1 Clever Trick For Calming Down Over Excited Dogs

Does your dog get WAY too excited and out of control when he sees something he wants in his environment?  Watch this video to discover a clever trick for how to finally start teaching your dog to calm down on command…

Then click here to learn even more:
http://thedogtrainingsecret.com/brain-games

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Comments

  1. Jonna Aldrich says:

    I am definitely buying

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  2. Ill try this out.ive got three that all want to go

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  3. Very interesting Video. Thank you for sending it for free. I hope to buy your advertized book soon. You seem to be down to earth and that makes me trust you and feel like I might learn something from you.

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  4. FRANCIS says:

    My dog chews on everything he think its a toy
    I would like to train him to sit on one command

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  5. Anne Borden, says:

    My normally well-trained and controlable standard poodle goes nuts in the car-attacking me as I get into the seat beside him and after I get him calmed down he whines and yips throughout the trip.
    He is a rescue and was 7-8 yrs old when I got him, about 5 years ago. Any suggestions?

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  6. Mary says:

    Need help with 1 yr old golden doodle that jumps & pees on people?

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  7. Bette Meng says:

    Perfect! This is just what I needed. Can’t wait to get home and try this. I believe this will be so easy. I have two dogs that get so excited when they need to go out that they won’t hardly let me get to the door. One dog is really good with commands and the other is just a little over a year old and rotten. I’ll let you know my results!!!!

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  8. Eleanor Agbayani says:

    I’m ready to give my German Shepard away.hes 1 years old and very strong.ive just had knee surgery and can’t handle him he keeps jumping on me and when I need to take him out for a walk he won’t let me put his lease on.plus he’s destroying my back yard. Need help

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  9. Katherine says:

    Great control without yelling jerking dog around etc!!! You have given so many training tips that ACTUALLY WORK!!! And they are all POSITIVE reinforcements that change a dogs thought pattern to do what WE as humans consider acceptable behaviors to live in our world…thank you very much for sharing and the training that so many PEOPLE need to help their dogs live in harmony with us!!! KUDOS!!

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  10. Sheri Galvez says:

    Thank you for this great technique. How do I get our pack from tearing the sofa apart, literally destroying it ? Sheri

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  11. DJ says:

    Great stuff. I have bought some of his videos before. When my aussie/collie/miniture sheltie started agility training at our local dog club, she was able to skip the first obedience class because she passed her first test with flying colors without taking home manners because of “thedogtrainingsecret”. She still had to take her public manners class but had a lot of that already learned too. She passed her CGC (canine good citizen) and is now certified by the national AKC. She can now branch out into therapy dog work, nose work competition, agility or rally competition, or whatever is best for us to train for and to do. Thanks.

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  12. tony says:

    the black dog didnt make hardly any eye contact but interesting to watch gave me insight

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  13. Elizabeth Fuller says:

    I was interested by the method of tempting your dogs by putting leads on them and then opening the door and , even when they waited patiently refusing to let them out . I am calm and patient but it made me agitated , frustrated and finally depressed . The nudging with the foot was also interesting . Please do not blame your dogs if they turn on you or merely turn away – you are really pushing them to the limit without any good reason . What a good thing they are good natured and , obviously understandably confused, but loyal and wanting to obey .

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  14. Suzy says:

    How to prevent rescued labrador dog from “jumping on vehicle door & scratching the paint” to greet any vehicle pulling into the driveway including my own.. With the high cost of vehicles, dog scratches on the outside door can become costly damage. It has gotten so bad that I must warn friends to call prior to pulling into driveway. With my being inside the vehicle, it has been difficult to even attempt any control to prevent such damage.

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  15. Kathleen Gee says:

    I think you need to take a closer look:
    1. The woman outside the picture was taking the leashes OFF, as proven by
    them running out without any other physical contact by his person.

    2. He didn’t kick the dog at all. He nudged him, just like you might gently
    nudge your dog if he is in the way.

    3. The black dog (I assume you mean the smaller one in the background)
    didn’t need to make eye contact. He was already calm.

    4. The dog was not confused. He was learning how to go out the door in an
    acceptable manner and that took some time to figure out. He had to have
    time to mentally process the information he was receiving fromChet.

    5. Chet was not “refusing” to let Sam out. He was giving him time to settle
    down on his own, which he did.

    My dog goes nuts at the door, too. This is a wonderful technique. Can’t wait to try it!!

