a den for them, it’s like we kick start a little evolutionary ingrained gene in their brains that tells them ‘NOT TO PEE in Their Crate’. 

Of course, there are limits to how long a pup can hold their bladder at different stages of life, that you have to abide by to make this happen; but as long as you follow the guidelines we’ll share with you later for how long to keep your pup in his crate.  If your dog loves his crate, he’ll hold it for as long as he physically can.

But therein lies the trick…

How Do You Get Your Pup to LOVE Going To His Crate?

Introducing “Den Training”!

Den Training is the process for how to get your pup to learn to LOVE his crate, and to treat it like his Mother’s Den. Here’s a quick summary of how to teach Phase I:

To Download a Printable Training Exercise Of The Whole Den Training Process Click Here

Fun and Games

First You Will Need to Make the Crate Inviting

  • A soft bed
  • Some new toys.
    You DO NOT have to leave these in the crate when you are not training (this may not be safe, because the dog or puppy may shred or potentially ingest them).  But it certainly makes a crate less scary and more inviting.

 

High Value Treats

 

Exploring the Crate

Click and treat for any interaction with the crate from looking at the crate to putting a body part inside. Remember to work at your dog’s pace and slowly raise the criteria. If you move too quickly he may become overwhelmed or lose interest. Yes, treat him for looking at the crate!

Next slowly change the criteria and click and treats him for:

  • Putting his full body in the crate
  • Sitting in the crate
  • Laying down in the crate
  • Choosing to stay in the crate

 

Close door and latch (click and treats)

Close door latch walk away (click and treats)

Release and reward the dog at intermittent times

Be patient

If your puppy dog tries to lunge through the door, latch and wait. Only staying inside receives reward. Reward can come from back of crate to keep dog from wanting to forge through. For example if my dog wants to race out when I open the door, I simply refuse to reward. 

Instead I hold the reward near the end of the crate, while I open the door.  If the dog stays inside he will get a jackpot.

Other Crate Training Games

“Race to Your Crate”

My dogs and I have this game, after I have shaped crate training, where I teach them to race into their crates on command. At my house, I say “Let’s go to bed!” and we have a race for them to get in their crates. As mentioned earlier, I don’t often even shut the door.

Sometimes I simply throw a treats or toy into their crate and then carry on about my day. Again in order for the dog to find this behavior rewarding, he must not always be locked in after he plays!

Toy Toss

I also making tossing toys into the crate a game.

My dogs love nothing more than toys and any game that revolves around toys, so by integrating their crate into games, I help to endear their crates to them. I toss toys inside for them to go and gather, and I also hide toys in their crates so that they can make fun discoveries inside.

In my opinion, there is no better way to help your dog enjoy his crate, than to hide a brand new toy inside!

It is all about finding fun in your dog’s crate training.

But I’ve Gotta WARN YOU!

Getting your puppy to think of his crate like his den is only the first step!

Once your puppy is feeling great about his crate it is time to get him comfortable with staying there for longer and longer periods of time without having separation anxiety. We will turn his crate into his “Happy Place” using a schedule.

A schedule like this can work well to get you started:

—  Once your dog is comfortable going into his crate to eat, close the crate door while he eats. Then, as soon as he’s done, open the crate door and let him out.

—  Next, throw a Kong toy in your dog’s crate and close the door. These can take longer to consume, so grab a magazine or just dedicate some time to checking out Facebook and sit within eyesight of your puppy while he eats his Kong in his crate (at least 5 minutes). Then open the door and let him out.

—  When your dog is okay eating his Kong for five minutes, with you in sight, for a day or two in a row, give him his Kong and leave for a minute or two. See if your dog can eat his Kong for 5 minutes with you out of sight (again, being sure to open the door and let him out after 5 minutes). Don’t try to push him to be in there too long, too fast, that can lead to isolation distress or separation anxiety. Once your dog is okay with a Kong for 5 minutes at a time without being able to see you, you’ve done a great thing! You’ve taught your dog to understand that he’s not being abandoned, and that you always come back to let him out. Once your dog is comfortable in his crate, we need to train him how to handle hours at a time.

—  To teach your dog to be in his crate when you have to leave him at home for hours, start by randomizing how long you leave him in his crate. For example, leave him for 5 min, 10 min, 3 min, 12 min, 15 min, 1 min, 16 min, etc. Do you see what I’m doing? I’m slowly increasing the periods of time that I ask the dog to go into his crate two times in a row, but on the third time, I let him out really quickly. This strategy for increasing the length of time your dog waits to be let out, which we call “Random Rewarding”, keeps the dog guessing as to when he’ll be let out. And, it is much better than simply increasing the time your dog has to be in the crate each day. Do this until you can leave your dog in his crate up to an hour at a time.

 When you see your dog sleeping through the night in his crate, you know he is totally comfortable with his crate. Sleeping takes up nearly half of an older dog’s daily activities, so it’s a perfect thing to condition your dog to do in his crate.

Crate Training Puppies Overnight

This process is usually fairly simple. I recommend putting the crate next to the side of your bed so that you can hear him if he gets restless and needs to go outside. Being right next to your bed also allows him to hear you breathe, which can help him adjust quicker and will curb the crying at night. 

Remember that your pup just came from sleeping with his mother and a whole litter of other pups, he is used to hearing the other pups heartbeat and breath throughout the night, although sleeping in a crate might be difficult and foreign at first being by your side will help him adapt faster.

Puppies sleep longer at night, so he can be left in his crate for longer than the standard 3 hours that are recommended, but you must keep an ear out for his fidgeting. To make this process easier on both of you, I suggest taking water up 2 hours prior to bedtime and going out for a potty break with your pup last thing before you go to bed at night. Stay on a schedule! Dogs adapt more readily to situations that are predictable and they like being on a normalized schedule.

Holding It

Once your puppy is trained to go into his crate WILLINGLY, now you start to teach your puppy to “HOLD IT” while in his crate for longer and longer periods of time.  Thais becomes HUGE when it comes time to teaching our puppy how to warn us that he has to go later on this in the potty training process.

But for now…

We want to use the power of a dog’s UNWILLINGNESS to pee in his den to our advantage by containing a puppy in one spot for a period of time.

But here’s the trick…

We need to teach the puppy how to hold it a little longer than he wants to, but not so long that we’re becoming abusive. So what we’ve created for you is a chart that helps show you how long your dog should be left in his crate at a time.  This chart shows you not only how to tell how long your dog can currently be left in his crate, but how to adapt those time lengths to your puppy as he ages.

Plus by following this schedule you will INCREASE the amount of time your dog is willing to be in his crate without soiling it by 30 minutes every week.

Feel free to print off this chart and attach it to your fridge so the whole family can be on the same crate training schedule.

Problem solving… or Ways Your Crate Training Efforts May Have Failed

I get a lot of questions either asked of me in person, online, via email etc. And one of my biggest fixes for many things is utilizing a crate. Crates help with potty training, they help with chewing, they help give your dog a haven when he needs to get away and they help to give you some sanity when you need a break from watching your puppy or dog.

They also keep you safe in your car, and allow you to stay in motels that otherwise don’t allow dogs. In addition, they can keep friends and family happy when you visit; since they know your dog will be taken care of and well behaved at their home. But one of the most common responses after I suggest crate training is:

“My dog won’t crate train” or “My dog hates the crate”

And, most likely either way; you are simply doing it wrong. And if you’d like to see how I’d do that RIGHT, I made these videos.

And, by doing it wrong you are allowing your dog to choose whether or not he wants to be in a crate; and let me tell you that in the beginning 96% of dogs would choose to skip the crate training even though they will also be happier in the end if they learn to love a crate.

You Only Crate Him When You Leave

Think about this, crating becomes a precursor to what he hates the most… being separated from you. Even if you crate him at night and then again only when you leave he begins to associate the two things…  Plus chances are he is spending large amounts of time in his crate. He needs to understand that he may only be in his crate for 15 minutes or less if he is good and quiet and you can’t always offer that to him when you leave.

In order to have successful crate training you must do it occasionally during the day while you are home. And, in the beginning you need to do it several times a day in order to teach him and play with him appropriately in the crate. The crate isn’t some kind of torture to be dealt when you leave, it needs to be his safe place and his house; but in order for him to think his house is cool he needs you to be around, needs to know he can be let out after short durations and needs to know you are not always going to leave him alone in his crate.

 

Puppies Should Love their Crates!

 

You Let Him out When He Throws a Fit

You let him out when he screams, it is pretty simple if you think about it. Trust me I understand; it is hard to listen to your puppy scream or throw a fit. 

No one likes it! But by letting him out when he screams or barks you are teaching him to scream and bark in his crate and this is counter intuitive to having a well behaved and crate trained dog.

Like many parents believe older babies (not tiny babies) need to get used to whining themselves to sleep and soothing themselves; so does your puppy or your dog. He needs to understand he isn’t going to die when you put him in his crate and if you let him out when he squawks he is never going to overcome his fear or dislike of his crate. And, in order to be let out, he needs to learn that being quiet in his kennel is what you want.

So if you are in the beginning stages of crate training then remember to let him out a few seconds after he is quiet.

HINT:  If you tire him out by playing with him before you leave put him in his crate, he won’t scream as long, he will be tired so he will learn to nap in his crate.

I always exhaust my puppies before I put them in their crates so they learn to sleep when they are in there.  They are way too tired to scream for more than a minute or two.  Even if you have to get up an hour early or stay up a little later, make sure you put a tired puppy in the crate.

You Never Played Games with His Crate

You never played games in his crate with him, don’t worry most people don’t know this trick. In order for your dog or your puppy to learn the true “gift” and “joy” of a crate he needs to have happy moments in there, not just barking and screaming himself to sleep. You need to teach him that being in his crate is fun and that comes with crate interaction.

95% of the time I give my dog a big, magnificent cookie when they go in their crates, plus I often feed them in their crates so they run into their crates at least twice a day thinking they are going to get a great reward. This helps to change the association with the crate from bad to good. Heck I might consider going into a crate if someone gave me a brownie or a bag of Cheetos every time!

You Locked Him in it With No Training

Dogs need to learn how to control their environment to be successful and to be happy and for them to do that or feel like they can do that you need to teach them what you want or trick them into doing what YOU want them to do (otherwise they are training you).

For example, if you want your dog to enjoy his crate and learn to control when he is in it you must teach him that when he is quiet he can get out of his crate.  If you only close him in his crate when you leave and let him out when you come home you aren’t teaching him anything but to dislike his confined space when you are gone.

Training requires you to be home and for him to be in his crate for short durations as long as he is quiet. As with anything, crate training takes time and effort. In order to set your dog up for success, you must spend time training. Spend time working on it several times during the day so you can change the way he feels about his crate and he learns to be quiet and take peaceful naps in there.

 

Your Dog’s Crate Should be his Favorite Spot!

 

You Rarely Use It

The other reason that a lot of dogs are not successful with crate training is because many people rarely use it.

People stay home with their dogs during the day or they put them in baby gated rooms because they think the dog likes that better (but dogs are den animals) and rarely get crated. Or as the dog gets older the people move from using a crate to leaving the dog out in the house during the day; and so the crate is rarely used.

In order for a dog to stay current with his crate training, you have to do it periodically. Even though 2 out of 3 of my dogs are able to stay loose in the house when I leave, I still occasionally put them in their crates. I never know when I might need to train or go somewhere that they will need to be crated, so it is in my best interests and theirs to keep them up to date with their crates and their crate training.

But overall make it as positive and fun as you possibly can!  There are going to be some fits, that is normal but how you deal with them is the most important!  Remember you are the stronger smarter animal 😉

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Comments

  1. Lori says:

    what do you do when they whine at 3am? my puppy doesnt need to do its business, she just wants to be with me.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    If you are absolutely sure she doesn’t need out, ignore her and wait for her to fall asleep again. If you let her out to be with you she learns to whine when she wants something from you.

    [Reply]

    inez Reply:

    GRRRR!!!!, my partner goes to the bathroom @ 3:30, I get to get up with the whining puppy!!!!!
    So while my puppy, Ciera lays on her pillow beside me, I am reading up on what to do with a WHINING, crate training puppy.
    Thanks for the info. Maybe tonight, I will have to try her crate in the basement with a radio.
    Thanks,

    Inez

    [Reply]

    Cristina Reply:

    I don’t know if this will help you, but my Chihuahua was three months old when my friend gave her to me, (she is now 5 months). The first two days of having her (she was brought to me from Miami, and I live in California) she was waking up 3, 4 in the morning, so I bought a crate on the third day at Petco, and I noticed that there was a crate cover for sale there too.

    So I bought the crate and crate cover, and she hasn’t soiled her crate and she sleeps through the night. This is success for me, because my husband comes home from work at 4AM, where as the first two days, my puppy would wake up at any noise and start whining, she does not since I put the crate cover over the crate at night.

  2. I have a 6 year old female dog who was rescued from a puppy mill, went to a “forever home” for a year but it didn’t work out so now she is truly in her “forever home”. The problem is severe separation anxiety. I have tried to leave her in her crate, the laundry room, the kitchen and now back to her crate. She pees and poops and runs around in it. When in the kitchen she would pee and poop and run in it back + forth inside the baby gate. A couple of times she even caused bleeding from the pads of her feet. I understand she is an older dog and probably had to do this in the puppy mill. Also I always walk her before I leave and make sure she has peed and pood before I leave. I think she has ibs b/c when I go to put her in her crate her tummy starts rumbling. Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    This is very difficult because panic attacks and separation anxiety are very different than regular crate training. They sincerely have a phobic reaction and so it is not easily dealt with.

    This type of desensitization training can take a very long time.

    For now I would recommend taking her to the vet so that they can help her with a sedative or anti-anxiety medication while you work on the problem. Think about it…if you were terrified of spiders (for example) you would care a little less that they were in the room if you had some really good valium in your blood stream. You want to be able to calm her when it is time to work on crate training. Then I would play crate games and only leave her in for brief periods of time while you are home so she can acclimate to it while you are around. Make the crate part of your living room and I would get one of these military dog crates so she can’t injure herself. http://www.gundogsupply.com/impact-stationary-aluminum-dog-crate-large.html?utm_medium=shoppingengine&utm_source=googlebase&cvsfa=2266&cvsfe=2&cvsfhu=494d504143542d53544154494f4e4152592d414c554d494e554d2d444f472d43524154452d4c41524745

    And when you leave her for a while until she is acclimated and doing well, I would recommend a doggy day care facility where she won’t be caged and can play.