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  16. Kathleen Gee says:

    Oops! My previous comment was for Elizabeth. It didn’t go in the right place.

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  17. Jackie Wilde says:

    My dog barks hysterically when it’s time to go out. I don’t open the door/gate until he is looking at me and “Quiet.” The minute I let him out, he starts barking hysterically (I swear, he can scream). I do the same thing at the 2 gates we need to get out of. Quiet and then scream – any suggestions? He is 27 mo. old Bernese Mtn. dog.

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    Minette Reply:

    I would utilize a leash or long line and when you let him out and he runs out and screams, quietly reel him in tell him quiet and bring him inside until he understands quiet in both places.

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  18. its ok, Kathleen, i think Elizabeth will still see it. well said btw! It was frustrating and hard to watch Elizabeth, i kept wanting to let him out cuz i thought he had held eye contact long enough , but then when he ‘did it’ I understood what he did, what Chet was waiting for Sam to realize and do. it’s fantastic! my question is : how do i apply this to five dogs running to the door?? LOL

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  19. Bob says:

    Both my dogs 3 and 5, healers, bark uncontrollably, at UPS or anyone at the door. I go to the gsrage, while they hammer the front door. Obviously we are a big step before this video

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  20. Dianne Pritchett says:

    My dog is 6 months old and needs to learn manners, SERIOUSLY!! I have a cat that is afraid of anything that moves. I have three other cats who reside in our bedroom suite with outdoor access. In order to keep the ‘fraidy cat’ calm, we keep the dog in a crate at night in our bedroom. Then when she whines to go out, we take her out. But this morning ‘fraidy cat’ went to the doggie door and when I brought out the dog, the dog chased the cat. She would not come back to me. Now I don’t know where ‘fraidy cat’ is. HELP!! I don’t punish the dog but how do I channel her excitement to obey me, not the instinct to follow the cat?

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  21. Patty says:

    Elizabeth, what Chet did with the dogs helps to teach them self control. They were waiting but would anticipate going out the door before he released them to do so. Having a leash on or an open door being an indicator to the dog that it is ok to go out is potentially dangerous for the dog. Ssuppose Chet put the leash on the dog and turned back to get something he had forgotten and a child opened the door. My dog does not go through any door including the car door until she is given my ok. This is really no different then putting your child’s coat and hat and making them wait until you put your coat and hat on and take their hand to walk them out the door. He also was not kicking the dogs just gently indicating to them that they were not permitted to go out yet. The dogs are more likely to respect Chet for what he is doing than turn on him.

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  22. Ali says:

    My do wines, barks and jumps when people come in. If she does. It know them she continues barking

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  23. Dyan says:

    So now i see a dog finally escaping and on its own.

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  24. Cherryl says:

    Walk time at our house is insane. I have three dogs and as soon as the shoes go on they are jumping at the door and carting in. I started this training and it has gotten better. My question is do I need to train it with each individual dog before putting them all together? Perhaps I would get better results or keep trying with all three. They seem to all get into a frenzy while sitting and waiting at the door.

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  25. Bette Meng says:

    Well said. I certainly agree with these comments.

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  26. Bette Meng says:

    Okay, I have tried this technique and it is great. Didn’t exactly get it down the first time, but with a little more practice, both dogs will be much calmer. This is actually an easy way to get a dogs attention and be in control. Thanks again Chet for a wonderful technique to teach manners to our dogs.

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  27. Paulette Melick says:

    Chet, I have Calm Dog and House Manners and I have watched them many times, but this video added another layer of understanding for me. Thank you for sharing it.

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  28. I wish I could comment in the present tense, but at the time I am dogless. My Samoyed…RIP… however, used to have this same problem. I would have liked to have had this video a few months ago. I am however, saving all the videos and emails Chet is sending out, so that when I get my new Sammie puppy, I will have the educational materials to train him right, from the beginning. Thank you Chet!

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  29. Dolores Alimi says:

    I have been fostering dogs for a 100% no kill dog rescue group in Randolph, NJ since the end of May of last year. So far I have placed 12 dogs into wonderful, loving homes where the majority of the people can’t believe how well behaved the dogs are. I crate train them during the day and when I get home they usually want to rush out of the crate before I can put a leash on them. I use this method of impulse control with letting them out of the crate to put their leash on and it works wonders. But, as is the case with a lot of things you teach dogs, you need to be patient. If you find yourself losing your patience then have your dog do something he knows well and when he does it , reward him and then you go calm yourself down before trying any more training. I have also been able to use this method when bringing my dog in after a walk. I have bad knees so I cannot afford for the dog to rush in ahead of me causing me to fall. My current foster dog actually sits outside and waits until I get into the house and say the word okay. Then she comes in and sits again on her own so I can take her leash off. Remember everyone, Chet’s methods are not immediate cures to problems. They are things you have to work on slowly and once the dog gets the hang of it, you will need to be consistent in what you train or else they will fall back into their old, unwanted routing.

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  30. David says:

    Thanks
    This technique works good too for when a dog is impatiently jumping up and down when you’re about to put on its leash to go for a walk. Or for when a dog barks as you’re bringing out its food. As soon as you see the unwanted behavior immediately stop and reverse your movement away towards the direction you were coming from.

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  31. Brenda says:

    Anne Boreden the difficulty is your Standard Poodles age, by 7-8 years the behaviour is set, but you can help to control it. Try false journeys so the second the behaviour starts, stop the car, and get out. So you will have to percifically plan the course you intend to drive.
    I think Standards are beautiful, and the second most intelligent dog in the dog world, top in Border Collie.

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  32. marcia french says:

    saw the video and enjoyed, however I do not have the same type of problem. He waits for me, always has with no training. He is where I am at all times unless I shut him out. He is a wonderful dog, except. can not stay calm… over excited when people come. has to jump on them, but never jumps on me. I feel I have tried everything you have told me, but strong pulls on the leash don’t work well either. My other problem is small running animals. (squirrels) He is very strong and I have to let go of the leash to save myself.(learned from experience)
    Right now I am going back to chapter one. But I hate to do it because he does love to go out and walk or play’

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  33. Angela says:

    My little Pom X starts barking the minute I put my lipstick on. I then have to go down a long staircase before I get to the front door where coat, boots, etc. Have to be put on. All the while Lola is barking and flying around like a maniac. How do I get her calm before I can even get ready to go out?

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  34. Belle Hays says:

    Amazing! I think I could succeed with my two dogs – both rescues and of unknown breeds, but my front door is up four steps and I am wheelchair bound, so am not a good candidate for your instructions. But I enjoy them all! anyway!

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  35. Tasha says:

    You asked for a question Chet, so here is mine. I have an 8 month old GoldenDoodle Lucy. She is smart, calm, responsive to “watch me”, and many commands and even when someone knocks on the door, she looks at me. I say Place and she trots off to her training mat and sits waiting until I open the door and let my guests or clients into the home. And then I am stumped! She will come when I call. Sit in front of the person, still calm… and then the madness begins. She literally works herself up into a frenzy. Squealing, jumping up on them and soft nibbling. I say Off and she will listen for a second and back off, making eye contact with me and then cant seem to control the behavior and jumps again. I put a toy in her mouth which helps with the mouthing but she can’t stop jumping. She loves people and all other dogs and repeats this hysterical behavior when outside and she sees other dogs. Other than these moments she is so calm and has great impulse control as evidenced by her waiting for her food quietly when I feed her. Its her loco love fest with people and other dogs that has me at my wits end not sure of what else to try. Yes, I have walked away when she is jumping outside…had people turn there backs and ignore her when she is jumping and have stood on her leash so she can’t jump. Nothing changes the level of excitement.. What am I missing?
    My hope was for Lucy to work as a therapy dog in my private practice but this level of high excitement would rule that out if I can figure out how to help her.

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  36. Lisa Everard says:

    I have 3 dogs, all of which are excitable – they wind each other up at door bell, jumping barking etc. Is there a way of training them all together as my time is limited and not sure if I have enough time to do them all seperately?
    many thanks
    Lisa

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  37. Gail says:

    My dog will wait quietly at the door because I have taught him not to barge through by quickly moving the door open and closed (and thereby catching his nose) until he sits and is calm. But he does not give me eye contact. Do I need to teach that in addition? He is 100 pounds of pure muscle.

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  38. Wendy Nydam says:

    I have the control at the door and can even leave it wide open with out them breaching the plane of the door, I have 2 Aussies and my problem is, when I release them they are so revved up, they burst out barking and the older one is above his threshold and grabs the younger one and occasionally it will cause an argument between them.