    [Reply]

    Carol Reply:

    Stephanie I want to thank you and congratulate on rescuing a puppy mill dog. I also had adopted a dog that was from a puppy mill years ago. Unfortunately puppy mills expect their dogs to live in soiled crates. Something that helped me was when she pooped and peed outside I would make a big deal of what a good girl she was for going potty outside, when I started I would bring treats with me and tell her good girl and give her a treat. Of course you can’t punish her for the mess inside. But when you can come to her area and find that she hasn’t messed it make sure you tell her how good she is. It will help. It will take a while but positive training is the best.

    [Reply]

  3. shdows says:

    It is the best tip for learn about puppy,Thank you.

    [Reply]

  4. Sue says:

    My Bull Mastiff Nyia will sleep in her create without difficulty. but sometimes she will have an accident inside the create. This only happens so often,but I was wondering did you ever hear this happening when the dog should know this is there den? She is big already and I had to open the area more for her. I heard that you can put the sperate area in the cage so she only has room to turn. She is going to be 4 months on Feb. 17th….I thank you for your time… Sue

    [Reply]

    terry Reply:

    I have a Doberman puppy that kept p’ing in her crate. I’d take her outside, she’d p, and then put her in her crate, and she might p in there 10 minutes later. I finally partitioned the crate off so she had only room to turn around and lay down. First 10 minutes she p’d in there, but must have learned from that, as she never p’d in her crate again. As she has grown, (now 4 months) I adjust the partition to give her just a little more room, and then a little more. Now she has complete freedom in her crate. It was very frustrating because normally any puppy I crate trained, caught on fairly soon. She is very intelligent, but just must have thought it was ok p’ing in her crate, as she had LOTS of room until I partitioned it off.

    [Reply]

  5. Gloria says:

    My 10 week old lab/collie is doing well in the crate, but a few times she has peed. I try and make sure I take her out, but I think Im leaving her out too often, will that teach her not to hold her bladder for a few hours because I take her out almost every hour. I don’t understand since she knows where to go outside, that she doesnt let me know when she has to go, no whimper, barking or anything like that. Also I have a question what stops a pup from biting, nipping and jumping…I have tried saying no with a firm voice, putting her in crate when she does that, tapping her nose and now I roll up a magazine and smack in on the FLOOR real hard to distract but none of these are working, could you give me any advice. Thank you,

    [Reply]

    Barb Reply:

    Gloria – your puppy is only 10 weeks old. They can’t hold their full bladder more than a couple of hours! Continue taking her outside to the same spot every 1 1/2 to two hours. Be sure to praise her when she goes outside, but don’t yell at her or punish her when she has an accident. And if you put her in the crate as a punishment (for the nipping, etc.), she’ll never do well in it……..
    Try distracting her when she does the biting, nipping thing – mine have always grown out of it. Good luck.

    [Reply]

    Karen Reply:

    Barb I had the same problem with my Westie Maggie. I new that she new where to go but would not say anything, very frustrating so I tied some xmas bells on a ribbon just out of her reach.. Every time we took her out we shook the bells .By the end of the week she was jumping up ringing the bells herself.I have not had a single accident since. I just keep moving them up higher as she grows so she can”t grab them with her teeth, just hit them with the tip of her toes..Try it you will be surprised, I was thrilled with the result..sincerely Karen.

    [Reply]

  6. Mary says:

    I have a 10 year old Yorkie that started living with me last year. She is very comfortable with her crate. She willingly goes to bed in her crate at night just fine, and even chooses to sleep there in the evenings with the door open instead of sitting with me. I take her outside at 11pm before bed and get her up around 7 or 8 am.
    The problem is every night she starts barking in her crate around 4 or 5am. I try ignoring her barking in the morning, but she will carry on for HOURS. I tell her “no” but she still does not stop, banging on the crate does not work either. She also does this behavior when I crate her and leave the house for a few hours. When I come home she is barking and screaming in her crate.
    So eventually she wins, and if I don’t let her out she will pee in the crate.
    How do I teach this old dog a new trick?
    Thanks for you help!

    [Reply]

  7. Patricia says:

    My Finian is a one-year old Yellow Lab mix. He does great in the crate, but I want to be able to wean him out of being crated. The problem is that he will start grabbing things (off the table, counters, etc.) What do you suggest to teach him to stop dong that? I will so appreciate your answers! Finian will too.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    teach him leave it! http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/skill-save-dogs-life-leave/

    And, in my opinion you can’t begin to think about leaving him out of his crate until he has completely stopped grabbing things. Otherwise he could grab or ingest something dangerous!

    But when he is ready, you start slow…5 minutes then check on him, 10, 20 etc until you know it is safe to leave him.

    [Reply]

  8. Renata says:

    Just wanted to say thank you. I read this when I first got my chiweeney puppy @ 8 weeks old & instantly started training Corkee. He is now 4 months & all I have to say when it’s time for bed, company is over or we sit down for a meal is; kennel up. Loving it & I know he’s happy & content. Thanks again.

    [Reply]

  9. Rita Yancy says:

    Thanks for your wonderful advice on whinning I will try the frozen items with peanutbutter.

    [Reply]

  10. Heather B says:

    I will try stopping the Cheerios in the am but Betty isn’t like other dogs
    she doesn’t poop after she eats, so its very hard to predict when she has
    to go. Like she ate her dinner last night around 6 and she never pooped. I
    fed her breakfast this am and gave her a little less food and she didn’t
    poop before I left for work. I’m not sure at 6 months old she understands
    what I’m talking about when I tell her to go poop. I’m so very
    frustrated!!!! It would be so much easier if she would poop 20 minutes to a
    half hour after she eats.

    [Reply]

    gene selner Reply:

    Heather you need to
    set a schedule
    you may need to allow more time to exercise Betty
    she needs to be rewarded for DOING HER JOB
    Betty needs to learn this is her job
    All family members need to help
    you need to watch Betty and determine when she is ready for potty
    I recommend to my students if their dog wont potty I instruct them to return
    the dog to their crate for a time out and then try again after 15 minutes or
    so. it may take longer.
    Betty may not be ready as you would like
    if Betty doesn’t comply,potty time may be the responsibility for husbands,
    children, trusted neighbors or dog walker
    remember we can’t predict we need to HELP the situation

    [Reply]

    gene selner Reply:

    Odalys you need to
    your puppy wants ATTENTION
    you need to find a good obedience school and you must learn how to be the alpha dog
    coming from the shelter the dog always whined and it was never taught good obedience
    if you dont take the lead and become ALIFA your dog will
    dogs sense if you dont take the lead they will
    a good obedience school will monitor your progress and guide you on a weekly basis

    GOOD LUCK

    [Reply]

  11. Odalys says:

    My dog is now 7 months old. It took me a while to potty train on “pads” but I have FINALLY been successful.however, his whining is driving me crazy. he whines if I go to another room, even when he sees me he continously whines. I took him to the vet he is healthy. He is from a shelter, i am so frustrated. I want to keep him.. i love this dog..any advice would be helpful.

    [Reply]

    Rebecca Jones Reply:

    Hi there,

    I have a 7 month old cavapoo- who stopped crying a couple of weeks into crate training but since being spayed last week, she’s been crying frantically.

    We’ve never caved in but last night, she was so hysetrical, we could hear the neighbours were complaining 🙁

    We brought her to the bedroom and she slept in her bed (not crate- she refused to stay quiet) on the floor.

    It’s really getting me down and the neighbours are getting frustrated. My husband and I would be OK to let her cry and the neighbours are the problem. We bought them wine, eye masks and ear plugs to say thank you for dealing with her.

    Her crate also has a couple of her toys, a blanket with my scent on it, we give her a small treat when she goes into the crate- so she’s always happy to go in. It’s just that 5 mins after we leave her, she starts yelping for 2-3 hours at a time.

    We even warm up her bed with a hot water bottle, have a ticking clock, the crate has blankets over it – all of which have worked a treat in the past but she’s just lost the plot.

    Help! 🙁

    Thank you,

    Bec

    P.S Did your dog get any quieter?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    She needs really strenuous exercise prior to you putting her into her crate, if she is tired she will sleep.

    [Reply]

  12. maria says:

    Hello i have read so many articles on how to break my dog out of having a screaming fit that i don’t know what else to do….please help!

    I have a 5 month chiwinnie got her when she was 3 months she sleeps in her creat just fine when I’m home. But if I leave for a couple of hours and she has to go in her creat she has this total melt down and I’ve tried leving on a radio, chew bones, kongs with her favroit treat and nothing works for her. I live in a town-house and dont want to wake my neighbors up with her very loud screaming match that she carries on. I’ve tried putting her in for a few mintues at a time and letting her screaming and going in and telling her to stop, but when i walk aways she starts again.

    I’m at the point that i want to buy a bark coller, but feel so bad to use that on her.

    Please help thank you!

    Maria

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Exercise her until she is too tired to want to bark. A 3 mile run or more should leave her tired enough that she doesn’t notice when you leave, then you can slowly begin to desensitize her to leaving!

    [Reply]

  13. Amanda says:

    I’m wondering if dogs can be clostrophobic? No matter what I do, how much I praise or try to get him to see that his crate should be a comfy hidey-hole, and no matter how tired he is, my lhasachon freaks out in his crate, or any closed space for that matter! At the groomers, there is a little chamber they put the dogs in to slowly dry them. He hates it! He got himself into the bathroom and somehow pushed the door shut, and I heard his frantic crying through my loud music! And his breathing gets so fast and labored, it sounds like he is hyperventilating or something, not to mention the shakes he gets! Please help?

    [Reply]

  14. Leila says:

    I have a 4 year old bichon frise who we are attempting to crate train. We solved his previous “problems” with being left alone and we thought crate training might be best next as he has marked his territory once or twice where our bitch pup has gone. He loves the crate. will sleep in it and lie in it when it’s in the room with us but less inclined when it is placed in the hallway. Furthermore, when we shut the cage door (which we have tried building up to it for example when he is eating, he goes in his crate and we shut him in and he is quite happy to do this) and we give him treats etc. Yet when we just tried to put him in there for 20 minutes (where it is currently based in the hallway) he decided to try crying and then waiting to hear us, then crying again and possibly some digging at the floor. what should I do to try and make it more comfortable for him?

    [Reply]

  15. Leila says:

    I have a 4 year old bichon frise who we are attempting to crate train. We solved his previous “problems” with being left alone and we thought crate training might be best next as he has marked his territory once or twice where our bitch pup has gone. He loves the crate. will sleep in it and lie in it when it’s in the room with us but less inclined when it is placed in the hallway. Furthermore, when we shut the cage door (which we have tried building up to it for example when he is eating, he goes in his crate and we shut him in and he is quite happy to do this) and we give him treats etc. Yet when we just tried to put him in there for 20 minutes (where it is currently based in the hallway) he decided to try crying and then waiting to hear us, then crying again and possibly some digging at the floor. what should I do to try and make it more comfortable for him? He also has no interest in toys or treats(which I am wary about leaving him alone with anyway) and his interest in treats isn’t quite great either.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    If he doesn’t like being in the hallway, I would move him to where he is comfortable.

    Then I would put the radio on and leave him and go do something else where he can’t hear you and you won’t worry about him. Do some yard work, run a short errand and after a bit of crying I bet he will figure it out!

    Just don’t let him out when he is crying!

    [Reply]

  16. Leila says:

    We solved this problem now. My next concern is, though he is fantastic in the crate, we have yet to lock him in it when we actually leave the house. I am considering a Kong to keep him occupied when we finally do lock him in (as he is usually good but we caught him barking late the other night when we had to pop out) but I am thinking of getting the Xtreme Kong for the more excessive chewers out there (Charlie doesn’t chew at all apart from my sister’s felt pens and pencil case) but I wouldn’t like the thought of leaving him with something he could easily chew and swallow. He doesn’t like toys at all so the Kong would only serve the purpose of the treat part which I was thinking frozen peanut butter to keep him both occupied and safe as opposed to giving him a bone he could choke on. My other question was do you also think it wise to get a bigger Kong than his jaw size as I have heard some dog owners have found the Kong stuck on the dog’s jaw. Do you also think like me that the Xtreme Kong should hold up for the little guy? (He is a bichon frise and as I said, he doesn’t chew anything.) Thanks for your feedback and I hope you could help me with these questions as we want my little guy to be safe and quiet/content when I leave.

    [Reply]

  17. I have a foster dog, who does not get along with my current dog and also has no boundaries when it comes to what she wants to chew on. So, even though I work from home during the day, I cannot let her out of the crate without 100% supervision. The problem is that I work in the room where her crate is located (otherwise it would be in the living room with my other dog.) The foster dog will whine and bark on occasion, even when I give her kongs with peanut butter, and regular exercise every three or four hours. I will leave the room if she barks, and she will settle down after a few minutes, but this really breaks up my working routine and she will still bark several times a day. Do you have any advice?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Exchange crate locals if you need to!

    [Reply]

  18. jessica says:

    Hi we just got a 9 week old golden doodle…i’ve gotten him to sit and come to me..hes really good all day but as soon as we put him in his crate he cries and barks…he sleeps great for the first 2 hours and then i take him out to potty..i take him back to his crate (which is beside of our bed) and he screams and cries this happens every time i take him out and put him in (about every 2 hours during the night)…my husband is about ready to give up on this puppy…im not…we say no and we dont let him out unless he stops crying..is there anything else we can do…please help this is going on the 5th night of no sleep and we have 3 little girls and a 2 month old baby boy..i need some sleep lol…thanks

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Put him somewhere you can’t hear him.

    Put a radio on for him.

    Give him a big tshirt to lay on that smells like you (as long as he won’t chew it)

    exercise him before bedtime

    and set an alarm for about 4 hours so you can let him out to potty.

    [Reply]

    Danielle Reply:

    We have an 8 week old golden doodle. My dad and I keep him busy playing before bedtime. We take his water up 3 hours before bedtime. He will sleep about 4 hours and then we take him outside to do his business. He does great on that part! When we bring him back inside he whines and barks to get out of his crate. Everything we have read says not to reward his bad behavior by letting him out. My dad is getting no sleep and is getting frustrated with the puppy. Eventually we can get him back to sleep, but for just a short time. We have music playing for him and it does not seem to help. He likes to take frequent naps during the daytime, rather than sleep at night. When we put him outside during the day for a short period of time he does not like being left alone. He will come whine and bark at the door to come back inside. Any advice would be welcome.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    More exercise during the day and less naps in the evening and at night.

    I put a crate next to my bed so my puppy can hear me and I can also tell him/her to be quiet.

    I also allow my puppies to chew safe chewies or play with safe toys in their crates if I want some extra sleep… but sometimes you just need to allow your puppy to play and run off some steam.

    Treat the puppy the same as you would a baby.