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  39. Tanya says:

    I have the hands off dog training program. My Winston is going through a defiant phrase and results in jumping/nipping/barking which part of the program should I concentrate on. I’ve currently started with redirection but would like additional advice.

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  40. I have a 3 year old chocolate lab who all of a sudden is afraid to walk on tile floor or a wood floor. Also if i let her outside with out a leash on she wont come back in but will cry n bark at the door but when you go to let her in she runs soni know put a short leash on her n she will go out and come inside with no problem. Has anyone ever had this problem with their dog?

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    Minette Reply:

    Slick floors can often hurt dog’s knees and back

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  41. Tomi Vensel says:

    LOL Jennifer, I know what you mean, I have 4! I am initially practicing one and a time, my plan is to then work with 2 at a time, varying the pair…then combination of 3…until the glorious day when this happens with 4. Honestly, training the other humans in the house to do this as well, is harder than training the dogs!

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  42. Wendy says:

    I have a Kelpie cross he is a lovely dog but he hates other dogs,
    When I take him for a walk and if I see another dog before him I walk the other way, but if he sees one even at a great distance he just goes mad pulling at his lead screaming so loud I’m sure people think I’m murdering him.
    I come home with blood running down my arms from the lead wrapping around them.I find myself not taking him for walks as it drives me crazy.Please Help.

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  43. Heidi says:

    I can’t wait to work on this with my dog. Clever is right! Thank you Chet! My question—–How can I incorporate this eye contact at the door trick and also have my dog let me go out first?

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  44. Linda H. says:

    My dog is really good but….when I take her out in public around other people and dogs, she just goes crazy and gets very difficult and impossible to control. As a result, I don’t take her anywhere. I’m afraid she’ll knock me down and I’ll break something. It’s also difficult to get a leash on her. Any suggestions would help. I purchased the impulse control vid but doesn’t really address the specific problems I have with her. She just turned 1 year old. She’s a shepherd/border collie mix.

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  45. Mike Burgio says:

    How do I train my dog to come when called?

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  46. Carrie says:

    My Yorki is one year old and tries (and sometimes succeeds) to get out the as
    soon as it is opened., runs across the street which scares me to death. My husband and I are in our middle seventies and it is difficult to chase and catch him. can you help? Is this video what I need to try? He won’t come when he is called……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Search our articles for help with teaching your dog to come when called.

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  47. Jessi says:

    Definitely going to follow your advice. The video is a very good helper. Good luck to all of us!!!

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  48. Thanks Chet – yes I’m using your method and it is working – my younger dog has picked it very quickly but his mum is a bit slower (or perhaps more independent!) but we’re certainly making progress – thanks again.
    Nigel

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  49. Mary Kay Falkner says:

    Please come and stay at my house. Not kidding. REALLY NEED YOU! Have 4 little dogs. 3 Yorkie’s and 1 very well mannered Shih-Tzu/Poodle mix. It’s insane here. I’m almost 70 years old and I don’t know what to do about it. Neither does my husband.

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  50. Chris says:

    My 2-1/2 year old Lhasa takes forever to look at me and when I do the open door/close door activity she looks at me-I open door a little and she looks at the door so I close it. We repeat this many times and she eventually backs off and goes and lies down nearby. This process takes about 10 minutes. I don’t get the impression she is “getting it” at all. Maybe I’m just impatient?

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    Minette Reply:

    search my articles using the search bar at the top of the page for one on eye contact and focus.

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  51. Lin Bauer says:

    I do very similar actions with my huskyxGSD but I have a treat in my hand, and she will not exit the door until I have given her treat, the door can be open with the other 3 dogs exiting but she will wait but it took my more like 2wks to get her to that level.

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  52. Joanne says:

    Elizabeth you need to read Kathleen Gee’s comments and watch the video again.

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  53. Marilyn says:

    I have a 10 month golden and have used this technique of getting eye contact before ….. Eating or opening the door or any other activity which has helped to focus this very active and crazy puppy

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  54. Helen Taliaferro says:

    I have been using the “watch me” command at front door and it has helped calm my barking dog down. I let the other two dogs out first and make Biscuit watch me and calm down before she goes out. She still runs like the wind after she gets off porch. We still have major issues inside with the barking with Biscuit. I may try the clicker.