    [Reply]

    MelissaMathis Reply:

    We have a 7 week old goldendoodle and we’re experiencing the same thing. She only cries for a couple minutes when we first put her in her crate but after taking her to the potty and putting her back into her crate, she’ll cry for hours! Her crate is in a different room and she’s got a few toys with her. She’s just ready to play. Will this go away as she matures with age? We don’t reward her by getting her out of the crate, but once she’s quiet, we’ll get her out to potty or be up for the day… We need help! Hah we’re going on the 4th night of this.

    [Reply]

  19. Robin says:

    I have a 8 week old Mini Aussie. I am trying to crate train at night and for a few hours during the day when there is a overlap in schedules where there is nobody home. It is day five of him being home with us. I was told that each day would get a little better, but its the exact opposite. He is getting louder and is crying even longer. We have tried giving him a good romp right before bed to wear him out and giving him a special crate treat but neither seems to work. He will completely ignore the treat and when we think he is exhausted, as soon as the crate door is shut his a wide awake and louder than ever. My fiance is paranoid that the neighbors are going to hear him (we live in a townhouse) How long have this night of screaming puppy will there be until he finally accepts that the crate is his place at bedtime? Any advise would be greatly appreciated.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    All puppies are different. Try more exercise! Also you can try putting the crate right next to the bed and tapping on it when he is loud. This way he knows he is not alone.

    You can also try putting him somewhere with a really loud radio so he can’t hear you and it should lull him to sleep.

    You will have to try different things and wait for him to figure it out… which I bet he will do pretty quickly!

    [Reply]

  20. Diane says:

    I have neighbors (whom I don’t really know at all) who keeps their schnauzer puppy (about 8 months old?) in a crate in the garage all day. Sometimes the garage door is opened a few inches but not always. I rarely see the family outside playing with the dog, but every once in a while I will see them letting the dog out on a leash to potty. They have another small dog who lives in the house and who gets much more attention. I did happen to talk to the neighbor once and asked about the dog and she admitted that she had a hard time controlling him and he does “live” in the garage crate. I don’t know if this living condition is acceptable for a puppy or if, as a dog owner/lover, I am being just overly sympathetic because this dog barks and whines a lot. I am tempted to leave an anonymous note in her mailbox with suggestions of dog training locations, dog walkers, etc. or should I just leave it alone? This is really upsetting to me as I see my animals as part of my “pack family” and it seems cruel to leave a dog in a garage when the temperature outside reaches 98 degrees. Thanks – I appreciate any advice on this!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    This is completely up to you. Giving training information certainly would not hurt.

    If you think the dog is not adequately taken care of your other resource is animal control.

    [Reply]

  21. Ally says:

    We have a 10-month old pointer/lab mix that we got from the shelter about 2 weeks ago. Unfortunately, the shelter had us pick her up on a Tuesday (not over the weekend like we had planned) and being that my husband and I both had to work the next day, there wasn’t much time to get her used to her crate. She will go in it willingly when she knows we won’t lock her in, but as soon as she knows we’re leaving or going to bed she freaks out: She won’t go in her crate by herself, we essentially have to put her in it. Then she barks, whines, and pants for about an hour every night before finally calming down. She has her chew toy, and we go on a 1-2 mile run every night after work to try to tire her out. The first week she was fine, but a few nights ago the barking got really bad. She also started tearing up her blanket (but she seems ok with her dog bed). I’ve even tried putting her in her crate 30 minutes before we go to bed, to get her calm before we go upstairs. It works until the minute she stops hearing our voices, then the barking starts up.

    Any suggestions would be appreciated!! I can ignore it and sleep through it, but it hits a nerve with my husband and drives him crazy!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Try more exercise. 2 miles may be a lot for you but is probably not much at all for a sporting breed. Try running more intervals, or longer, or a game of fetch.

    By leaving things that can be shredded in her crate you are at risk that she is going to eat them. I would not leave a bed or a blanket in there… not right now.

    Instead I would try a sterile bone stuffed with peanut butter or a Kong something that can’t be readily eaten but something that can be chewed on when she is nervous.

    And I would put a radio in the room you are leaving her in, or let her sleep in your bedroom next to the bed so she can hear you and know she is not alone.

    Also work on crate training more often for shorter durations. Right now she probably associates being in her crate with LONG periods of time and so she is more likely to panic. If she thinks it might only be 10 minutes or less she will probably settle easier.

    [Reply]

  22. Kristin says:

    My dog is 4 years old. She is a German Sheppard Border Collie Cross. I have recently (3 months or so) started crate training her. She was becoming the spoiled wicked witch, and acting out big time so it was suggested to me to crate trsin. Anyway the first couple months went well I started just short sessions now we are at a point where she is in there all night. Just recently in the past 2 weeks she has started high pitched barking, whining & crying ALL NIGHT long, all night. I am expecting a baby in a week so I really want to cut this out as soon as possible. I have tried chew toys, raw hides things like that she wont touch them in there, every morning there is always a full unchewed rawhide and toy. She pants excessively, the bottom of her cage is absolutely covered in drool ( which is not normal for her she was fine the last 2 months ). I did have a dog bed in there until she started peeing on it every morning so that got taken out, and she hasnt peed in the cage again since. Are this behaviour issues I am having with her because she senses the baby coming or is she just hard headed and mad because I have laid down the law finally. I have had her since a pup and the worst she would do was maybe get into the garbage, the last 5 months or so shes been pure bad. There is no other words for it. Please help with the whining cage situation, I need my sleep my family needs their sleep and my newborn child on the way will need her sleep.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    My guess is it is the change… however having the baby may not make it better!

    She needs exercise good HARD exercise!!!

    Read this article and do this about an hour before bed so that she is tired and readily sleeps.

    You might also try putting the crate in your room so she can be with you and hear you as you sleep. It can be terrifying to be separated all alone and not understand why?

    [Reply]

  23. Rebekah says:

    We have a new 8 week old GSP. She is fine in her crate at night (only whines for about 2 minutes before she goes to sleep), and is fine during the day when we are in the room. But as soon as we leave the room she SCREAMS!! She will go on and on for over 2 hours. I know she’s still young, but we need to fix this ASAP as neither of us can be home all day and we live in a condo, so we can’t disturb our neighbors. She has a blanket which she loves, a couple toys, a kong with peanut butter, music, and she also gets plenty of exercise… nothing’s working. How can we fix this?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    She needs exercise before you put her in her crate and she also needs you to teach her while you are home.

    Crate her and leave her in her crate while you are home after she has had some exercise and is ready to crash but in another room. She will probably scream for a minute or two and then eventually be quiet… then you are there to let her out.

    Puppies this old can only be safely crated for about 3 hours before they need out for exercise and potty so I hope she isn’t going longer than this during the day!

    [Reply]

  24. Rebekah says:

    Yes, we do exercise her before we put her in her crate. And she goes out every two hours or so. We do have help when we cannot be home. We will continue to crate her during the day while we are home – hopefully this works! Her little cries are so sad!! Thank you Minette!

    [Reply]

  25. Chrissy says:

    Alright, puppy crate training question here:

    We ended up adopting an unplanned, approximately 5 month old, stray dog about 4 weeks ago. We got a crate immediately for him, and that first night was pretty rough. He probably cried for 30-45 minutes, but did eventually settle in. We were very careful to ignore him and let him figure it out on his own. The next day I bought a Kong, stuffed it with peanut butter, froze it, and gave it to him at bedtime. We also pulled the sheet over his crate back so he could see us in bed. This seemed to help a lot, and he was content to get all the peanut butter and only cried for 5 minutes afterwards.

    For the past 4 weeks, our nights have been pretty much like this. Sometimes he cries for a little longer after finishing the Kong, and there has been once where he woke up to cry in the middle of the night (we took him out and he cried for a bit longer afterwards, eventually settling in).

    House training while we’re there has been pretty good. For the first week or so we kept him on a leash and always next to us so we could correct the behavior immediately if he tried to go in the house. Since then he’s only had 2 or 3 accidents in the house, each time was when we stopped watching him like a hawk. Once was because we went out our back door for a minute to get something from our storage unit (he’d never seen us walk out the door without him before), and the other two we were busy making dinner or looking for something in a closet. We were able to trace each accident back to our mistakes, and didn’t make a big deal out of them. We know he knows he should go potty outside, but we still keep him with us if he’s out of the crate, so he’s never really been allowed to be away from us (if he goes to wander into another room, we call him back).

    So, the big issue is crating him during the day- Our schedules are all over the place, which is admittedly part of the problem. I work 12+ hour days, and my boyfriend is gone for 9 hours. Between my boyfriend and I’s schedules, the puppy is generally left alone for roughly 6-8 hours. We have a friend come and walk him midway through the day. The longest he’s ever been left in the crate is 4 hours.

    So there have been 2 problems- #1 He cries when he leave. We’ve tried putting him in the crate for short periods of times with a delicious treat while we’re home, but he just ignores the treat and cries. We used to keep a sheet over the wire crate and a towel on the floor but he promptly ripped the sheet through and tore up the towel, so now we don’t have anything on or inside. Issue #2 He has also urinated in the crate roughly 5 times and defecated 3 (once was diarrhea, so you can’t really count it). The last time he had an accident in the crate, he had just been outside and was only in for 15 minutes with a treat (I was home). We have the crate divider up so he doesn’t have much room in there- only enough to stand/turn around/lay down.

    Admittedly, since we weren’t expecting to adopt a puppy, and we still had to work we were not able to fully crate train him before we had to leave him in there the first time. We’ve tried to take a few steps backwards and make sure he only gets the *really* good treats (i.e. peanut butter) while he’s in there, but he’s still stressed when we leave. We got another crate (a plastic airline one instead of a wire one) that we’re keeping in the living room and we’re taking it VERY slow with that crate. We’re encouraging him to go in and out with treats and clicks, and we haven’t closed the door yet. We’re hoping that we can successfully crate train him in the airline crate and he won’t associate bad feelings with it because it is so different than the wire crate. Obviously all of this takes time, and we’re still having to crate him in the wire crate while we’re at work, and he’s still screaming.

    There is a doggy daycare place near our condo that we’ve been thinking about taking him to for a few hours in the morning and then having the dog walker pick him up around lunch so he’s wiped out during the afternoon (which will hopefully cut down on the crate anxiety), but its so expensive…

    So I guess I’m just asking for any other suggestions/insights/etc. This has been going on now for about 4 weeks, and we’re trying everything we can, but it doesn’t seem like the separation anxiety has gotten any better. Again, he’s so stressed by our leaving him during the day that he’ll completely ignore goodies he’d normally love.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    He needs more exercise. I would invest in day care and play time as it will give you sanity!!

    He needs to have his exercise regimented and met before you go and if you can’t exhaust him then he needs to go to daycare for his mental sanity.

    [Reply]

  26. Jen says:

    Hi

    I just got a boxer/mastiff mix, about 9/10 months old. My aunt had him for a few weeks before me and when she crated him he would whine. I got him and he does the same thing. I got him some herbal dog anxiety stuff and it seems to help a bit but last night I left him for about 3 hours and I recorded him. About every hour he whines for about 5 minutes. My concern is that it’ll irritate my neighbors. I’ve followed all the suggestions on acclimating him to the crate-feeding him in it, rewarding small amounts of time in it, putting toys in it, leaving a radio on, exercising before going in. I realize it’ll take some time, I’ve only had him a week, but was curious if you had any idea of how long he will be whining. He is the sweetest, calmest, and, dare I say, laziest dog! I’ve never heard him make a noise unless he’s in the crate. I work from home so don’t leave him in it often but for the last few days have tried to leave him in it for at least an hour so he knows this is part of life here. Any advice or estimates on when he’ll be more comfortable with it?

    Thanks!!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    exercise, exercise, exercise prior to leaving him in the crate and at night… if he is exhausted he is less likely to whine and more likely to sleep!

    [Reply]

  27. Misha says:

    I have an 8 yr old female golden mix. She pees when she is out of her crate at night (even though I pick up the water, never let her drink or eat too late, and always let her out several times right before bed).

    Sometimes she is fine in her crate, other times she goes through phases where she will be quiet for the first 5 or 6 hours and then anywhere from 5 – 7 am she will start clawing at the gate, panting like crazy, shaking, rattling the crate and making so much frantic movement noise that we can hear her upstairs in our bedroom over the sound of our sleep music with our door shut and the kitchen and living room door shut! She rarely whines but she just claws and shakes the crate (she’s medium sized and only weighs like 30#!) and it sounds like someone is beating down our door!!!! I’m exhausted and pissed and my hubby is REALLY pissed and angry when she does this because he can’t go back to sleep and he already finds this particular dog annoying 🙁

    I’ve TRIED giving her several doses of Rescue Remedy…tried putting on music… tried putting something of mine in the crate with her…tried keeping the window open so she stays cool…tried EVERYTHING!

    HELP!!

    [Reply]

  28. Priscilla says:

    As a neighbor of some who is crate training their pup, I DO NOT recommend the cry it out method. My entire family of 5 is exhausted from listening to our neighbors puppy cry all night long. We have issued a noise complaint.

    I have 2 dogs, and believe in squirt gun and minor earthquake method.

    If you live in a condo/townhouse/high density neighbourhood, have some consideration for your neighbours!

    [Reply]

    Aftyn Reply:

    Minor earthquake? No.

    [Reply]

  29. Kayla says:

    I have a 10 week old frenchie/pug puppy and he is doing really great, I am crate training him right now and he is really good at night he sleeps in it beside the bed and doesn’t really cry at all but just whines when he has to go out for a pee/poop about twice a night right now. I will be going back to work soon and so I have started putting him in during the day for a couple hours at a time. I give him a toy and lock the door and walk away and then I wait outside the room and can hear him cry for about 5-10 minutes. It is really hard to do and usually by the time I go back and get him he is all relaxed and happy. Is this okay for him? will he get over that initial crying once hes a bit older and more comfortable? (I use music and a ticker as well)Please help, any advise is appreciated. I just want him to be potty trained and happy to go in his crate while we are at work until he is old enough to have free range of the house! Thank you

    [Reply]

  30. lxscutie says:

    My 9 month old pug was doing great at night. Loved his crate. The past 3 nights he has tried all night long. Followed the above last night and moved him to another room still tried. … help!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Give him lots of exercise before bed!

    [Reply]

  31. S23lmf says:

    We have a 10 week old doberman puppy, he is fantastic in the house and let’s us know if he needs to go out and we gave no complaints other than the crate training, we have tried alsorts to get him used to it but he cries all night, we have tried tending to him and telling him to be quiet. We have tried letting him out to do his business, we have bought scented plug ins to calm him, a pet corrector to let him know not to bark and we are now considering a thunder jacket which is supposed to help with anxiety, etc. we haven’t slept for 7 days solid and need help!

    We took time off work but we need this sorting before we are back at work, please help if you have any suggestions. Thanks

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    You simply need to keep him awake and give him lots of exercise an hour or so before bed and make sure he isn’t sleeping before that.