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  55. Janet Igo says:

    I have used “Watch Me” or “Face” forever. I have also used the clicker method, which I have found on some dogs it works great but on others, not so much. The problem I am having at the moment is trying to train two dogs at once with no way to seperate them to give them one on one training. I really need to make this work due to my elderly mother in the home and they both need to obey all commands for Service!

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  56. Lily says:

    To Janet Igo: When you described your situation, it sounds so much like mine. My 90 year old mother lives in the house. In addition to the 6 month old male Golden and a 1 yr old female Lab, there are 3 small poodles (11-12 yrs old- 2 four pound; brother and sister, 1 male ten pound) Talk about needing help!! I keep screaming HELPPPPPPPP!!!!

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  57. DEbbie says:

    I’m wondering how to take the lead of my pug puppy so she doesn’t run away from us.x

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  58. Dawn Snyder says:

    I’m working with my dog and she’s working very well with what you have said. Thank you.

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  59. GRACE BUSCH says:

    I have a version for letting them come in where they also have to wait, seated, and without barking before I’ll let them in. It took awhile but it works. They also have learned to sit and wait until I give the command for them to go eat.

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  60. Karen says:

    Chet!! I have so many ‘issues’ with Jet my dog!! I did try this but live in a row of terrace houses, not only does she bark continuously but jumps up and down too once the leash is on it’s a nightmare. Neighbours have complained about her barking and staying at the door until she looks at me is hard my friend! But thank you for sharing the video and I will keep trying to get her attention but sadly for me it’s not working kind regards Karen and Jet

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  61. Maureen Falkingham says:

    Hi Chet,
    Thanks for the e-mail, I am trying very hard to follow your video, but I have a VERY stubborn 9month Jackadoodle pup, she also is still going mental at the door and when anyone comes into the house and has started to jump, it is getting very tedious.

    Regards
    Maureen

    [Reply]

  62. Paula Juvinall says:

    My dog is fine at the door but horrible in the car when we stop somewhere. He wines so bad. He can’t make eye contact thru the sliding van door so this doesn’t work. I open the door and when he whines I close it sometimes taking 20 min for him to calm down. Suggestion?

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  63. Sandra McCord says:

    Hi Chet. My dog is a seven year old rescued Shar Pei. He has improved a lot with us but still a few problems. Certain people he will growl at and won’t go near, will sometimes squabble with our other Shar oei (both guilty of initiating fights) especially over food and separation anxiety when my husband leaves him. He has a few other issues you mention like barging up and down stairs, doors, pulling on lead and not listening. Looking at this list he appears to be a nightmare but he is a lovely dog when he is calm! Is it possible to train him out of these habits? He had a hard life until he came to us and I will admit, he is a bit spoiled. That bit I can fix 😄 thank you

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  64. Karen Schwartz says:

    I have not tried this method. My dogs obey the “wait” command when the door is open. I then step outside and give the release “OK” then they run out. This is more challenging if my male dog sees a cat, squirrel or rabbit out the window first. I need help desensitizing him the these critters.

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  65. Thanks Chet i do this training every time I go out of the door it takes a while but my 2 Jack Russell’s are starting to get the hang of it i also do it when going back in which is easier as they have had their walk and are not as excited

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  66. Chuck says:

    Hey guys !! Watched the video good start both the dogs& I need more reps.

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  67. Elia says:

    I will soon get my adopted beagle…. he’s coming Jun 17th. I understand he comes with separation anxiety. Any tips??

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  68. Sally says:

    I have a 15 mo. Standard Poodle who came with many fears and issues at 3 months. I also have 2 small dogs. The Poodle, Sophie, likes to plunge through all 3 of us to get out into the porch area. Now I have taught her to back up, then sit and wait. I let the 2 small dogs out, close the door for a few seconds, open the door and say “OK Sophie, you can go” and she walks through the door opening. I use the back up command when they go out in the morning and other times when all 3 want out. At this point I am really proud of Sophie because she knows the “drill” and it goes so smoothly.

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  69. Marcie Vedrani says:

    We have door and stair manners and most walking manners under great control. My two 2-1/2 year old labs understand that I go first when off leash walking anywhere in my home and outside without distractions. We have taking turns with fetching a ball or stick under control. BUT….Upon first site of another dog, bunny or person, I totally lose their attention and I cannot calm the pulling, jumping nor barking. We like to camp and my goal is to have them calm during these type of distractions. Any tips would be much appreciated.

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  70. Jolene Reith says:

    I did try this and believe it or not it worked pretty well the first time I tried it. It only took about 5 tries to get them ( I have 2 schnauzers) look at me and stay put until the door was all the way open before he went out. Usually they were jumping up on the door.

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  71. Missy says:

    Works

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  72. Gary Perkins says:

    I really cannot afford your courses but the few thing that I have learned from you certainly helped in a number of ways to train my dog, and I have to say he really enjoys it. It shows at the end of the day that us humans need the training to look after our best friends.
    Thanks

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  73. Terry says:

    Thanks I will take more time to watch your great videos. Thanks

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  74. Florence says:

    I tried it and it worked for my 9 months old puppy-Pomeranian mix. It took me 10 min to train him.

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  75. Gloria says:

    This is working for my 15 month old Boston terrier. I just need to continue w/this training. I do have problem w/her not coming when I call. Any suggestions?

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  76. Gigi Black says:

    Yes, this trick does work for going out a door. I can get my mini poodle to calm down until I open the door, then he he will run out. Coming into the house is another issue. He is jumping and bouncing all over. Once I open and shut the door a few times he will sit and wait for me to come in. Once I step one foot in, he starts bouncing and jumping all over me. Jumping and hitting me with his front paws is one of the biggest issues I have. The “off” command works only sometimes.

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  77. Martha Gordon says:

    Yes. The video was very helpful. I’ve only tried this twice so far but my 3 yr old female boxer/ pit mix is starting to watch me.

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  78. Meg DeSilva says:

    Our trainer just taught us this tonight in his training lesson. I will keep doing it until our dog gets it right the first time. It’s a great way to teach impulse control. Thank you for sending me the link!

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  79. Karen says:

    Wow…I tried this with our 5-month-old puppy, It works!!! Keep calm and quiet during the training session as Chet demonstrates. THEY GET IT! BRAVO, Chet!

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  80. Sandy says:

    I have a German shepherd who is 4 yrs old. My problem is he won’t stop Bitting and pulling to the point of jerking me plus winning and or barking. I so much want to take him for walks. Could you please give me soon Advice. I’ve looked for video’s and haven’t found any with my problem. I own a clicker but not sure how to use it for my situation. Please any suggestions. Thanks for taking the time to read and responding. Plankton (my dog) thanks you also.

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  81. Mike preciado says:

    Hi, i have 6 dogs, and they all need impulse control, so when i tried this i go 1 by 1, but its difficult because my other dogs get excited the one im trying to control, so what can i do in this case??

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    Minette Reply:

    Read this http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/train-dog-time-question-answered/

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  82. Cheryl Bryson says:

    5 month old puppy. When I’ve been out of the house, or husband out of the house, the jumping up as we are coming in the door is like she has springs on her feet. I totally ignore her and trying to continue walking through, but often I come close to tripping because of her antics. Husband uses a cane because of balance issues, so this is dangerous. She jumps up on us throughout the day, and I continuously tell her “down” and push her to a seated position, or tell her “no” and push her to a seated position or just tell her to sit. She remains seated for about one second, maybe two. This excited activity really needs correcting, and we work on it every day … but we’re getting nowhere. She knows what down means, she knows what off means, she knows sit, and I’ve tried the eye contact once she’s seated … Help!!!

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  83. Diana says:

    I have a 2 1/2 yr old shepherd/ridgeback mix who does really well at the door if we are going outside. It’s a totally different story if there is someone on the other side. She doesn’t bark but gets so excited that I can’t even get her attention. I don’t know how to use your technique without having a delivery person or salesperson stand there for 20 min as I open and shut the door. I also have trouble when we are on walks if she sees another person or dog. And if she reaches them she jumps and licks at the same time. I’m sure it can be intimating to have this 77lb beauty coming at you full force. She is such a good dog in every other way.

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  84. Sandra says:

    We have a two yr old Yorkiepoo that we got from a kennel in Feb. and have two major issues. 1. Can’t get her to like the car at all and 2. Separation anxiety is just terrible when we leave her to go do errands. What can we do. We need HELP BADLY !!!