    If he is tired he will sleep!

    I put the crate next to the bed so I can hear my puppies and they can hear me

    [Reply]

  32. DanielleS says:

    I have a similar problem as an earlier post stated with separation anxiety. My puppy is 4 months old and I got him from a pet store. He will go in his crate sometimes willingly, sometimes I put him in there and he’s fine and chews on a toy or sleeps. But as soon as I leave the room he freaks out. Pees and poops and runs back and forth in it, sometimes causing bleeding on the pads of his feet. How can I break him out of this? When I take him out and he relieves himself I always reward him, but he still occasionally goes in the house. My main concern however is leaving him in the crate. I don’t want this to make things worse for him, but I can’t be at home 24/7. How can I help him be away from me?

    [Reply]

  33. Elaine basalo says:

    I can not believe that you lot leave your dogs in a “crate”? If you do not have the time and patience to have a pet, then DON’T! How would you like being caged up for up to 10 hours a day? Ridiculous! Here in Australia we have backyards for animals to roam and then exercise them outside of home. I never knew that these things existed until I googled for kennels (not cages) and realised why so many dogs and cats are handed back for adoption. People who purchase puppies and kittens just for their own pleasure until they realise you need to invest quality time with your new family member. So grow up and own it!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Crates are a wonderful tool that save many dogs from euthanasia!

    [Reply]

  34. Cheyenne says:

    I have a 9 week old aussie and she will not sleep through the night. We have her in a crate and will only quit whining and howling if we lay next to her crate. It’s been four nights of this. We live in an apartment and can’t have her howling all night. Any suggestions?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Like babies cry, puppies howl at first.

    I always put the crate next to my bed and play music so that the pup can be soothed and I can hear when the pup rustles so I can get them outside.

    Most 9 week old puppies have to go out a few times in the middle of the night.

    [Reply]

  35. Minette says:

    by putting your hand on her crate to soothe her when she cries you are rewarding her crying.

    Read this for more information http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/top-5-reasons-dog-crate-train/

    [Reply]

  36. Tawny A. says:

    It took a yr before he finally got the hang of the crate but now he does fine in the thing all night. The problem I have is as soon as I get up he starts right in crying till I get done getting dressed to take him out its a whine like to the point of such a high pitch I get a headache before I get a chance to get him out to potty I have braces I have to get on before I can do anything. He watches me every morning he knows he’s going out but insist on crying like I’m not moving fast enough for him. He won’t use the pity potty any more which is good but what do you suggest I do I can only get dressed so fast and where I live I have to be dressed b4 going out NO PJ’s allowed so I’m stuck. LOL

    [Reply]

  37. Amy says:

    I have a five month old puppy whom every morning at 130am and 330am crys at 130 he crys for a good half our or more till he goes back to sleep at 3-330am he crys I tell him shh no but he won’t stop. I open the door he continues to cry and bark but doesn’t come out of his crate. It so annoying finally after getting pissed and grabbing him out he will go out and do his business go then I put him back in he will continue to cry and bark for another good half hour before going back to sleep. Then my husband get up for work at 430am takes him out to eat breakfast. Let’s him out again he goes in his crate and then sleeps till 1030 with out a sound. The dog sitter comes at 11am to let him out and plays and exercise with him for 45minutes. Then he goes back in crate to sleep till we get home at 4pm. He eats and we play outside and walk him till 730pm… He goes to bed then just fine with out a peep till it starts all over at 130am again.

    Please help I cannot continue to have interrupted sleep every 130am and 330am every day.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Then you need to invest more time training and exercising prior to bedtime.

    You are expecting a baby to sleep from 730pm to 430am… 9 hours can be a long time especially if you have slept most of the day.

    Play ball take him for a run, swim him every night for 30 minutes or more. If he is exhausted he will probably sleep longer.

    However, I have a female that needs to pee every morning around 430 so I just get up with her and go back to bed.

    Sometimes we have to make sacrifices for those we love, being up later, getting up earlier, having our sleep disturbed etc.

    [Reply]

    Amy Reply:

    We are outside playing and exercising from 430pm till 730pm … Only breaking for dinner. He is tired he lays down on his walks and doesn’t want to walk any more. he gets lots of exercise. I do get up and take him out at 330am then he goes back to bed it’s the130am crying for a half hour plus … I also take him out at 10pm to out before he goes in his crate. I guess I will figure it out cuz I cannot get so little sleep!

    [Reply]

  38. Debbie says:

    I have a 3 month old puppy. he was doing fine in his crate till about 2 days ago when he started barking and whining again. this can last for hours. Nothing has changed. any suggestons

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Make sure he is too tired to bark or whine for long and then you can let him out when he is quiet. ANd, make sure to work on it while you are at home, not just at night or when you are away.

    [Reply]

  39. Tanith says:

    We have a 2 1/2 year old terrier mix who is crate trained. She is happy to run to her crate when we leave the house. We simply say “kennel” and off she goes. She is often already in and waiting even if we haven’t said the word. She knows our routines. 🙂 The only problem we have with her is when the kids come home she goes BANANAS with the barking and whining. When I come home on and off during the day she is completely quiet for varying amounts of time until I let her out. When the kids and I return from school….she goes crackers. We have tried covering her crate, making her stay in until quiet, and telling her to “hush”. Any ideas?? Thanks so much!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Try sneaking in and exercising her prior to kids coming home so she is more tired.

    If not let her bark it out and only let her out when she is quiet… if you let her out when she is excited like that she learns to put herself in that state.

    However, it is pretty normal for dogs to get over excited when their kids come home. Also try and make the kids quiet and calm so they aren’t feeding off of one another.

    [Reply]

  40. peter says:

    Once the puppy is quiet what is a good amount of time before you let the puppy out, I let him whine himself quiet but how much quiet should I wait for, 30 seconds? A minute?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Probably only enough to be able to praise the pup, so only for a few seconds.

    It is also helpful to make sure you have a tired puppy, then you can put them in the crate for naps.

    [Reply]

  41. Tammy says:

    I have an 8 week old husky german shep mix! We have done all above! My two questions he doesn’t want to go in crate at first we put awesome treats and our clothes that have our scent! He refuses! However he will finally go in and cry for exactly 6 -10 minutes and stop! He sleeps all night no problems! Doesn’t soil his crate. How do we get him to want to go in and not cry every time for 6 minutes??

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    He is 8 weeks and in the scheme of things 6-10 minutes is nothing, let him be a baby and cry a little if you are positive about it and play with his crate he will learn.

    [Reply]

    Tammy Reply:

    Thanks for your reply! So, I have been trying to make it more fun. Play games. Put in treats, all has been fine until last two days. He is so calm when out. I put him in his crate! Fine at first then cries his 6-10 min.. Then stops. Well then He has been throwing tantrums! Tearing up his pillow and I fed him in his crate.. So he will see it as fun place he tore up his bowl in all out tantrum.. He was just fine playing and all .. I let him go in his room willingly he didn’t cry. everything was fine I go to bathroom come back and see this. he stated another tantrum and I read the advice of several people to just wait him out. Don’t go to him if u know all is well , I did that! He eventually stops but he is throwing tantrum every day! I never give in always wait until he is quiet then reward him. It is not stopping I am very confused how can he be so calm out of his room. Even initially in the room but the moment I leave all hell breaks loose!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Have you ever considered how fun it might be to shred a pillow if you are a dog?? or a bowl?

    Dogs often think things left in their kennel are things that are THEIRS to do what they want with… When I have young or immature dogs I put them in a kennel with nothing in it, unless I am feeding and I use a metal bowl.

    He might not be tantruming as much as he is entertaining himself or giving you a reason to look back in or come back into the room.

    Most dogs crate train after a few weeks of some tantrums and whining

  42. Amber says:

    I have a 15 week old German Shepard/Border Collie Mix. I’m trying to crate train him for his safety as well as I have 2 cats just over a year old who still aren’t a huge fan of the puppy. He has a pillow and his extra large stuffie that is a dog. He loves to sleep with his stuffie as he can cuddle up with it. I got him when he was 12 weeks old and his sister was still with him then. I couldn’t take both unfortunately. I took the first few days off of work to help him adjust and get used to the crate. So he’d go in the crate for naps/bedtime/when I had to run out quickly. And he screamed and whined and cried all the time for the first few days. He goes out for his nightly walk before bed and does his business gets tired. We’ve had 2 good solid weeks of no crying or anything. The past 2 days tho he’s gone back to screaming while in his crate. I’ve tried covering it that makes him panic more. I’ve tried special crate treats he loses interest as soon as the door closes. I’ve tried making the crate smaller. I’ve tried telling him firmly quiet. I’ve tried the loud noise pennies in a water bottle to startle him. If I tell him “kennel” he runs straight for it tail wagging I tell him good boy pet him give him his crate treat Theb shut the door and the whining begins . The crate is right beside my bed and he normally is only left alone for 3 hours 3 days a week. Besides that he comes everywhere with me. Should I start leaving him by himself ?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I see a lot of problems. The first being he goes everywhere with you. You aren’t fostering the ability to be alone if he is with you all of the time. He needs to learn to find enjoyment in his own time and space, whether that is outside more or in his crate.

    Also you need to TRAIN in the crate. If you only use it when you leave and at night then it is no wonder he panics. you must use it while you are home even if it is only for 15 minutes at a time. He shouldn’t feel like it will be 3 hours everytime… but you should also be able to leave longer if you desire at some point.

    Also use music to keep him occupied and to keep him from hearing everything that is going on around him.

    [Reply]

  43. Amanda says:

    Hello! We have a 13 week Golden Retriever who we got at 8 weeks and have been working with for over a month. She is able to sleep through the night with no problems and doesnt whine at night. The issue is when we leave the house. She doesn’t bark initially, but after 15-20 minutes she starts barking off and on for quite some time. Also, when she falls asleep elsewhere in the house we put her in her crate while we sit in the same room (living room)… she’ll bark for a few minutes and finally settle down. It seems that we are backsliding. Any ideas? We’ve done toys, kongs, you name it. We live in a townhome and already have complaints from a neighbor.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    make sure she is too exhausted to bark and make sure you are crating her even when you are home so she doesn’t associate the crate with you leaving.

    But a tired puppy is a good puppy. If you can’t get her so tired she won’t bark you may have to find a doggy day care until she grows out of it.

    [Reply]

  44. Autumn Fauver says:

    Help please! Our dane/pointer mix is a rescue we have been dealing with his anxiety and behavioral problems for a very long time and we are just wearing thin! This dog can be heard barking from two doors down and has a very high pitched whine! We are staying with family until we purchase our home and he is just so loud he gets away with his almost frantic howling screaching everyday. Now he wont even go in jis kennel at night without trying to pull the kennel door off and screach at us. He has actually pushed his wayout by bending the kennel door off before and breaking it. He used to atleast go to sleep at nigh just finr but he is trying his hardest to not stay in the kennel at night too. Im just at my whits end because we cant let him howl with children and family in the house and he just does not tire out of the barking clawing.We got a bark collar with remote and even then he pushes through all the zaps.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    What you are talking about is a remote trainer and yes, it is very difficult to use these effectively for barking. Citronella collars on the other hand are usually quite effective if you leave them on and make sure the batteries don’t die.

    however, that doesn’t deal with the problem. He needs to be tired. Imagine running a marathon or training for one and how tired you would be. Exercise will help him to sleep at night.

    And, I would consider a doggy day care during the day. I work for a friend at hers and we get a lot of dogs like this, who come to us during the day for playtime and go home exhausted. I would utilize a good one until your home is purchased and I would find a way to give him the exercise he needs on the days you don’t use it.

    [Reply]

  45. Kaitie says:

    so I have a puppy that is about six months now, we have been crate training her for about two and a half months that we have had her and she was totally fine after about two weeks. All of a sudden, her crate is the worst place in the world and she barks, screams, howls, whines and shakes the crap out of her crate stubbornly for hours when we put her to bed. Our Pom is also crate trained and he is totally fine it’s just out puppy who is right across from the Pom… We have tried ignoring her, tapping on her crate, moving her, giving her treats, making a surprising noise and nothing seems to stop her… It’s getting extremely frustrating because I work day shifts and she keeps me up from the moment I go to bed until the time I leave – I am getting literally NO SLEEP. I really need advice because otherwise.. Its just not going to work… HELP!!!!!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    exercise, exercise, exercise

    If you had just hiked 20 miles up a mountain would you be tired? It might take you a moment to relax and get ready for sleep, but you would be tired.

    Take your puppy for a run, a jog a game of retrieve or whatever will exhaust him about 30 minutes to an hour before bed.

    [Reply]

  46. Michelle says:

    I have an 11 month old Pit Bull. Got her from a lady that said she was crate trained and goes in crate on her own. When I put her in her crate she does nothing but WHINE and SCREAM at the top of her lungs. Have tried making her tired, have tried bones to chew on, have tried more play time but nothing is working.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    My guess is you are not working on it or training her when you are home. In order for it to work you must close her in while you are at home and work on keeping her quiet.

    Otherwise I would recommend a doggy day care so she is tired when you get home from working and she is not barking all day for the neighbors to hear.

    [Reply]

    michelle Reply:

    Actually she gets more attention than any human child would get. We are home 24-7 so she gets nothing but attention. We have even reduced the time we give to our other dog so that we can work with her more. We adopted her from someone else and they claimed she was completely trained, her actions may just be why they got rid of her. She is a good dog: just hates the crate and also hates doggie daycare: she gets sick there.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Spending time with her or giving her attention is not the same as training. Attention can sometimes be counter productive and cause some separation issues. Dogs need to learn to be independent. Read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/love-death-overbonding-bad-dangerous-dog/

    It takes a while to get used to day care, just like kids and school.

  47. My dog has been crated for 5 years she even goes in during the day to sleep there. Recently she cries at 4am to be let out. I always give her a crate treat and she umps right in she never did this before. What coukd have happened that made this change in her? I would so appreciate a reply its driving me crazy.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    She might have been sick at her tummy one morning and now it is a habit. You can try ignoring her if you know she isn’t sick or doesn’t need to go, but if you take that stand and she does then you risk having to clean up a mess.

    [Reply]

  48. Chellez says:

    I have a 3 month old blue merle pup named His…and his bark is a cross between a wounded bird and a rooster…now and when does he develop a normal bark?

    [Reply]

  49. Lisa Hadley says:

    I have a 2 year old Coton. He came to us crated on a plane at 14 weeks and has been terrified of crating ever since. He is house trained, very calm and gets lots of exercise so I have not crated since puppyhood. However, now when I travel he has to be sedated ad on a long flight if it wears off he freaks out and tries biting and ripping his way out. Mt sense is it is o phobia. Can I retrain him to be crated or us this cruel to pursue if he us phobic?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I think it is cruel not to crate him. Like you say, you can’t avoid crating… he will be crated at groomers and vets too.