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  85. Melanie says:

    I have been using this technique with the fur gang (3) for about 4 months now. Madi, my girl with the lowest impulse control, now sits at the door quickly. However I frequently need to back her up as our back entry is small. She will now keep eye contact until the door opens. Much bettet’. She is happier. She is 8 and has cancer. It could be the training that keeps her motivated to carry on…

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  86. Anne-Louise says:

    Eye contact is proving a good way for my dog to obey. I have a similar problem with my Labrador as Diana, in that he loves to greet visitors at the door. I think we are getting somewhere slowly. At least he does sit until the door is open, but then I have to break the eye contact.

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  87. denise wilson says:

    MY tiny timid Charlie is a rescue Jack Russell. I have had im for two months and even though i changed his name he comes when called ..even when barking at the next door neighbour. However her barks constantly if I leave him in my car or the house. How can i stop this behaviour when i am out of sight. By the way he does not like ANY type of treat.. and I mean ANY. his only obsession is his little ball.

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  88. Debra Lee says:

    Chet, I am adapting your techniques for use with my two black Lab mix 3-year-olds who have lived their entire lives outdoors. (Moving them indoors is not an option.) They already know “Sit” and I converted one dog’s impulse to jump on me into “do the Conga” for a treat (he jumps up and stands on his hind legs without contact with me — usually after Sit). Now when I go out to feed them, they have learned that they must go back “Inside” their dog run before I will approach the closed gate. Using your door impulse technique, I’m getting them to “Settle down” before I will open the gate and enter the run to put down their dishes while they Sit (now without any verbal command — trained before I learned of your courses).
    I definitely see improvement in their behavior, and things generally go well — but I am unsure how to handle the alpha dog when he decides to break training altogether. He will make a game of going back in under the gate (one of their dig-outs) then coming back outside after a couple seconds — or he won’t go inside at all. Meanwhile, my other dog has fully complied with the routine and is sitting quietly for his meal. If I walk past the one to feed the other, the first dog follows me into the run and sits. I end up feeding them both to prevent a food fight. How do I reinforce training for the noncompliant dog without “punishing” the compliant one by delaying his dinner? It seems to me that either action weakens the commands. Because of this occasional willfulness we’re still having challenges with Come when Called and any other extended-freedom training. Not able to separate the dogs, plus the unwanted behavior is unpredictable and only occasional.

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  89. Vivienne says:

    Thx so much that technique is good but it doesn’t work if people come to the door – he then goes out of control again! 🙂 I do have the impulse control program but can’t seem to get on top of him combusting with excitement anytime someone comes over!

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  90. Diane says:

    I have a 6 yr old female boxer. She grew up on a semi with my husband and I. For the past few years She stays at home with me now. I’m the only one without a fence. I’m surrounded by dogs who are fenced in. Lately she will see a cat, squirrel and bolt. I can’t keep her controlled bc she is a solid 85 lbs. She has always pulled on the leash, but leaving me and my yard are unacceptable. HELP!!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    I would recommend a gentle leader

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  91. Marie says:

    My dog has control and is obedient to myself and my children but not to my husband, so if he is with my husband he does as he pleases as my husband doesn’t expect him to listen or behave.
    With me there are rules which the dog respects automatically, with my husband the dog although still a good dog will not respect the commands.
    Any thoughts?
    Yes I tried explaining it to my husband…..

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  92. Audrey B says:

    Maybe if you crate one and work with one of them about an hour or so at a time it may help . I have five dogs all training . I can work two at a time but no more than that . Best of luck to you

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  93. Maja Jeremic says:

    I have just seen this video and tried it with my rescue dog who is bolting through the door into the garden to hunt – he has already escaped over the fence and wants to do it again, so he is always on the long lead.
    So I tried to get him to eye contact, but he often refuses it – he is quite bad at paying attention. However, after three attempts with some 5 minutes apart he was calmer even without eye contact and when I opened the door to reward him for being calmer he didn’t bolt straight through. So this was encouraging and I will keep repeating this. The only trouble is that I have another dog who has the poorest impulse control, so will have to work with both together. But so far, so good!

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  94. Maja Jeremic says:

    Hello, Chet!
    I am trying this exercise with my two dogs who have discovered that having a garden means foxes etc. come and visit and they charge and bark like crazy. So I think we have made a small progress. But… one of my dogs doesn’t do eye contact gladly (rescued street dog) and I wonder how that can be fixed. Otherwise, he has calmed a little waiting for the door to open – after two days. So we’ll continue. It seems like a really good exercise. Thanks!