    It is up to you to do the training it takes to get him used to it.

    Talk to your vet and get some meds to help you. And, then look up crate games and begin training for crating right away.

    [Reply]

  50. tabitha says:

    I have a 7-8 month old Chocolate Lab, Chessie. She has done fine in her crate. Maybe messed in it about 2 times total. She used to sleep through the night. but this year she wakes up at 3 am every morning and whines. i wake up at 5am and work over time at work. This is playing a huge tole on me. Stress and Anxiety included. I see the other replys that i need to just exercise her. But she was diagnosed with a having elbow displasia so exercise is really not an option. Swimming is but thats hard to do everyday. Vet told me no walks on the cement. i try to run her a few times on grass but they said to limit it. She will start to limp ( i give her glucosamine for dogs every day for her elbow) As a few others said im almost at the point of a shock collar. Not no so mcuh as a bark since i dont want to teach her not to bark. i just want her to learn when the right time to wine and bark are. 3 am is NOT the time. PLEASE. any advice would be a tremendous help.

    [Reply]

  51. Nekkesia says:

    I have a 4 month old pitbull & I got her when she was 8 weeks from the time I got her until now she absolutely hates being alone while in the crate. Her crates in the living room & during the day she’s somewhat a good pup while in her crate, she’ll cry & whine if I leave the living room. If I had to cook or wash dishes I have to set up mirrors in the house so she’ll be able to see me at all times, it’s crazy. At night it gets worse. I put the tv on so she has some background noise but she gets up every hour & screams & cries until I come out of my room & sit on the couch till she falls asleep. Then she’ll do it again the next hour. Another thing, I can’t figure out why she won’t poop outside? She waits till everyone is asleep to poop in her crate. I’ve tried taking her leash off & letting her wander & have privacy but she never does anything.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    You are setting yourself up for a very difficult life with this dog….

    I have never heard of anyone setting up mirrors so their dog can see them… you have it all wrong. You must teach the dog that she doesn’t need to see you. If fact, if anything, I cover my crates so that my dogs can’t see everything. I don’t want them to see me leave or come home or every move I make.

    I also play crate games so everytime they go into their crates they get treats and are rewarded. I throw balls and toys in there while the door is open so my puppies learn to play inside too.

    Everything needs to learn to self soothe, or they can’t live a normal and happy life.

    Also i hear nothing of intense exercise…. exercise makes puppies tired, and tired puppies sleep so I make my puppy exhausted them slip him into his crate. You can look up more articles by using the search bar at the top of the page.

    [Reply]

  52. Gillian says:

    I have a 6 1/2 month old fawn dobie puppy just got him today played w him all day and now he I s asleep in his crate not sure how to train him in it he whined and howled but after 5 min he fell asleep do I let him out later to pee and put him back in after till I wake up or do I keep him out of it not sure what to do please help advise me on this

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    He will need potty breaks but at 6 months he should be pretty good at being able to hold it.

    [Reply]

  53. Amanda says:

    Our two full size goldendoodles crate trained very easily, but our mini goldendoodle is a nightmare. We did everything you suggest and then some, and he will play in his crate and voluntarily lay in it with the door open during the day but if you close the door he won’t stop barking. We refuse to give in like you say, but it’s been 30 days of straight barking all night. Help!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    make him tired, exhausted dogs have trouble screaming

    [Reply]

  54. Susannah says:

    Put him back in his crate after his potty break, if you are still wanting to sleep. Puppies will need potty breaks throughout the night but they go back in the crate until you are ready to start your day.

    [Reply]

  55. Morgan says:

    Our puppy is doing his first noght of crate training and he has been barking, whining, howling, and crying for ober 2 hours. He is downstairs in our kitchen in his crate, but it seems like when we leave him, he soils whatever surface he is on. What do we do?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I put the crate next to my bed, so my puppies can hear me breathe and so I can hear them when I get up.

    Then I limit water a few hours before bedtime and I exercise them fairly hard about an hour before bed.

    [Reply]

  56. Pam says:

    My 7 1/2 month has done great in her crate & with potty training since shortly after I got her. All of a sudden, this week, she has started screaming for 1-2 hours, going potty in the house & doesn’t happily run in like before. Nothing has changed here in the house. She was spayed, but that was about a month ago.I don’t understand why she has regressed so much! Any suggestions?! I’m exhausted cause she now wakes me up almost 2 hours earlier than before.

    [Reply]

  57. Vicky mak says:

    I have just adopted a 9 month old cattle dog mix, neutered male. He is already house broken but I couldn’t put him in a crate. He was ok for the first couple of nights and then last night he threw a fit, I live in a condo and I don’t think my neighbors would appreciate a screaming dog, so I let him out and he is now sleeping in my bedroom. What should I do to make him feel safe again in the crate and not throw a fit?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    You have effectively taught him to throw a fit. Crate training doesn’t always have to happen at night…

    I make sure my dogs are exhausted but I also don’t let them out when they scream.

    [Reply]

  58. Caelin says:

    I just got a 7 week old blue heeler. He is actually pretty calm most of the time and I can see he’s really intelligent. I put him in the crate several times for short periods and he did okay, but last night I put his crate next to our bed and he screamed for so long. We live in an apartment with a roommate so I need to know the quickest way to keep him from doing this. Please help!!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Like babies, puppies cry when they don’t want to go to bed. There is no way to completely avoid it.

    Best things are to exercise an hour to two before bed and make the puppy very tired so he is more apt to sleep.

    Sometimes it just takes time.

    [Reply]

  59. Bernie says:

    I have a 6 week old pit bull I just got him this weekend every time when he’s done eating and I know he’s tired I put him next to his kennel and I wait till he goes in to go to sleep he has every time but at night I leave the door open of the kennel so he won’t cry because as soon as I close it he starts to cry I’ve tried leaving him in there and closing the door for 10min and 20min just so he can get used to being in there but he just cries im not sure if I’m doing this right or if I should wait till he stops crying even if it takes hours?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    6 weeks is way to young to be separate from mom! I would try and take the pup back for another 2 weeks or so, there is also a lot that mom teaches during these weeks that we humans simply cannot.

    [Reply]

  60. Bernie says:

    Will it be bad for my puppy if I return him then get him back when he’s 8weeks old ?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    No, it will be better because he will learn from mom

    [Reply]

  61. Jamie says:

    Hello,
    I have an almost 7 week mini dachshund. I’ve had her for 3 days now she seems very young and I can’t take her back to her mother there’s no way of getting ahold of her. I know they should be with their mother for 8 weeks before going to their new home. My Doxie cries anytime we put her down and at night in the box (she was only in there for 2 nights she had a kennel now) she literally howled and cried for 5 hours! She fell asleep then I fell asleep. 2 hours later my husband gets up for work and she hears him and starts howling and crying again. My neighbors are angry by now and I know I should of let her finish crying but I took her out. I felt so crushed for an hour because she did nothing but shake howl and cry in my arms. She was very shaken up and I couldn’t help but to feel worried. Like I shouldn’t of left her alone that long. I have two other dogs that were a breeze for crate training and I’ve never dealt with this before. Please help! Also I will get her a nuk and put peanut butter in it tonight to see if that helps. Also I have been playing puppy music for her. I found it on YouTube. It worked at first but hour later she’s up and howling not and crying in a screeching pitch.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Unfortunately this is what happens when we get a puppy that is too young to be away from mom. You will have to power through it

    [Reply]

  62. Gabriella says:

    I’ve had my 8 week old German shepherd puppy for a week now and his crying has only increased. We used to have his crate in our bedroom covered with a towel but his crying has gotten so bad that we’ve had to put his crate in the bathroom with the door closed in order to get a couple hours of sleep but he howls and screams so loudly for hours that we wake up. We wait for a moment for him to be quiet before we take him out but as soon as we do he runs around our room crying too. We walk him and play with him and train him in 15 min intervals throughout the day but he just never seems to be happy. We are at our wits end and don’t know what t o do, and we live in an apartment complex so we don’t want our neighbors to file a complaint. Any advice is much appreciated

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    German Shepherds tend to be a more vocal breed. With that being said he is also only 8 weeks old. Imagine taking a toddler away from mom and family. It isn’t an easy acclimation for all dogs.

    You need to play with and exercise him A LOT ah hour or so before bedtime. He should be exhausted so that he can learnt to sleep in his crate.

    I still think next to the bed is the easiest place because they can hear you breathe and it helps them to acclimate, but that decision is up to you.

    [Reply]

  63. Karen says:

    Hi
    I have a nine week old jackrussell pup he is adorable, until I put him in the crate at night then.he screems the place down.he screams for hours what can I do I play with him prior to bed to no avail.
    Thanks

    [Reply]

  64. Andrew says:

    I follow my 9 week old puppy around the house with a hoover. It’s not turned on, he just knows it could turn on. As soon as he goes into his crate, i stop chasing and back away slowly. He knows that his crate is a safe place away from VaCoom.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I don’t think this is a great idea to scare the puppy over anything. Puppies should learn not to be bothered by anything! Teaching them to be afraid and run and hide could backfire, especially if you are out and about and the crate is nowhere near.

    [Reply]

  65. Macky says:

    I know my question is slightly off the subject of crate training but since you had good advice as to crate training I thought you might be able to suggest something. My husband bought me a basset puppy for my birthday (I was going to get a dog but he decided to buy me a dog I’ve wanted for years but never had the guts to buy) and the one that fell in love with us (like literally followed us around everytime we were there out of 10 puppies and so I became attached) is the “problem” puppy, the one who had apparent anxiety issues and a fearful nature. The first night he was here was hell and it got better (he would somewhat tolerate his crate and his accidents in the house were reduced by half) but now things have gotten worse. I’ve been trying to crate train him outside but he screams and howls. He has a crate inside and a pen outside, for when I need the dogs out so I can clean without anyone underfoot. I recently started putting him in the pen outside and he will scream his head off the whole time. Now my biggest problem is he doesn’t want to go outside to use the bathroom because he believes he is going to go to the pen. I’m trying to correct this with treats and positive reinforcement but it’s extremely draining and aggravating.

    Ps. Apparently the breeder didn’t acclimate them to anything including a leash, other dogs or start potty training. And no she wasn’t a byb or puppy mill, just a incompetent breeder.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    As you potty train, I would suggest you pick your battles. I would use the indoor crate while you clean and after the pup is potty trained you can go back to the outdoor kennel if you choose.

    I have found that dogs like to be with us and some don’t acclimate well to an outdoor kennel.

    I tried this with a dog of mine when he was younger, he hated it too; and still hates being outside. I no longer require it of him and he is allowed to come back inside after he has gone potty. He only likes being outside if I am out with him. He is a pack animal and has no desire to be outside alone

    [Reply]

  66. Cynthia says:

    I have read through all the comments for someone to relate to and no luck.

    I have a 7 year old mini dachshund, she’s always been free to go potty through a doggie door and basically roam our home as she wishes. We bought and moved into a condo about a month ago and I gave into putting her in a crate at night and while we are at work. We have a 3 story condo and I did not want to have her going up and down the stairs unsupervised in the middle of the night. With dachshunds being prone to back problems, we try as much as possible to carry her from floor to floor otherwise she things she’s wonder woman and has already tumbled down by going too fast.

    She has been doing great this whole time which was a huge surprise to me being that she was always so free, up until about 5 nights ago. She has started whimpering, whining, and crying for long periods at a time. We try to ignore her thinking that she will get tired and fall asleep but sometimes it’s hard not to yell “Shut Up” while we are trying to sleep. She has always been in the spare room with the door closed at night, I really don’t want to give into having her in our room since she was doing so well in the beginning.

    The only thing that I can think of for this behavior is that I’m on vacation from work, I’m on my second week off and I’m wondering if she’s getting separation anxiety since I am spending more time with her during the day? Since this was my only idea as to a cause, I’ve tried taking her out in the morning as I would before and putting her back in as if I were going to work, she knows I’m still around and starts up again.
    I will attempt to only do treats at crate time, any other suggestions??

    Thanks!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    She needs more exercise prior to bed. Sleepy dogs don’t cry long.

    She also needs to be crated while you are home so that you can teach her correct principles.

    And, I think it is easier to crate train when the dog is in the room. For instance my guy had to go out in the middle of the night a few nights ago. I didn’t have to wait for him to scream, I could hear him pacing and panting and knew something was wrong. Being in the same room allows me to hear tiny sounds and when they are young tell them to be quiet and go back to sleep.

    [Reply]

  67. Manda says:

    Hi there!! Have a 13 week old husky pup, brought her home at 8 weeks she crate trained in 3 days. She’s great got her litter mate (male) 4 days ago. And he’s a screamer. Screams like he’s being beaten. I haven’t gave in I tried covering, he’s got blankets and something to chew on a treat when its bed time. Collar off hugs kisses puppy rubs. Night time stuff. When the suns up he’s good if he has to go in but at bed time forget it. Is there anything I should try? Is there any secret? I let him out after four hours of screaming but carry him out to pee and bring him in. (I’m in bed 6 hours)
    Exhausted 😴

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    He needs to be too tired to scream. Exercise, exercise, exercise

    [Reply]

  68. Diane says:

    We found a pup vet says it is about five weeks old. We are going to keep it. It will be our second night with her and she just cried. She likes to be with us. We have her sleeping in a kennel with toys a comfy dog bed and a scented shirt of my husbands. We can’t have her in our room as we have a three month old baby. Any suggestions how we can calm her and get her use to her kennel? She going to the bathroom outside once let out if the kennel and between plays with us outside the kennel. We have a chihuahua but she has free roam as she is trained- should i let the chihuahua sleep with the pup in her kennel or let the pup get use to being in it alone? As the pup just cries 🙁

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I would talk to your vet, other vets, or a shelter and find out if there are any mothers with puppies where this puppy could go for a few weeks.

    Young puppies like this often end up with severe behavior problems and aggression and I worry about your baby in the future. There are things that only a mother and siblings can teach.

    Read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/1-biggest-mistake-professional-dog-trainer/

    I would not force your chihuahua to sleep with this puppy it could cause more harm than good.