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  95. Ellen says:

    I’ve watched video 3 times…i have 3 lap dogs.all rescues..my problem is the chihuaha is little to quick.. I’ve been teaching them “inside voice”..which has worked for the most part…

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  96. Patty Larson says:

    These videos can be played on DVD player? I really want these
    But will the play on DVD player

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    they can be downloaded to dvd

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  97. steve giroux says:

    Hi how do i stop my puppy from steady biting or nipping my old dog? I try talking calmly but no response she will send him to tge kennel i dont like that behaviour. What can i do Lucy puppy girl is about 12 weeks old.

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  98. Joyce Karim says:

    I cane across this my accident, and loved it. How can I get your d do and how much do they cost. I have a wonderful Jack Russel x Terrier who is my life and almost human, I call him my child as I am elderly and live alone, I know it’s my fault, but I have not discouraged him from sleeping in my bed. Trouble is, every tine I get up to go to the wash room, I seem to disturb him, that is to say every time I move out of bed, he puts his head up but goes back down as soon as I tell him to. He is very attached to me, and I have instinctively seem to have taught him to behave except for when the garbage men come to take the garbage, then all hell breaks
    loose, even if we are out, he chases the vans, and barks all the time naturally when he is not on the leash.!

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  99. Greg L. Massey says:

    love the control.

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  100. Jennifer says:

    Great video. We adopted a dog brought up from a pound in CA located in the LA area with the fires he if very anxious when left alone or restrained in any – I mean any – fashion. He has chewed through his harness, car seat belts, bent the door on his wire kennel, however, he is not afraid of lightning or firecrackers. How can we help him with his anxiety?

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  101. Georgia Caldwell says:

    Hi. I see that your message was posted in 2017, and there’s a good chance you no longer have your GS, but if you do, and he’s still not working well for you, I’ll take him. I may have to do some driving…I’m in the mountains of Western NC.

    Hope your knee and back are healing well,

    Georgia

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  102. Lynn says:

    I only need to know how to teach my 3 yr. old adopted MaltiPoo how to bark when I’ve let her out and she wants back in. I’ve had her a year now… so, Why? Because I’m 83, my mind isn’t as sharp as it used to be and twice, to my horror, I forgot & left her outside all night, once after a rainstorm during the night and when I found her she was at the back door hunkered down, cold, wet & shivering. I do NOT want that to happen again, especially with winter coming on. She never barks when she wants something, she just sits & waits.
    That’s the only thing I need to teach her.

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Use the search bar at the top of the page to search my articles for barking and teaching speak

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  103. SFenn says:

    Lynn,

    I’m a lot younger than you, but have also left our dog out for several hours in the heat. I started leaving the inside door open as a trigger. Perhaps you could think of some way to trigger you to remember to check. Also, I’ve watched a video of theirs about teaching to bark or not bark. I’ve started on it, but have so many other issues to deal with regarding our dogs.

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  104. SFenn says:

    Chet,

    We have 2 young dogs both adopted from strays late last year. One is basenji/beagle, the other is Silky Terrier mix (poodle?), both between 18-20 lbs. The basenji/beagle, Emmet, jumped a lot at the back door to go out. He’d jump so that his nails hit my hand when I tried to open the storm door. I started then, waiting for them to be calm before opening the door, by holding my hand below the handle horizontal to the floor. Didn’t take long at all for them to get the idea. After watching this video a few months ago, I started telling them to look at me and waiting until they did, although most of the time they were anyway.
    Now the Silky, Pepper, who is very hyper, will wait at the door EVEN WHEN THE DOOR IS OPEN (the latch doesn’t work well)!! They both do actually.
    One of Pepper’s problem is about walks. She jumps around so much I have to wait til she’s calm to put the leash on, then she wants to sprint. I finally started hooking the leash to the front of her harness. It helps a lot, so my arm/shoulder/neck don’t hurt every time. How do I get to calm down for a walk and WALK!
    Thanks!

    [Reply]

    Minette Reply:

    Leash them and let them drag their leashes for 20 minutes before you leave. YOu can also try playing some retrieve games with them first to let them burn off some steam

    [Reply]

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