    [Reply]

  69. Iliana says:

    I have an 11 week old Siberian Husky I bought him at 6 weeks. He was quiet when I first brought him home but that’s cause I found out he was sick, so after he recovered that’s when his true self started to come out. I understand puppies cry so I just let him cry it out cause I know he doesn’t need to go to the bathroom cause I would take him out 3 minutes prior. I saw on a dog blog that it takes the puppy 2 weeks to a month for it to learn to be crate trained but it’s been a month and he’s still screaming and crying I put toys in there with him I even put a shirt of mine in there, I won’t come in the room when he’s crying I take him out to the bathroom quite often probably every 20 minutes to an hour I let him play for about 2 hours maybe even more to get him tired out before I go to bed. I tried putting his crate next to my bed and he’ll still cry i take him out to the bathroom he doesn’t do anything. I honestly don’t know what to do and I need someone’s opinion lol.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    This is just another reason I don’t believe in taking puppies this early they don’t have the coping skills or the social skills that they need. It just makes your job more than twice as difficult

    [Reply]

  70. Amber says:

    I have an 11 week old Pomeranian and she absolutely HATES her crate. I crate trained my boxer and she whined the first two weeks but then learned to love her crate. My pom is complete opposite of my boxer. We use the clicker/training treats and nothing has seemed to work with her. I come home from work or wake up in the middle of the night and her face with be completely wet with little bar marks on her snout from the crate.(I also cover her crate with a blanket so she does not see us wake up to go to the bathroom or see my coming home from work) Not to mention it sounds like she is getting murdered in there. My boyfriend and I have tried to do everything to make her crate an enjoyable experience and she is just not having it. Any bit of advice is appreciated!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Are you crating her when you are home to teach her? Are you playing games in there?

    Most people throw their energetic dog in a crate and leave or go to bed. This = a negative experience because it = you leaving and long times spent in a crate.

    Dogs must be crated while we are home so we can work on and reinforce behaviors.

    And, an exhausted puppy is much more likely to adjust and sleep in a crate

    [Reply]

  71. Krysta says:

    I have an almost 7 month old Cavalier King Charles Spaniel who starts shrieking in her kennel early every morning. She is fine in the evening when she first goes to bed around 9-10pm. It’s early in the morning, sometimes 4am or earlier she’ll start shrieking, and just doesn’t stop, she’ll go on for hours. We get up to let her out to pee, she RUNS to the door to be let out, and then we put her back in her kennel. She’ll usually be quiet for a few minutes but then starts shrieking again. How do we get her to stay quiet until the time we would normally get up in the morning? Should we be ignoring her all night even though she needs to go outside to pee?

    [Reply]

  72. Julio says:

    Hi, I have a 6 month old pitbull that i had gotten to stop biting my legs, but the past few days he began this bad habit again. I had gotten him to stop by giving him a toy to chew on whenever he tried to bite my legs, but this time around he just wants to keep gnawing at my legs and won’t listen. Any suggestions? Or should i continue using the toys?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    No, he needs real exercise and mental stimulation like training.

    he is interacting with you like he would a litter mate because he wants to play. Find a way to use obedience and play to make him more tired

    [Reply]

  73. Alain says:

    I have a 5 month old Labrador. We got her at 8 week’s and was crate trained really well. No whining or screaming. Now as of 4 days ago she is screaming and whining and scratching to get out multiply time in the night for nearly 2 houra. We have not giving into her and have waited for her to calm down to take her outside to potty, she then refuses to go back into kennel. Nothing has changed in the house with routine.
    We take her for regular walks everyday.

    [Reply]

  74. Vanessa says:

    My boyfriend and I recently rescued a 5 year old schnauzer/chihuahua/terrier mix. He’s already crate trained however he only makes it about 5-6 hours overnight in his crate before he starts to cry. We tap on the crate to try and get him to be quiet but ultimately he goes back to crying until we let him out in which he’s all amped up and full of energy and wants to jump in bed with us (which we are trying to train him not to do). Any advice for what to do at that 5-6 hour mark?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    this is just like having kids. Make sure you have an exhausted puppy and they will sleep later

    [Reply]

  75. Chantal says:

    Hello, I have a puppy that is just about 5 months old and we have had him in a crate since we got him at 9 weeks old. He absolutely hates his crate!! My fiancé and I leave work around 7:30 in the morning and we put him in his crate at that time. We bought a live camera and set it up so we can watch him on our phone. After a few hours, Rocky will start screaming and yelping and freaking out in his crate and he pees and continues to freak out. My fiancé comes home for lunch around 11:30 and leaves again around 12:30. Around 4pm or even earlier, Rocky does the same thing all over again and when I get home around 5:30 he already peed in his crate. I don’t know what to do anymore! He sleeps in our bed at night and holds it all night and hasn’t had any accidents. We tried putting him in the mud room during the day yesterday and bought a baby gate to block off the entryway and he ended up jumping over the baby gate and I have claw marks all over my walls from him trying to get out. Do you have any advice for me!?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Read this, start crate training while you are home and get him off of your bed at night… it is hurting his development and how he feels about his crate during the day http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/top-5-reasons-dog-crate-train/

    [Reply]

  76. Liz says:

    Hi! We got an 8 month old Catahoula mix puppy about three weeks ago. Prior to that she was at a foster home with another male dog. During the day, she hates being in the crate and has hurt herself gnawing at it and has escaped twice from it. I’ve tightened all the hooks in there now but she starts barking as soon as my wife or I leave to work. We even bought a diffuser to plug in and leave relaxation music playing in the background. The crate is in the living room in our apartment and we also have a male cat who usually sleeps all day. I usually go back to take her for a walk during my lunch so she’s usually in the crate about 5 hours or so in the morning, then another 4 hours after lunch. She loves the crate when we are home and will even eat her food in it and play with her toys in it. It seems that she might have separation anxiety when we are not there. We have a camera on her throughout the day and it usually takes her anywhere from 20 minutes up to 2 hours at times to get tired and fall asleep after we leave for work. She has no problem being in the crate at night and doesn’t even make a fuss throughout the night. We started off introducing her to the crate and giving her treats in there but the only issue is when we leave in the morning. Do you have any advice for us? Thanks Minette!!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    She needs to be tired. she sleeps all night and then you leave her in her crate… if you think about it it is not fair. You need to add a serious exercise regimen to her schedule in the morning so she is tired. Get up early for her

    [Reply]

  77. Liz says:

    Hello it’s Liz again from the previous post. We actually do get up early. We take her to the dog park around 6 am and she plays fetch and with other dogs for about 45-60 minutes. By the time we get in the car she just lies down. Once we get home we feed her and get ready for work. She goes into the crate for breakfast. I am the last to leave around 8:30. Before I leave, I lock her in the crate with some treats that she eats while I am still there. As soon as I am ready to leave I do not acknowledge her or say goodbye. I simply walk out the door. The barking and biting of the crate only start once I exit and lock the door. We do play games with her in the crate when we are home and she has no issues with it. Should she have more than an hours worth of playtime? Any useful advice you think would be beneficial? Thanks.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Some dogs do need more exercise. I know an hour won’t do it for mine. I used to run 13 miles and that wasn’t enough. I would have to use exercise and training to wear mine out. I also teach mine to pull a recumbent trike.

    If in doubt look into doggy day care

    [Reply]

  78. KE says:

    Hi. We have a 4 month old Cattle Dog mix puppy that we adopted around 9 weeks old. He is awesome and has been such a wonderful addition to our little family. He is still biting quite a bit, but we are working on it and not overly concerned about that at this point. Our main concern is that he is crying/whining/whimpering/howling/screaming at night still. We have had him in the crate every night for nearly 2 months. The first week was really rough – which we expected – and then he started getting a bit better, but always screamed for at least 15 minutes after going in his crate. For the first 6 weeks or so, we had predetermined potty breaks built in so that we never had to be responsive to his crying and now he can make it through the night. We try our best to make sure he is tired out before bed – walks, playing fetch, running around, etc. – and always wait until he starts falling asleep before we put him in for the night. We cover his crate, play music, have lavender scent for calming in the room (which is about 6 feet from our bedroom – he was far worse when we tried the crate in our bedroom because he would wake up and howl anytime one of us moved to the point that he was throwing himself against the crate walls and trying to bite through the metal door and we didn’t feel he was safe), we give him a frozen Kong at night, and make his crate super comfy. When he was starting to do better, we let him move from just having his blankey and a towel in there to having a comfy bed. It helped for a few nights because he loved the bed. Over the past few nights, he has started crying longer and longer at bedtime. Last night, he cried for over an hour and then woke up about an hour later and cried again. When there was a lull in the crying, I ran in to take him out to pee in case that was the problem. He cried for another 30 mins+ when I put him back in his crate and then destroyed his bed completely. He has never gone potty in his crate at night so we are very lucky there, but the crying is heart-wrenching. We are sticking to it, but we are desperate for a way to make it better. We are both exhausted after 2 months of this. Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks!

    [Reply]

  79. Faith says:

    I just got a 8 week border collie, and I have tried everything. I put a shirt in her crate that smells like me, I put a clock beside it so it imitates a heart beat. I play games in her crate, and I feed her in her crate. I put music on, and have tried covering her crate and then leaving it uncovered. But when I put her in so I can shower or use the washroom or even leave my house she howls, and high pitch squeals, and whines for the ENTIRE time. You can hear her outside of our house it is that bad. I even bring her outside and run her tired and then put her in but that does not phase her. I am running out of options.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    at some point you have to realize you have a baby. At 8 weeks sometimes puppies cry. You have to let her cry it out

    [Reply]

  80. Brittany says:

    Hi!
    I have an 8 wk old boxer who absolutely hates his crate. He literally squeals with panic along with the regular whining and barking. He also poops in the crate (I am assuming from stress) even if he had just went outside. Every single time that we have arrived home, there has been poop from one end of the crate to the other, all over the carpet and even the top of the crate that he can’t even reach… we have no idea what he is doing in there. We only picked him up last week and as of yet we have only been gone 2 hrs at a time at max. With my bf’s shift work and me being Mon-Fri there will be a few days every couple of weeks that he will have to be in the kennel from morning to evening with the exception of 2 visits from our pet sitter… and of course I am extremely stressed and worried about this. To date, I have tried the kong with PB, his favorite toys, leaving the door open all day so he can come and go, feeding him only in his crate, putting him in there for periods in the day… giving him a treat every time he goes in on his own, on command and when he is quiet in there, making the crate smaller, throwing blankets over top, even so much as playing anti anxiety music for dogs while he is in there to calm him down. Nothing works. We also have 2 year old boxer that the puppy plays with constantly and when I bring him outside for potty breaks, I run around with him making him chase me. We originally had the crate in a different room but moved it to ours but he acts the same. As long as the door is open he is perfectly fine but the second it’s closed he loses his mind. We left one day and could hear him outside the house… when we arrived home nearly 2 hrs later we could STILL hear him outside the house. I am to the point where I can not think of anything else to try and we are actually considering dropping crate training as we have tenants living in our basement apartment who are obviously very unhappy, they say that he does not stop for a second the entire time we are gone.

    Please help!!

    [Reply]

  81. William Peoples says:

    Hi we just recently got a 6 month minature poodle, and he hates to go in his cage at morning, and at bed time. He cries/whines for 2-3 hours. He also rips his puppy pads while he’s in the crate over night while crying at the same time. He always likes to just lay in bed with with me too, and never wants to go in his crate.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    It is your job to stick to crate training.

    A baby or child would probably want to sleep with you too, but somehow we understand the need for children to have their own space and be independent.

    your allowing the puppy in the bed will only make crate training worse.

    and the fact is he will spend a lifetime with times in crates. how will a groomer groom him if he isn’t put in a crate?

    It is kindest if you teach him about crate training.

    [Reply]

  82. Lauren says:

    I’ve read through some comments and I couldn’t find an answer to my problem..
    I have a 4 month old Great Dane/lab puppy that I just adopted.
    He has severe separation anxiety from me, which I have dealt with before, but not to this extent.
    We’ve also been trying to work on kennel training but to no avail.

    He will literally grab onto the bars of the kennel with his teeth and bite down and just scream and scream. I have found blood on the floor just now, and his gums look bruised.. I’m not sure how often he has done this while I’ve been at work.
    Is there any solution to this problem?

    (I will also be taking him to the vet to make sure his teeth and gums are okay.)

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I would invest in one of the crates shown in this article.

    I too have had to get one and I will tell you that a $700 crate is cheaper than repairing adult teeth or having your home and walls eaten.

    Also read the article http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/create-deal-separation-anxiety/

    [Reply]

  83. Hana says:

    Hi, my husband and I got our second puppy, a great dane that is 7 weeks old (the vet said they were good to go to their new home) and he constantly whines. If I even put him in the crate for a second to use the restroom he screams. I have tried everything from ignoring him to squirting him with a water bottle when he whines. My other pitbull was so much easier to crate train and is an angel even at 7 months old. During the night my dane will whine and scream as well. We play with him a lot even when all he wants to do is sleep all day and we live with other people and I don’t want it to bother them and they say he just continuously whines. Please help!

    [Reply]

  84. Marisa says:

    My puppy was crate trained, my schedule has recently changed so now she’s throwing tantrums in her crate during the day. Like she literally moves the crate a few feet from where it usually is. She also is refusing to sleep in it at night now. She won’t go in it before midnight and she starts crying at 3:30am. The crate is downstairs. Should I move it upstairs to my bedroom?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    exercise that puppy!!!!! And, yes, I find they bark less if they are in the room and you can both hear each other

    [Reply]

  85. Melissa says:

    I live in an apartment with my 13 week old Golden Retriever X. Having a large breed dog in an apartment has never been an issue (I used to have a 65lb Australian Shep X), as I set aside plenty of time for exercise for my pup.
    Crate training was going well, up until last week. What changed? I was finally able to take her out for walks, as prior to this my vet suggested waiting until she had her second set of shots before venturing outdoors. Now I can’t even make a 30 minute run to the store without coming home to a puppy meltdown. I can honestly hear her from down the street.
    I don’t know what to do. It seems she has figured out that while I get to go outside (which she loves doing), she’s stuck in the crate. Leaving toys with her, stuffed Kongs, exercise, music on… nothing works. I end up coming home to a barking, drool soaked puppy (and crate), and I’m worried that I’m going to receive noise complaints.
    I’ve never used the crate as punishment, and when I do come home, I wait for her to stop making noise before going into the room and letting her out of the crate (as I don’t want to reward “bad behaviour”). Yet somehow I’m still in this mess.
    Any suggestions? I feel like I’m being held hostage by my puppy!

    [Reply]

  86. Eva says:

    Adopted a 2 year old Manchester Terrier (possibly mixed with Rat Terrier because of white patch on chest) 1 month ago from local shelter.
    From the day we brought her home, she has slept in a large crate that could fit a Rottweiler (should it be a smaller crate?).
    Every night, she whines, first high pitched and infrequent, then a honking whine, and finally a yipping, yapping, howling high shrill whine that could wake the dead. She then proceeds to make a frustrated whining sound while tearing up the newspaper in the crate (we tried without newspaper, but she chewed up the plastic liner instead). We can’t put anything on top of the crate, or she will pull it down and tear it to shreds.Shoes, sheets, leashes, even a pair of my husband’s work pants that he put on top of the crate as he was folding laundry.
    She has also bitten through every leash we have tried to put on her, even with a harness, and even if the leash is on her in the car. If she’s being walked, you can’t turn your back because she will be biting the leash. She can’t be tied up on a lead because she whines like she’s being killed.
    If we come out of our bedroom to tell her to be quiet, she immediately stops whining and sits in her dog bed. I have tried letting her sleep on the futon at night but she whines just the same, even if she falls asleep on the couch with us and then we go to bed. Whenever she is left alone in a room, even if the door is open and she can see us, she whines. Whenever a human is not paying attention to her, she whines the honking whine. We do not reward this behavior. We ignore her and only pay attention to her if she is quiet and sitting (which she does on her own). She is in the crate 4 hours max per day and at night we are lucky if we get 4 hours of sleep. I made the mistake of letting the dog out of her crate, taking her out to pee, and then shutting her inside so I could check the mail without her chewing through her leash. I came back inside after 5 minutes to find the trimboard of all 3 doors and some cabinets badly scratched. At least 3 times/week, we take the dog to the park, she hikes, she runs outside every day, but she still whines at night. She has kong toys and rope toys and everything, but still whines. The only time she is content is sitting on the futon being cuddled, and even then, she nervously bites her feet Bitter spray does not work on her, she still licks and bites. This dog needs a LOT of attention, and it was very difficult even treat training her to sit. I will not let this dog on our bed, because anytime my husband lets her on the bed to cease the whining, she seems to think the bedroom is part of “outside” and therefore pooping grounds.Tried everything I can think of, including banning her from the bedroom and putting her food dish on top of the place where I just cleaned up her poop. The crate will not fit in our tiny bedroom. I know that she just wants to be near us and fears being left alone, but I CANNOT and WILL NOT 1) Spend all day at home with the dog 2) Take the dog everywhere with me. She needs to learn, and she is being trained with firm, consistent commands. She is just confused and/or stubborn in my opinion.

    [Reply]

  87. Emily says:

    I got a Siberian Husky puppy a week ago when he was 14 weeks. Ever since we brought him home he howls and screams if he can’t see me. It doesn’t matter if he’s in the same room with my parents, if he can’t see me he throws a complete fit. We have to keep his crate in the garage because he’s so loud. He has also figured out how to push the tray out of the bottom of his crate so he can get his feet on the ground and move his cage around and get out. We had to put car batteries in front of his cage so he couldn’t push the tray out and escape. How can I stop him from being so attached to me?

    [Reply]

  88. E. Mack says:

    We have a 1 year old Black Lab/Blue Heeler who carried on the first week in his crate while we worked. He is in for 4 hours in the morning and 3 in the afternoon, I go home at lunch and let him out. We adopted a 14 week old Black Lab/ Boxer mix last week and her crate training is going nothing like his. She is a screamer. She screams in the car, if he goes outside without her, if she can find us in the house, etc. She cries in the crate for about 5 minutes (after a nice long walk) and then sleeps for two hours and begins to howl. Again the cycle repeats, howl for 5 minutes, sleeps a half hour or so, howl again. She is house broken and can go all night without a pee. I have her in her own crate beside the older dog. Should I move her or him to another room in the house? When I let him out, I can tell he is extremely frustrated with her for barking. Advice needed ASAP before Moose loses his mind lol!

    [Reply]

  89. Kimberly says:

    I rescued an adorable hound mix about 5 weeks ago. He is 1.5 years old and we are working our way through getting used to each other and setting routines. He was on crate rest for heart worms when I got him and has since been cleared to be off of it for 2 weeks now. So we have done longer walks and a lot more play time outside. Since I got him, I had never heard a peep out of him but about 4 days ago, he started whining and barking when I leave for work and apparently it lasts quite a bit. The past two nights when I have gotten home, he has torn up his crate pad. I live in a condo and my neighbor is starting to complain that he “cannot get a moment of peace anymore” since I got my dog (yes, yes, a bit melodramatic but I get serious anxiety when someone is upset with me). I take him on long walks and when it is nice out, I let him stay outside for an hour or so just to be off of his leash. Last night it was raining and so I played with my dog for a good hour indoors (received another complaint that the playing to too loud) but still came home to a torn up crate pad. We don’t start obedience classes for another week and I am getting really stressed over this situation. I don’t want my dog to be upset either so I basically can’t make anyone happy right now and I need some advice.

    [Reply]

  90. Charlotte Jones says:

    Hi.

    I have a 9 week old cockapoo and he is fine going to bed in his crate we make sure he is really tired take him to his crate and give him a couple of stroke and shit the door. But he whines every morning at about 5:30. I tried taking him for a wee at about 4 every day for a week but it didn’t stop him howling. He either howled when I put him back in or howled at that time in expectation. I need help in training him to be quiet in the morning after being let out for a toilet break and not whining before it is time to get up.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Try getting up earlier and exercising him.

    [Reply]

  91. A. Vicky says:

    Hi,

    I have a 10 month old German Wire-haired Pointer who was adopted from a rescue about a month ago. I recently moved back to University into a dog friendly house (about a week and a half ago) and have been really struggling with my dog since then. I tried leaving him alone in the house once which turned out to be a disaster, I returned not 10 minutes later to shredded tissues and cardboard boxes. I decided to buy a crate. It’s double doored and large enough that he can get up and move a bit and turn around. The problem is that he’s managed to get out twice, once last week and once today which was almost fatal – he destroyed a lot of things in my room and managed to get into a bottle of prescription pills. Luckily I came home and noticed this quickly and took him to the emergency hospital and now he is fine. My problem is that I’m a working student with a huge love of dogs. I got him originally to help with my suffering of depression as well as to save a life. I’ve worked as a vet tech for 7 years and have 3 dogs back at home with my parents so I felt like I had enough experience to manage a rescue but am now a bit worried. The dog is fine when I’m home, sleeps a bunch, plays with some toys quietly and never destroys anything he’s not supposed to. He’s managed to learn some basic tricks quickly too which seems promising and he’s also very food motivated. I take him on long walks every morning and put one of those mental stimulation toys stuffed with kibble in the cage and hope both of these combined are enough to keep him distracted. I haven’t yet left him in the crate for more than 3 and a half hours but he manages to bark the full time (barking when I leave and still going when I return). Additionally, I video-taped him today to see how he was getting out of the crate and it looks like he’s using a combination of his teeth and throwing his body against the cage to loosen the handle and push free. I am planning on getting padlocks to lock both doors of the cage but I am a bit worried that I will come home one day and find him hurt and/or bleeding from how intensely he’s using his teeth on the metal. I really appreciate all the advice offered in this article but I was hoping for some advice on how to more quickly prevent the dog from harming himself. As of now, I’m planning on feeding him in the crate so he understands it’s not such a terrible thing and working on randomizing a routine (i.e. not picking up my backpack then keys then shoes every afternoon in the same order) so he never has the chance to figure out my routine and start freaking out beforehand. I do have to work, but I really don’t want to come home to a hurt dog and I am trying to avoid medication if possible since he has one of the sweetest, bubbly personalities ever. Thanks!

    [Reply]

  92. Jackie W. says:

    We have a 4 month old female pug. We’ve had her for 2 months and she has slept in her crate every night without a problem since the first night we brought her home. Now out of the blue she whines, howls, barks, screams, yips and basically freaks out after she’s done w/her Kong treat. She is even jumping up against the door and side walls of the crate. Nothing has happened in the crate. When she sees me get her Kong Candy she runs into the crate and waits for it so I don’t think she has a fear of it. She is not yet spayed and nothing has changed around the home other than we installed a doggie door a week ago. Is this age related? Any ideas on why all of a sudden she can’t sleep in the crate at night? It’s large enough. Thanks

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    My guess is the doggy door has equaled more freedom and I would also guess that you don’t work on crate training during the day when you are home?

    You must teach them that they can be crated while you are home and doing things in order for them to accept their crate.

    Also making her tired will help her sleep.

    [Reply]

  93. Richelle Longo says:

    Rescued a 2 year old beagle 6 months ago. Crate training went well up until now. He got sick the other night and yelped and cried.I immediately got up to let him outside. He was having uti symptoms so it was a long uncomfortable night for both of us going out frequently, discomfort, and sleeplessness. Well, you know where this is going. This worked so well for him that after 6 months of near perfect crating he has taken to screaming and yelping after about an hour or so after bed time. I have gotten up since we are still battling the uti issue but when he doesn’t settle down after going out I have had to remove his crate to the garage just to get some sleep. I know I did this but any help would be appreciated. We go to bed early as I get up at230 am to start an early shift. He had always been let out of his crate at that time to hang out with me as I get ready.

    [Reply]

  94. Ashleigh says:

    I have a 9 week old JRT. He has no issues going into to his crate for bedtime (usually 10/10:15) and has slept thru the night until 6/6:15. But sometimes he will wake up at 2am and need to go potty. Once I put him back in forget it…he will howl for over and hour then finally go back to sleep. I am also having a hard time with him being quiet when I let him out. He is very verbal and is so excited he whines, grunts ect…so much so that he will do it for 10min after being let out and after having gone to the potty. Please help!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Some dogs are more verbal. Look up my articles for teaching your dog quiet

    [Reply]

  95. Paul West says:

    I also have a almost seven week old pit bull. During the day his crate is open and he goes in and out, even goes in and lays down all by himself. But night time is a different story. He will sleep but only a hour at a time. Every hour he’s whining and yelping. We cannot sleep! We take him to the bathroom and he wants to play or lay on our laps. Put him back in the crate and an hour later he’s doing it all over again. Any suggestions?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    He’s seven weeks old. First he should be tired before putting him in his crate at night. Keep him from sleeping for several hours prior to bed and exercise him.

    Next, he is seven weeks. He is a baby. And, like a baby he has to learn to self soothe

    [Reply]

  96. Michele says:

    We have a two year old standard poodle with free roam of the house, who sleeps in bed with us, and just got a 8 week old standard.
    We have a crate in the bedroom and she will go in it for a nap when exhausted during the day. She will usuually cry for 5-10 minutes and then stop. Usually. We tried using the crate at night and she cried so hard and long she made herself sick …two nights in a row, all night and then we did the horrible thing….of giving in and taking her out of the crate. She is now sleeping in bed at night with us and our big boy spoo.
    She already holds potty to the mornings so we don’t need to crate her at night for potty reasons. She is happy in bed with us and generally sleeps, Her biting and chewing can drive us crazy where we need a break sometimes.
    Last night she either fell out of the bed or jumped off during the night and slept next to the side of the bed. There were no issues.
    Would it be bad to just let her sleep with us at night and use the crate here and there during the day? We have more stamina to deal with crying during the day. We want her to use the crate when needed but don’t necessilary need it overnight. Would this be a bad thing?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Yes, in my opinion it is. You are giving in to a “child” that is having a temper tantrum and you will see temper tantrums in other places plus a dog who is much more likely to throw a fit in the crate when she doesn’t want to be in there.

    [Reply]

  97. Dylan says:

    My puppy just turned six months old. He did just great being crated while I was away at work (or anywhere really) for pretty much the first four months I had him until this last week or two. I had to go out of town for a few days and left him with dog sitters. When I got back I made the mistake of letting him sleep in my bed for a few days. I have since stopped and begun to focus more on discipline and a little less affection, but damage has been done. He used to gladly follow his Kong into the crate and I could leave and come home (sometimes I have to be gone for eight hours at night for work) and he would be just fine. Now if I crate him and go outside for five minutes he goes nuts with barking, whining and most importantly drooling and foaming. He’s more than happy to sleep in his crate when I’m home, but the second I close the door it all starts. I work weekend nights and it’s all but impossible for me to find a sitter and I can’t afford daycare. How can I get him back to where he was a month ago?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Sometimes we have to accept that we made a mistake and wait it out.

    [Reply]

  98. Jennifer Clair says:

    Hello,
    We have a 17- week old shih tzu. He’s doing well with potty training, but at night he welps when he’s in his crate. He goes to his crate voluntarily and we play rigorously for about an hour before he goes in. He gets a special bone once in the crate that I don’t allow outside of it. I take him out to pee every 4 hours or so, so the welping is not generally associate with needing to go.
    Will the welping stop if I ignore it? We have his crate in another room because of allergies we would prefer to not have him sleep near us.
    If I sleep on the couch near the crate and shout “no!” when he welps, he seems to stop, but I don’t know if this is because I’m paying attention to him or because it genuinely works. I never let him out if he’s welping–he can come out for a potty break after having been quiet for a few moments.

    Should I try the noise maker approach? Or earthquake? I’m worried he will become afraid of his crate which would be a disaster for us.

    I should say also that he is crated during the day as well, but I’m home at lunch and he’s allowed free play once he urinates, so he’s out of the crate about half the time we are home in the mornings and evenings.

    [Reply]

  99. Brenna says:

    Hello – this article really helped me out when I was first crate training my year old Shiba Inu, Hiro.

    I have had him for over a month now. I quickly learned that while I was gone he would chew things. It’s only small things, but I am worried it could become worse (cords, something he could choke on)
    Crate training went wonderfully, at first. I work from home and only work away 3-4 times a week for 2-4 hours at a time, so I’m not gone long. He loved the crate and would stay in there quietly at night and during the day when I was gone. He would even go in there on his own to chill.
    However, one night out of the blue, he screamed for an hour straight. Before that he had barked and whined for maybe 5 minutes. Because of that I was really concerned something was wrong, but nothing was. I waited for a break in the barking and took him out – he didn’t need to potty. It was 12am by then. At 7 the next morning he started the relentless barking. He normally doesn’t even wake up till 8.
    Now, ever since then, he will gladly go in the crate when I put his kong in there and he is happy until I leave. My family says he has intervals of barking the whole 3-4 hours I’m gone. (They are unable to keep an eye on him during this time which is why I crate him) I leave the radio on, I put extra yummy treats in the kong, everything. When I get home, I wait for a break in the barking, then I go in and I don’t let him out until I get myself settled first, and he lays down and is quiet, even when I reach for the door. If he jumps up and starts pawing I will walk away.
    I have given up keeping him in the crate at night, because I’m concerned about our neighbors whose young kids need to be in bed early. (It’s a townhome) He has been good about not chewing at night though because I’m in the room with him.
    I’m really at a loss of what to do. I take him for 3 walks a day to get him exercise, but I can’t take him on a long walk before work. How do I get the crate to be a fun place again? Thanks in advance for any tips!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Perhaps you need to make a change and find a way to get up earlier and walk and give him adequate exercise before work (not just a stroll around for a mile or two).

    For instance put yourself in your dog’s shoes… being crated all night and crated all day is kind of unfair when you are not leaving him tired.

    Find a way to give him the exercise he needs.

    [Reply]

  100. T says:

    We had to move to an apartment about a year ago and my 11 year old lab now has to b in a crate when im not home… he also has seperation anxiety.. so when i get home he starts as.soon as he knows its me but my bf is here alone he dont whine … so how do i get him outta this we have neighbours and need a fix pls any suggestions.. tia

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    You may need to take him to doggy day care.

    [Reply]

  101. Alex says:

    I just got a 3month old pit bull. I went to the store to but a leash n colar cuz he didn’t have one. I brought him home and as I got out the car I put the collar on him n he started throwing a fit. I finally got it on him n I picked him up out the car n sat him on the ground n put his leash on. He screamed n would not move. I started calling him but he would not move. I even tugged on the leash n he did not move he just got louder. I picked him up n carried him up stairs and he got up n didn’t really do a lot if moving. I gave him a treat n he started warming up to my apt. He played with me n my son for a while. It got late so I put him in his crate. N he screamed. I took him out n when I put the leash on he screamed and pulled. I put him back in and he screamed for a hour and then stopped. This Is only day 1 how should I go about getting him leash n crate trained right?

    [Reply]

  102. Tammie Jones says:

    I have a new 8 week old Daschund puppy who has become very attached to me. I am trying to crate train him for when we are gone. I left him for a little less than 2 hours tonight and came home to find his face and ears completely wet. He had drooled or slobbered that much! I have read that some dogs cannot be crate trained due to trauma. What else can be done?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I’ve never seen a dog that “couldn’t be crate trained” I think that is an excuse.

    Sometimes you have to choose smaller time frames, play crate games and reward often. If you use the search bar at the top of the page you will find articles on all of those

    [Reply]

  103. Tammie Jones says:

    My question regarding trauma was something I had read. I’ve had 3 dogs and none of them wet their face salivating when left in the crate. I successfully crate trained my previous dog of the same breed. If I were making excuses I would not have asked this question. I find your comment incomplete and to be quite honest, offensive. For one who is supposed to be an expert, I would think you would have better word choices. And please tell me how it is possible to choose smaller time frames when one MUST go somewhere?
    The same thing happened today after leaving him for an hour and 1/2, the minimum time I HAD to be gone. I have put him in his crate on a daily basis for small periods of time. It appears is not the crate that is the issue as he will go in and out of the crate to play at times. It is being separated from me. He barks and carries on when he is in the crate and can see me in the other room. If I use a gate and step across, he immediately begins to whine. If my husband is holding him and I am in the room he wants to be put down in order to come to me. I am doing my best to raise a well-behaved dog. I did not do anything to have this occur, but I am looking for help to find ways to make it better. Your reply was absolutely NO help. I suppose if I were to buy your videos, It might be different? Well, no thank you.

    [Reply]

  104. Jeff Kahn says:

    I have an 8 week old Labradoodle. I’ve had her for 3 days and we’re cratig her. She always crys and whines and I always end up sitting next to her until she falls back asleep. Is that ok for me to do or is that letting her ‘win’?

    I live in a NYC apt so I can’t really let her cry for 4 hours or my neighbors would hate me. Any advice?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Doggy day care or dog walker

    [Reply]

  105. Jeff Kahn says:

    No this is for night time

    [Reply]

  106. Sandra Gilbert says:

    My mixed terrier that I got 2 months ago from the humane society is 5 years old and not house trained. I’ve never had a male before and never had to crate train. I’m getting frustrated trying to house train him. Any suggestions?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    We have many free articles on potty training, use the search bar at the top of the page to search for articles you are interested in.

    [Reply]

  107. Joanne says:

    I have recently accquired a 6 month old lurcher. I have always crated previous pets (all similar breeds) without an issue. In fact with most Greyhounds they prefer the crate to a normal bed as it becomes a safe place.

    However, this dog appears to become extremely anxious. We are having to use the crate as I am out of the house for 4 hours a day, 4 days a week.
    When we are in the house he is as good as gold, when we are out he has accidents and can have a tendency to chew, which we cannot have. I am determined to keep going, but could do with some more advice.

    Being familiar with crate training in the past, I have done all of the usual things. I introduced it in a fun way when I was in the house, I have fed him in there. I have shut him in and stayed in the room and then let out so he associates with safe time. When we are at home, we leave the door open and he very often will just use as a general bed, very happy to trot in and out.
    However the trouble does start when he cannot see us. I have tried to go out of the room and then leave for an hour and come back in the room, ignore him, just to reassure I am in, he stops momentarily then starts again.
    His behaviour is constant loud barking, following by bouts of clawing and chewing at the bars. He has bent 4 of the bars by chewing and biting and this is a very sturdy metal crate! I have left him for an hour at a time and the most he has been quiet was less than 5 minutes, then he starts again. He is attacking the bars and trying to get out. I need desperately to increase the time he can be left as my work is becoming affected. I always leave the radio on loud for him and give him a big bone AND kong. He will NOT touch them whilst we are not there, not even a sniff. As soon as we come back he immediately goes to the bone, but I have been taking it away.
    Today we tried again for 1 hour, he had been for an hour walk, lots of fast running and recall, he was shattered, however after being placed immediately on return to the house in the crate, the distress and barking began straight away.
    I would really value any other advice. I have read all of the previous comments and tried everything. Nothing seems to calm him down. I really need to crack this. I do have will power and I see the huge benefits to crate training from previous experience, however this dog appears to be different and more problematic! Please help.

    [Reply]

  108. Donna says:

    Hi iv had my bision frise 7 weeks she is 11 months old someone was giving her away basically not tiolet trained at all so crate was the way she s fine at night goes in easliy it’s in *kitchen* my other dog also has crate there well get up in morning she whining g I stand in fromt of crate for 2 ..3 mi s for her to quite she does because she really need tiolet I make her with I’d she tries to rush out and sits goes to tiolet 15 mins in garedn and I have to do school runs so back in crate .. well that’s where it starts whines insistently all day she never shuts up 4 hours later still whining have to listen to it get louder when I make my breakfast been told. All over net don’t let out untill quite! That would be good if she did .. have no idea not got any better in 6 weeks I’m thinking of selling it’s getting me down where I don’t even go in kitchen or wana open and close my doors cause she gets louder and louder .. iv ignored her never given in I’m too stubborn..

    [Reply]

  109. Donna says:

    Oh as per my post she has a hour walk and then a run on beach every day when she quiten down enough for me to stand and wait for hush.. but this takes her from 8.30 am till about 1pm so about 2 pm untill4 when I collect daughter and put in crate to dry of ..so 2 hours excersise but still whines to get out straight away .. to get out crate
    ..

    [Reply]

  110. Tiffany says:

    He was crate trained, we thought. And, was quiet all night. And, just recently, he started to whine, bark, and howl. I don’t know what happened.

    [Reply]

  111. M riddell says:

    My bichion frise barks all day when l leave him what can l do to stop it

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Make sure he is tired when you leave and crate while you are home too http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/top-5-reasons-dog-crate-train/

    [Reply]

  112. HInna Amjad says:

    i brought home an 8 week Morkie and let him have free reign of the house. I have been trying to teach him to use puppy pads while I am at work, but he doesnt seem to want to use them. He is now about 11 weeks old. He does go potty outside, but while I am at work he tends to go everywhere but his pee pad. I have been considering crating him while i am away.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Yes!! Crate train and don’t use potty pads

    [Reply]

  113. Jodi says:

    We brought a Morkie DOB 1-12-17 home. We have had him for a month now. You are brave foe letting him loose in the house. We can’t do that. We had success for about 3 weeks with a Iris panel playpen, but within the last 2 weeks he has pushed and moved it and now we are back to the crate with only hard toys. I’ve recorded him with my iPad he screeches and chews the crate bars during the day and will bark so much he vomits his breakfast. I have tried a frozen king with peanut butter and now on the weekend I’ve tried putting him in there while we are home. We haul it back upstairs for night bedtime with fluffy bedding and sleeps beside me in it for 8 hrs no prob. The day time separation is brutal on him. I do come home for lunch for mid day break. No potty in crate.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Exercise him until he is exhausted when you leave.

    He sleeps in there for 8 hours… but then you leave him all day… he needs more exercise and stimulation.

    [Reply]

  114. Mary says:

    Hi!
    I just adopted a spaniel/receiver mix puppy, about 11 weeks old. I’ve been crate training her for about a week, using a lot of these tips. It’s going okay, but I had a question about letting her out in the middle of the night.

    The routine seems to be I put her in her crate, she whines for 20-30 mins, settles down and sleeps until 3, wakes up and whines, I let her out to pee (when she is quiet) then immediately back in the crate until morning. This worked well until last night.

    Last night she went in her crate and was quiet (!) until 1:30 and then started crying, I let her out to potty when she quieted down, but she was also up at 3 and 5.

    My question is, even if I don’t let her out until she is quiet, and it’s only for potty, am I still reinforcing letting her out if she’s crying. I am very dedicated to not reinforcing this, but also want to make sure she is getting out if she can’t hold it.

    Thanks!!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I put my puppy’s crate next to my bed so that I can hear them get up and get a little restless. I try not to wait for the whine, so instead I am rewarding the behavior of getting up and moving around.

    I also try to make sure that my puppy is tired by exercising him an hour or so before I take him to bed.

    [Reply]

  115. Ken says:

    Hi
    I just got my 8week old lab today! He is attached to me. The first time I put him in the crate he screamed bloody marry. I wanted to cry. I kept him in for 5 minutes and did that about 4 times. I took him out to pee and ran him a little and he came in and I put him in and he went to sleep. I did that again after dinner and before bed. His crate is too big to go in my room so i have to keep in the den. Im wondering if I should just sleep in the den tonight because if he sees me leave he will cry. Idk what to do

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    At some point puppies need to self soothe just like babies need to learn to self soothe. I prefer a crate in my room, but it is up to you where you put the crate. Changing your sleeping routine is a big change that I would try to avoid if possible.

    [Reply]

  116. Joshua says:

    Hello,

    We have a 17 week d Bassett. She is now sleeping through the night in her crate! We are amping up the time.e for our work says but she still barks for an hour and a half during the day while we are gone. Is this normal for the training time ?

    [Reply]

  117. Megan says:

    We have two 10 week old Husky puppies. They are littermates and hate being separated. We have tried crating them separately and one will settle, the other will whinge and then vice versa making it impossible for us to sleep. Could we crate them together so they can calm each other?

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Then you will never be able to separate them. I suggest making them work this out and gain independence while they are young and it is not a habit.

    [Reply]

  118. Megan says:

    Thanks for the reply. We have managed to get them settled in separate crates for a few nights in a row. No whinging at all! I’m toileting them every 3-4 hours. They are up crying and screaming in the morning from about 5am. It’s not that they need to toilet – they just want to play. How can we stop this behaviour in the morning? Our neighbours will hate us if this happens every day

    [Reply]

  119. Cheryl DiLisio says:

    I have an almost 11mth old rescue puppy, we adopted her 7mths ago. She has been using a crate pretty much her entire life. The problem began about a week ago, she is refusing to go in and once we do get her in she whimpers until she ffalls asleep. Her crate is in our room and she used to just go in willingly (& is always given a treat). We don’t want to give in and let her win, not using a crate is not an option.

    [Reply]

  120. Cindy says:

    Got a puppy at 10 weeks old having hard time crate training feed her in kennel has good health chew bone in there leave tv on exercise before crating her she will eat then begin howling barking non stop and then she will poop all over crate even though she’s just gone outside crate is proper size for her she is now 4 months old every day this goes on night she sleeps in our room then ok just when I need to crate her during day for a hour never been more tha 2 hours never stops barking then poops

    [Reply]

  121. Missy Peckins says:

    Hello, we have an 8 year old puggle. He has been trained since the day we got him. In the last year we have let him sleep in our bed a handful of times- the last being about a month ago. Most nights he gets in his crate just fine but some nights he will get in and two hours later start whining. It’s 2:12 am and I’m typing this as he’s been whining since about midnight. We do not let him out when he does this. Any suggestions you could give us would be appreciated.

    [Reply]

  122. I have an 8 week old Cavapoo so sweet during the day but this is day 4 and he screeches wails and cries so loud the home association is complaining. I know I can’t give in but my anxiety from my neighbors is horrible. I’ve tried the doggie heartbeat pillow: pheromone spray warm blankets treat I’m at my wits end. I hope this is not an indication that he will be a loud barking dog. It’s going on a hour now and he is not letting up…. I just needed to vent thanks for this web site!

    [Reply]

  123. Aria says:

    I rescued a dog at 9 months. She’s a pit bull and lab mix. We started crate training the day we got her. She didn’t like it at first but eventually got used to it. She is now a year and a half and will not stop crying and chattering in her her crate. She has tried to escape and has broken the crate tray and bent the bars of her crate resulting in her breaking a fang and chipping her front teeth. She is also covered in drool when I let her out. I NEED HELP. I have tried pet relaxation treats to no avail. I just don’t want her to hurt herself further. I put a Kong with frozen peanut butter in her crate but she hates being alone without hearing and being around people. I’m losing so much sleep with her crying because I’m worried she’s going to get hurt.

    [Reply]

  124. Barbara says:

    I have a 4 1/2 month old Shepard/lab mix puppy. He was crate trained when we got him and has gotten much bigger in the last month we bought him a larger crate. He was doing great until tonight when I put him in his crate and said goodnight he started whining and crying. I came and let him out and I layed on the couch and he’s sound asleep on the floor by me. What changed for him to start crying? I can’t trust him alone yet. My husband won’t allow him in our bedroom even in his crate. Help please

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Well, by letting you out you have essentially told him that you want him to throw a fit in his crate. He should only come out if he is quiet. Search our sight for more articles on crate training

    [Reply]

  125. Danica says:

    Hi Joanne, I know this is an old post but I have come across it in a desperate search as our Greyhound is having the exact same problems. Did you have any resolution with this issue? Ours loves her crate and will voluntarily spend all her time in there. Except when we leave: today for instance, I saw on the video monitor that she screamed and cried for at least an hour (probably longer in fact, but I couldn’t check as I had to go to class). Did you have any luck dealing with your dog over time?

    [Reply]

  126. Marta says:

    I have an 8 week old chihuahua terrier and she just doesn’t like being alone. She won’t go in her crate even with treats n toys. I play with her for hours, she fights her sleep. But still won’t go in her crate. Once I do put her in there, she cries n howls so loud it hurts my ears. I’ve tried putting her in another room but still she cries n howls for serveral hours. It’s like nothing works that I’m doing please help

    [Reply]

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